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Discussion Starter #1
I had found a post for this formula on another page, But have seen others stating lower fps with more powder....   Any one Know for sure how close it really is....  and is this enough to actually shoot..   Thanks   for any info...  7.5 redhawk in 45 colt.

(Edited by Scout at 8:23 pm on Aug. 25, 2001)
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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It will probaby go bang.

It will NOT be very fast.

It will probably put out the biggest fireball you have ever seen.  Try one at night, if you get a chance.

20gr. of H110 and a 250 gr. bullet in the .45 colt does not sound like a very good combination to me.  I once loaded 26 grains w/255gr. SWC in a 7.5" Blackhawk and got the results above (but did not chrono).  Pressures/velocities will surely be very erratic.

For your reference...  I load more WW296 than that (just a little), with 335-340gr. bullets (Ruger only of course).  If you really have an urge for that bullet weight with that powder, I'd suggest starting at at least 25 grains, and go from there.
 

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Scout,

I'll certainly echo what Mike has posted here... excellent reply to your question.  That light a load of H110/W296 is bad medicine with a 250 grain bullet in your .45LC.

If seeking a light load for that bullet, try 10.0 grains of either Unique or Universal Clays.  These will give around 1050 fps and be very consistent loads.  Too, AA #5 would be an excellent choice as would IMR 800X powders.

The H110/W296 operates best, and most efficiently at the top 5% of the pressure envelope, and even the manuals from those powder companies don't recommend reducing their published loading data using these powders.

Bottom line, either increase the powder charges of H110/W296 to the 25.0-26.0 grain range, or change powders as suggested above!  You'll be much happier. (safer too!)

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info; I just get confused with powder listings showing low charges like these...   In my readings, I was led to believe this to be a starting load.     I even found a post on http://www.loadyourown.com/loaddata/
If memory serves me, I found the same load in one of my load manuals.... or Magazine...     If, and when my Ruger comes home... from the ...well lack of words to call them at this time.         Thanks for the info again, not looking forward on pulling them got in a loading frenzy that night...      You know, unloaded brass tends to cry to you in the middle of the night from lack of company...       Hahaha....    Again thanks,  

    I really enjoy reading everyone’s posts, and seeing the answer mans reply...........    You do well....   thanks...
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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That load is definitely a typo.  Either the powder type was wrong, or the powder charge was wrong (or both).  No way will you get 1350fps or whatever was listed.

There are a number of inconsistencies on that page.  I'd not use any more load data from that source.  There is plenty of .45 Colt data for Blackhawks in the manuals from Hornady, Speer, Sierra, Nosler, Lyman, Hodgdon, Accurate, etc., etc.

Just goes to prove the old adage of checking any load that you find against other sources.

If you did load 20.0 grains with that bullet, I'd pull them.  They won't perform worth sour apples and might be dangerous to boot.  Sorry...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok, Ill pull them,  
   That is going to be a lot of work....  
Any way to save my cast bullets...   Or am I just out?   I am open for any pulling tricks...   Hope to save them if possible...          

  Started thinking about cross-reference material you subjected earlier....  

According to Sierra a 240-grain bullet behind, 20.7 grains of 110 will produce 1400fps.   Now I know Sierra makes their bullet a touch small, .4515 is that why?    Speer makes note a charge of 296 at 20.5 will push 1183fps.  Bullet dia. .451          These are all jacketed bullets.      
  Please understand, I am not questioning or even trying to argue,
                <<< HELP>>>
   I loaded about 200 rounds at this charge....  
100 of 255 swc  100 of 250 rnfp    
           
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Well..... now I don't know what to think.  I checked my loading manuals and found some of the same data.

But, like you said, it's all for jacketed bullets, which may provide more resistance to the bullet starting in the bore, and more resistance overcoming the crimp, things which could help the powder burn more uniformly.

What primer did you use (curiousity, don't think that it affects the final outcome)?

I honestly don't know at this point.  It's definitely boderline.... guess you are going to have to make the decision.

Were I to pull the bullets, I'd use an inertial puller (the kind that looks like a hammer), and smack it against the hardest surface I could find (such as an anvil or concrete floor).

If the bullets aren't squished undersized by this, then they could be reused.

The bullet pulling will go a little faster, if you throw away the collet supplied with the tool and just use an ordinary shellholder instead, by the way.

Good luck.
 

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Scout,

Indeed this reloading realm can be confusing.

Just for a little clarification, jacketed bullets have a higher friction coefficient in the barrel than do lead alloy bullets (at least at handgun velocities), consequently, the pressures and velocities generated by a load of powder behind a jacketed bullet will be higher than an equal powder charge with comparable weight alloy bullet due to this phenomenon.  What would be a good working load with many lead bullet handgun cartridges would be primer popping dangerous rounds if loaded with equal weight jacketed pills.

By all means, pull those 200 rounds of loaded ammo!

Now, if you want to salvage your powder and bullets, use an inertia type bullet puller, and put a piece of common kitchen sponge in the bottom of the puller's container.  This way the bullet won't be damaged when it comes out of the case, and not only can you reuse the bullets, but the powder too can be poured into a container and then returned to the proper powder canister for use at a later date.

Speaking of dates, just consider that the lonely brass you described is getting to know you on a first name basis! You get to spend another lovely evening together!

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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Discussion Starter #9
OK, another attempt.

           How about I use them in my 16.5 in Winchester Ranger instead?     Will this be a safe load?

 I have convinced myself of pulling these....  
If you still recommend....    Thanks for the SAFE advice...      I am warming up the old elbow now...      Oh, thanks for the advice on the shell holder, I hate that collet I got....
 
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