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Why do you reload?

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I have been interested in handloading for some time but I wonder if it is worth it, for me.

I shoot about 200-300 rounds of 9mm Luger per month at paper targets and plinking for pleasure only. I also carry concealed but use commercial personal defense ammo for that.

I have a good friend who has been handloading for decades and has accumulated enough extra equipment over the years to set me up with everything necessary so equipment cost is not an issue.

However, from the prices for bullets, powder and primers I can find online, even if I save all my brass never had to buy any new. it will probably cost me more to reload than Wilson white box costs at Wally World.

I am a very detail oriented person and the idea of the precision and control offered by loading my own ammo is very attractive.

Any comments will be appreciated.
 

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I only read the part were you said 300 rds a month . If you dnt want to reloaded sell the brass . Go to midwayusa see what they want per 100 cases
 

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You're comparing apples n' oranges, when talking about Wilson "white box" ammo and what you can create yourself. I didn't vote in the poll because there was not "all of the above" option. :)

If I only owned one gun or guns chambered for one cartridge, I would not bother to reload, unless I was shooting many more rounds than you are.
 

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You sound like an ideal candidate. "I am a very detail oriented person and the idea of the precision and control offered by loading my own ammo is very attractive" You can save $$$ especially if you value your time at zero. But most enjoy reloading - the process and the ability to create the exact ammunition they want. Also, you can reverse engineer ammunition that is "perfect" for your particular firearm. I like hard cast bullets with the largest meplat possible especially the LBT design as sold on this site. I don't like max loads but prefer big slow bullets which I cannot buy over the counter. Something above "Cowboy" levels or SAAMI spec but below insane. I do self-defense and for those that hunt you can save a bundle of $$$. But if you just shoot paper then you may be right but I still think you can save some $$$.
 

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To reload or not to reload, whereas the poll in the beginning of the thread indicates most reload to save so they can shoot more, I'd be willing to bet real money that the majority of these "savers" really enjoy reloading as a stand alone hobby unto itself. Shooting what you produce is just a big bonus. If one didn't enjoy reloading for itself and only shot a couple hundred rounds a month he probably wouldn't stay with it for long. Only out of necessity for a shooting discipline that required a couple thou a month, then it would be a chore not a hobby. YMMV..I enjoy all aspects of it. Well, maybe not trimming brass....
 

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I picked control, because I really like the ability to size and fit my rounds to my guns. Improved accuracy and good consistency are pluses and side effects also. However, I've paid for my equipment and then some if I were shooting factory ammo. Even using premium bullets, like FTX or Partitions, I still save money. So both are contributions to why I reload. ;)
 

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First response for me would be the control of firearm specific ammo tailored for accuracy. After that, it saves me a little money depending on caliber I reload. I save about 55% reloading for my .375 H&H, .300 H&H and .416 Rigby not to mention hunting and bear loads for my .45 Colt and .357 magnum.
 

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Reloading 9mm and generic .223 is probably pretty pointless if you factor in your time at minimum wage.

I do it anyway. I LIKE reloading. I don't do a lot of experimenting, other than some time spent finding a combination my .308 likes. 99% of my reloading is common-as-dirt, standard recipe target shooting stuff. I probably save a few bucks in the .45ACP and .45Colt and maybe even .357.

.38spl and 9mm I can buy nearly as cheaply as I can reload, but with a pile of brass and a couple of thousand bullets on hand, I KNOW it will be available.

I just started loading .380 so I can shoot my Walther more and not be held hostage to price and availability swings. .380 seems to be the "flavor of the week" right now, and it flies off the shelves.

So for me, it's a couple of factors, but basically I just enjoy the process and it's a good way to while away a winter evening.
 

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I voted just because. Just because you reload, that doesn't mean you're going to save money (quite the contrary) And reloaded isn't necessarily more accurate than factory stuff. Accuracy has more to do with practice than anything else. And once you start, it's a very hard habit to kick.
 

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I started back around 1971. I probably haven't saved any money over the long haul but I am sure that I did more shooting. More than that, it's fun.
 

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I have been interested in handloading for some time but I wonder if it is worth it, for me.

I shoot about 200-300 rounds of 9mm Luger per month at paper targets and plinking for pleasure only. I also carry concealed but use commercial personal defense ammo for that.
My thought, probably not. If you get a progressive, and purchase everything in bulk quantities, you'll hit break even in a "a while". These days, I can't compete with case quantities for clay birds. If I shot a 9mm, and purchased larger quantities, it would be quite a while until I was ahead, and of the rounds that require attention to detail, the 9mm is near the top of the list.

Reloading is a real need if you live in the "outback".
It's handy if you have a single rifle or handgun, "for everything".
If you have a real interest in ballistics, reduced loads, precision shooting, hi performence hunting ammo, and getting your own cast bullets to shoot, reloading/handloading is a great way to learn more about your gun and ammo. If you like to go "bang", with no interest beyond that, there's no point.

Since the "Obama Effect", I've watched all sorts of people run out and get a gun, then stand in line, literally, when the ammo trickled in. I had my reserves, and kept on shooting and fiddling away. Somewhere in between those two, you transition to making your own, but it isn't for everybody.
 

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Thanks Cheezywan. I now know how someone from La. feels when they vote in an election.

I,m not understanding Chief?

I voted for Txpharm to reload his/her own. I believe is worth the effort.
Probably just a misunderstanding in the way we read/respond to posts.

To be more clear, reloading for yourself is very much worth the effort in my view.

Cheezywan
 

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I edited my post, CM. I was being sarcastic about being able to vote in creative ways in political elections in the south. I forgot to add the attitude face. This post has helped me with poles on forum, though. I did not know you could pick more than one answer until now.
 

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I started back reloading a couple of years ago after laying off for quite a long time. When I started back it was a matter of money, with all the stuff I had it was far cheaper to reload than to buy and then the ammo crunch came. But I discovered something I don't recall before, that reloading is relaxing. The rytheme I get into with pistol and shotshell loading kinda takes the stress of the day away.

Some of my reloading is for specific stuff I can't buy, at least not readily. Most is for cost savings but you have to understand, I'm still using stuff from 20+ yrs ago!
 

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Better do it. You will learn a lot, and shoot a lot more, and become a better shot, and a guy who can teach others.
 

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A lot of what I re-load is for obsolete cartridges that cannot be purchased over the counter, such as 38/55 and 32/40 Black powder loads, .300 Rook, 8mm Siamese, .35 French and .255 Jefferies to name a few. Many older cartridges are at extreme price ranges when they are found, thus making reloading very actractive. Many of my re-loads also contain cast bullets that I cast myself. Casting the bullets is just as adictive as re-loading, and quite relaxing as well. As was said in a previous post, there hould have been another catagory, "All of the Above."
 
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