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We've all seen used guns for sale. Many I've been interested in buying. But, I must admit I'm hesitate. I have this idea the guy dropped it on the range or it has unseen mechanical problems, etc. All my guns have been NIB. Anybody have any thoughts on the subject? Good, bad, whatever.
 

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Most of what I have puchased have been used. I have yet to find a problem gun (out of about a dozen purchased). Just check it out well.
 

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I think it's more of a risk buying used guns online where you can't examine them than when buying a used gun in person. Even so I've bought 1 used gun online and 1 NIB online, and several used "over the counter" and haven't had a problem yet.

I had more trouble with a brand new Colt Officers Model 1911 than I've had with any of the used guns I've bought.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Of the many firearms I've purchased, less than 10% were new. Never had a problem with used ones, as I usually pretty well knew what to expect due to condition or style. Many were modified from original purchase condition or configuration, but that was normally due to personal desire to do such - not out of necessity.
 

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All of the rifles I have now have been bought used. The most trouble I have had was with a new rifle, and I was eventualy refunded my money for that one. I have a Winchester model 70 in .22-250 that shoots 3/8" groups and a 8x57 Mauser that puts them all into 1" at 100 yards. I have the 2 rifles for the cost of 1 new Winchester. We do what we have to, when we are on a budget.
 

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Buying guns is a crapshoot.

Most of my guns have been bought new. Most of them have been good. But there are some that have had to be worked over just to function.
The used guns I have bought, have worked as is, but again some of them have needed to be worked on to be "right".

When I go to purchase a gun, rifle or handgun, new or used, I check it out as good as I can. Most of the time I am successful in weeding out the lemons. Sometimes not.

My last purchase was a NIB Rossi Puma in .45 Colt. It was nice. No wear, no dings or scrapes. In the original box with all the factory papers. It was an early one without the safety thing, the price was right, and it was a private party sale.
I looked it over in the dim light of the gun show as good as I could. But short of loading it and attempting to shoot it, the defects could not be seen.
It had to go back to M&M for work just to feed factory ammo.

When buying a gun, study up on the design and function of the brand and model you are looking for. Learn what idiosyncrasies it has. Were the critical wear points are. Then take a little time and check it out.
If the seller wont let you check it out -- pass on it.
 

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I agree with the others. Give the gun a good inspection, hold the seller to his word on the condition of it, too. One thing I would add is, the thing I like about used rifles, at least the older ones is the history they have been a part of. If I can trace the history of the rifle, so much the better, but just running your hand along a scratch in the stock evokes a scene deep in dark swamps of South Carolina, the desert plains of West Texas, or the snow capped mountains and alder jungles of Alaska. Granted the rifle needs to be checked over for excessive wear and proper functioning, but at least the pre 64 Winchesters, the Super 30 Remingtons, the Weatherby's made on Mauser actions, the FN Mauser Brownings, Mauser 98's, Brno's, etc.. are really well made firearms, as good or better than anything made today in my opinion. If you find one that has been treated well, even if hunted hard, they are a real treasure. Buying a new rifle these days allows you write your own history with it, but a rifle from the past is special also.

You can't find a Winchester M21 or a Parker Bros, new these days either. Sometimes, if you are looking for a particular model, you have to go with a used firearm. I've been really pleased with all the used guns I've bought.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for repling. Sound advice from all. I've been burned too many times with lemon cars (all new) that I'm a little shell-shocked with anything that is 'used'.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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The majority of my guns were used before I purchased. So far, no lemons - probably one of the worst was in fact one that I bought brand new.

I figure you can just about always get your money back out of a used gun.
 

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The main thing you need to do concerning buying a used gun is #1 make sure it is LEGAL! The next thing is to have it inspected buy someone who is very knowledgeable about guns, making sure it is in good working condition. I buy very few used guns, but those I do buy, I check them out well and fire several live rounds through them before cash leaves my hands.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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It's true that would be the ultimate way to buy a firearm, 2 bits.

Little hard to accomplish at a gun show, though!
 

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:cool: What is a used gun? As soon as you fire a new gun it is used. I have only bought two over- the-counter-in-the-box guns in the last 25 or so yrs. Since my preference is older firearms, there are many considerations, not the least of which is financial. So far, no problems have been encountered. Just get your gun checked by a competent smith.
 

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Just get your gun checked by a competent smith.
That is the hard part. Finding a competent gunsmith. A lot of them push their knowlege of the guns your wanting checked out into a dark corner and run on prejudices, and arrogence.
Just like the two major gunsmiths in Springfield, IL. Mouthy pompus jerks.

One place told me you absolutly could not fit a New Model Ruger Blackhawk cylinder to an Old Moder Revolver. Thats crap, what does he think Ruger does? That lie cost them some work. And I fitted a NM cylinder to my OM BH myself.

The other one botched up a barrel reset job in my 9422. Both sights leaned to the right exactly the same ammount. I asked them to remove the barrel and reset it so the sights were at top dead center. Nope, they pulled the barrel, ground off the front sight base, put on a screw type base, reblued the barrel, and put it back. Now the front sight is sorta at TDC and the rear sight is still crooked. That was almost a year ago and I'm still P.O.ed.


I apologize for getting off topic and in a rant. But good qualified gunsmiths are hard to find. Especially locally. I need one to redo my 9422 so it's right. But who to send it, or take it to?


Back to topic:
I said earlier that to check out a gun you need to study up on its mechanical designs, and then research it's idiosyncracies. This way you can catch most of the potential problems youself.
It's nice if you have the availability of a good gunsmith too. But don't hold your breath.
 
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