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Discussion Starter #1
I just bought a Winchester 70 30-06, and my sisters boyfriend keeps telling me I need to reload. Is reloading the 30-06 really worth it? I have a line in on an older lee press with 30-06 dies to come with it (rcbs dies) and a shell holder for the 30-06 (whatever size that is) for $50 ish. It also comes with a really low end powder measure device. I have 60 rounds of unfired ammo that I am gonna use with the gun so I can keep the brass.

Also, how hard is reloading? It seems to me like it is somewhat challenging. But I want to load some super accurate ammo for long range coyote hunting, but I don't want to ruin the pelt. And is reloading something like where if it works well in one gun it works well in the next? Or do you have to reload ammo for only one gun?

Last note, how much cheaper/more expensive is reloading? I know there is tons of forums about people getting into reloading like I may be, but not many are current, and not many are current AND for the 30-06. Hoping for some answers from experienced reloaded, as well as newbies (so I can be warned of if it is challenging)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Also, I always kept the used 30-06 shells from the 21 gun salute at funerals and Memorial Day services, just in case I ever needed it. I found a bucket of them, so I actually have well over a hundred brass casings. How many times can I re use a case?
 

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Buy The ABC's of Reloading, read it and see if it's something you'd be interested in.
 
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Reloading can be very simple or it can get very complicated as you chase the last 1/10 of an inch on your group sizes. Even though your cost per round will go down the savings don't usually amount to much money since most handloaders do a bunch more shooting.

There are members on this forum who get outstanding life out of their cases. That is another instance where more you learn the longer those components last. When i started reloading my cases were doing good to last 5 cycles.
 

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Howdy Rifleman
Reloading is deff. worth it if you plan on doing a lot of shooting or even if u just want to get the most out of your rifle but you can't expect to save a lot of money. Shooting will be cheaper but reloading becomes an an addiction in which you'll find your self heplessly involved to the point saving money is no longer part of why u reload. You asked if you can reload one load for any gun of the same calibe. The answer is yes but every gun is diff. So if u want the most out of it, u need to Taylor for each. But to get the basics of reloading down is the first step. Get lots of reloading manuales and don't stray from their data. BTW congrats on the m70, I had one years ago and I'm still kicking myself for trading it for something shiny that wasn't worth it.
 

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How much shooting are you planning on doing?

You could due a cost analysis and figure out how many rounds of factory loads it would take to justify the cost of the reloading equipment and producing reloaded ammo. In your case with low cost reloading equipment available you might want to just jump in. As time goes on you could upgrade the equipment to meet your developing needs.

When you reload you can produce loads that are difficult or impossible to purchase. You might be looking into a high velocity bullet that does not expand which would be easy to produce reloading full jacketed bullets. This type of load might do less damage to pelts. Reloading offers many alternatives for ammo that factory ammo just does not offer. Many reloaders use lead bullets in all types of firearms and they can be very accurate and low cost compared to jacketed bullets.

Accuracy, many firearms have preferences for ammo that they will shoot accurately. Several times I have had firearms that seemed like poor performers but experimenting with a variety of loads I have found loads that work well for that particular gun. A lot of times an old fashion load even from and earlier firearm will work out excellent. I have a N frame S & W 357 which never shot worth a darn with 357 magnum ammo but 38 special 200 grain super police loads make this revolver shoot like a target revolver. This load is out of date and or out of fashion but easy to produce when reloading.

Best wishes on your choose to become a reloader or not.
 

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Just a reminder, you shouldn't reload blank cartridge brass.
Buy the book ABCs of Reloading....I think somebody already suggested that!
 

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If you are planning on shooting a lot then reloading makes sense,but if you go to the range once in a while
to check your rifle then I would say no.I would buy premium loaded ammo for the game you hunt.
 

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Just a reminder, you shouldn't reload blank cartridge brass.
Buy the book ABCs of Reloading....I think somebody already suggested that!
Just finished the ABC's of Reloading. Got it from the library. Great overview of the whole process, great info on powders, well worth reading.
Good luck, I'm at about the same stage as you are in regards to reloading,
Cory
 

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I find reloading to be most rewarding on many levels. I enjoy the entire process. There are a whole lot of ways to spend your time. That you can save some $$$ is a bonus. If you want to get a couple of decent manuals get Lyman's 49th and Modern Reloading by Richard Lee.
 
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You are going to have $150 bucks in a couple of different powders, couple batches different bullets,primers, and a few tools extra you'll need. However you'll shoot 5 to 10 boxes of shells getting it down. compare that to the 5 boxes of shells you'll shoot hunting and sighting in over the next five years and you will find this will help in the "long range coyote hunting" you want to get into. Be forewarned that my wife made me put a clock in my reloading room. Jump in there!!
 

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Not wanting to pee on your parade, but what JBelk said about reloading blank brass is absolutely true. You see, they are rejects to begin with, and then the flash holes are enlarged to provide more flame for ignition. Other than that, I think you will find reloading a rewarding new hobby! The deal offered you is pretty good, actually, I have a Lee "O" type press, and darned if I don't like it more than my Hornady! The next two things you need are a good manual and a scale. With a set of dies and components you will be ready to start! Sure, there are lots of goodies and you will eventually want to add to your equipment, but all you need to get started is correct data, a thorough understanding of what you are about to do, some components, a scale and what you will already get in your deal. Don't forget to buy some case lube though, or you'll be cussing all of us who encouraged you to get started!
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
I am a competition shotgun shooter at Iowa State, and I have reloaded some shotgun shells before. Is rifle shells terribly more complicated? (Reloaded out of necessity. Illegal to hunt birds with lead ammo, and there was a shortage of steel 4 shot for a while. Used one of the opd lee handy loaders (those hammer looking things) I found in a toolbox of my dads. Pretty fun!)
This fun will just be a fun, accurate hunting gun. My goal is to get a .5 MOA group at 100 yards. I know that's nothing special but I'm gonna go for it with q stock gun, but I've never made hand loads before, so I don't know how accurate I will be able to make it. This gun will be the go to deer rifle, (much closer range for the most part. But an occasional long shot) but mostly it will be my beanfield rifle.

To give you a picture of what I do coyote hunting, I usually sit on a terrace of a field, overlooking 4-600 yards slightly downhill to a river on the front, and woods on my left and right sides. It's in the shape of a U that I'm hunting in. I call the coyotes the best I can, and they're getting really smart, so at best I can get them to peak out of the woods, and if I see them in time, I may have a shot. The closest I've ever gotten a coyote (when I'm hunting specifically for them) is 150-200 yards ish.
 

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Hello.For that price you could chuck it away if you dont like !
Reloading is daunting to start .
I started last year , took me years to take the first step, the good people on this forum got me going.
Now i am very disapointed i did not start years ago.
Follow the instructions in a manual , start half way between min and max go slow and i think you will be surprised.
You might find your gun likes your first loads and shoots great.
If not it is not a big deal to change loads.

Press .
Dies .
Shell holder.i
Powder weigher.
Priming tool if the press doesn't.
Bullet puller . (Optional but handy)
Cases.
Powder.
Bullets.
Manual.
If you are going to load for one caliber only then reloading can be very cheep compared to factory amo and better.
But ...... :)

Just out of curiosity isn't a 30-06 pretty big for pelt keeping.

What sort of bullets do you think you will use.

One of the things i love about loading is in Australia , don't no about there , wildcats are cheap rifles , i can get beautiful rifles fore 1/4 of the price of new of the shelf gear.
Love it!
Had 5 when i started , now i'm over 20 .
Just keep finding nice guns cheap cause they are oddball calibers.
With no intensions of stoping , because i am ADICTED:)
 

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I think reloading is worth it, you can gain alot of accuracy from it if you tailor the rounds to the rifle. I would, like others suggested, getting as many manuals as you can, you can also visit hodgden website for some free load data. I started reloading a few years back and enjoy doing it. It can get very tedious if you make it that way, but it depends on how picky you want to be. I know a few people that call me crazy for loading 9mm as well as weighing every charge of powder before I load it, but that's just me. Good luck and have fun.
 

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Depends on what you mean by worth it. I really can't tell you if I save money. I hear that factory ammo is pretty good nowadays. To me though it is more than worth it because I enjoy doing it so much, it's actually a good stress buster for me. When I go to my reloading bench I am by myself no phone, no distractions, loading bench is in the attic which is quietest least distractive place in my house. I usually turn the radio on some classic rock or country music and just enjoy the downtime that it actually is to me. My wife doesn't even bug me when I retreat to the loading bench. Just kidding about my wife been married for 32 years and we actually get along and like each others company. The only thing I enjoy more is my grandkids. I guess I've become a little addicted to reloading.
 

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For a guy who wants his dedicated 30-'06 deer rig to also shoot coyotes at ~400 yards without destroying the pelt, reloading is almost mandatory. You might not save money by reloading, but you'll be able to put together ammunition specifically tailored to your rifle and your needs, for the same cost as buying ho-hum ammo off the shelf.

By the way, getting .5 MOA from many rifles IS a big deal! Don't let all the stuff you read on the Internet make you think you haven't accomplished something when YOU and your rifle shoot a 1/2" group at 100 yards, or a 1" group at 200 yards. Even with today's rifles, that's darn good shootin'! ;)

Reloading is really just three steps:

1) Prep the case for reloading
2) Charge with powder
3) Seat a new bullet

The catch is that the first step can be quite a few steps in itself. Personally, I look at case prep as the real meat of reloading, because of how much it can impact your accuracy. Once your case prep is done, dropping a suitable charge of powder into the case and then seating a quality bullet is something anyone can do.

If you like the relaxation of fishing, you'll probably enjoy reloading.
 

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By the way, getting .5 MOA from many rifles IS a big deal! Don't let all the stuff you read on the Internet make you think you haven't accomplished something when YOU and your rifle shoot a 1/2" group at 100 yards, or a 1" group at 200 yards. Even with today's rifles, that's darn good shootin'!

Quite so. In fact that puts you in the top 20% of hunting rifle shooters.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Shreck
You're right. The '06 IS a big rifle for pelt keeping. But only if you use expanding ammo. I either try to find varmint grenade type ammo, or full metal jackets. With the full metal jacket, it only leaves a .3" hole in both sides, and as long as you hit in the right area, it still kills the coyote.

MusgraveMan
Winchester says they garuantee 1 MOA accuracy out of the gun with at least ONE factory ammo, and I've been reading up and many hand loaders are capable of .4-.5 MOA with it. Accuracy like that makes it so a slight wobble at 400 yards is only a little bit off, instead of a LOT off. So if you wobble 3", with a 1 MOA gun, you can be off as much as 7", vs if you wobble the same with a .5 MOA gun, you're only off 5". Which is a bigger deal than you think with coyotes. Getting a gut shot instead of a torso shot is a matter of an inch off of the torso, and can lead to a lot of tracking and possibly losing the coyote to die later and get eaten by other coyotes and turkey vultures. It's a nice little advantage to have.
 

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Up front costs make it seem more expensive, but the more you reload, the less it costs. Bonus- when the "panic of the moment" empties all the shelves, you can still shoot & hunt.
 
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