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Dad (who has passed on) had a GEW 98 action tagged onto a Douglas premium barrel (1 in 10 twist) in 7X57. I have a couple boxes of his handloads using 175 gr Hornady roundnose bullets with 49.4 grs of H4831.

My fourth edition Hornady Handbook doesn't show any H4831 with its 175 gr bullets. And the Hodgdon web site only goes up to about 44 grains using a 175 gr Nosler.

So does that load look too hot to you guys? Thanks, Roger in Texas
 

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The Shadow
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I think you already answered your own question, If Hodgdon shows less, and it is their powder....

Lee shows H4831 @40.0 grains making 50,667 PSI.
Now longer COL will lower pressure and speed, BUT 9 grains is a Big jump. I would pull them, and start again.
 

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175 GR. NOS PART Hodgdon H4831 .284" 3.025" 37.0 2098 41,300 CUP 40.0 2201 45,700 CUP

This is the data I took off the Hodgdon site. It shows the max as 40, not 44. So with that information I personally would pull those bullets and err on the side of caution.

BTW the 7x57 is a great round.
 

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Dad (who has passed on) had a GEW 98 action tagged onto a Douglas premium barrel (1 in 10 twist) in 7X57. I have a couple boxes of his handloads using 175 gr Hornady roundnose bullets with 49.4 grs of H4831.

My fourth edition Hornady Handbook doesn't show any H4831 with its 175 gr bullets. And the Hodgdon web site only goes up to about 44 grains using a 175 gr Nosler.

So does that load look too hot to you guys? Thanks, Roger in Texas

I think that it depends on the chamber and the rifle

The following data is from the Hogdon web loading data and is for the 7-08 which I believe has slightly less case capcity than the 7-57


<TABLE border=0 cellSpacing=2 cellPadding=2 width="100%"><TBODY><TR><TD class=mini align=middle>175 GR. NOS PART </TD><TD class=mini align=middle>Hodgdon </TD><TD class=mini align=middle>H4831 </TD><TD class=mini align=middle>.284" </TD><TD class=mini align=middle>2.800" </TD><TD class=mini align=middle>47.0 </TD><TD class=mini align=middle>2443 </TD><TD class=mini align=middle>46,600 CUP </TD><TD class=mini align=middle>49.0C </TD><TD class=mini align=middle>2516 </TD><TD class=mini align=middle>49,400 CUP </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

Your father was shooting that load, do you not think that he knew what he was doing? The 98 Mauser is a strong action
 

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BTW the 7x57 is a great round.
I agree. Even though it's over 100 years old, it is a great round. I have a Ruger 77, and a 98 Mauser re-barrelled in this caliber. Both of them are great rifles.

Most load data for this caliber errs on the side of caution, because the Gewehr 93 was a black powder receiver, while the Gewehr 98 was rated for smokeless powder....and because of that, they keep the loading light enough that it would be safe in a G93.

I honestly think that in modern firearms, the max loads could probably be increased another 10%....but this is just my opinion, and only an opinion.

I follow the load data, and don't experiment.
 

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PSG-1, FYI: All of the Mauser actions from 91 thru 98 were chambered in smokeless powder cartridges. Those prior to the 98 are considered as less strong due to the absence of the third or safety lug on the bolt and allowances must be made for older metallurgy and heat treatment procedures. Goatwhiskers the Elder
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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The turks were ambitious and rechambered lots of 93s to 8x57. If you haven't shot surplus Turk ball ammo, you don't know what "hot" is :eek: Maybe not a great idea in a 93 action, but they do survive such treatment.....

Anyway by chance did your father use surplus 4831? Hodgdon resold that stuff into the 1970s, at least, and you still find it around. I have a little bit loaded up in some fire-forming loads for my .257 Weatherby.
 

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Good point by Mike. Surplus is non-canister grade and could have a double digit percent burning rate difference from what is normally sold now, depending on the lot it came from? So there may be no easy way to tell by the charge weight and powder number alone. You'll have to pull enough of them to work them back up again starting with the standard data for starting load, watching for pressure signs.
 

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My Sierra manual, copyright 1989, shows a maximum charge of 49.6gr of H4831 for their 175gr round-nose bullet, in the 7x57 cartridge. If you ask me, your dad's loads are almost certainly safe and this is just another example of an attorney defining what is "safe" from liability, not what is safe in a Mauser 98 action. Was your dad a reasonably cautious and attentive person? If he were alive today, would you trust his reloads?

All this talk of pulling the bullets is certainly the safest thing to do, but maybe you should just hang onto those old loads, for sentimental reasons. Get some new brass and whatever else you need and work up your own loads, even though you could probably shoot what your dad put together and be just fine.
 

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Hornady's Handloading Manual copyrighted and published in 1973 shows even higher charges than what you've posted. There manual previous to this edition was published in 1967 and took five years to develop the data used in there '73 edition. Depending on time frame in which your father reloaded the shells its possible there perfectly safe to use. Only you know what temperment you father had with his firearms and reloading. If he was cautious with safety always formost in his mind then there probably okay. On the other hand if he was always pushing for something bigger, better and with more horsepower then you better pull the bullets and start over.
 

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I guess I am not sure why it is worth the risk for a couple of boxes. I mean, if you had a dozen boxes, then I could see where it would be economically important to find out. But for 2 boxes? Heck there are much better bullets available now anyway. If I were you, I would go with 160 gr Trophy Bonded Bear Claws, Nosler 160 Accu-bonds or Partitions, or Hornady 154 gr Innebonds. Develop loads using these bullets and forget about maxing out some 175 gr RN SPs. These bonded bullets (as well as the Partition) with a MV in the 2600 to 2700 range will do anything that 175 round nose will do (at any safe charge level) and you'll shoot flatter to boot.
 

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Thanks for correcting me on that, goatwhiskers. I knew there was a difference in the strength of the receivers....I thought it was BP vs. smokeless, so, thanks for clarifying that.


The Hornady Light Magnum is a good performer in this caliber, BTW.
 

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Good evening,

"Hornady Handbook of Cartridge Reloading", 1967.

175gn round nose, max load listed, 4831, 50.2gns, 2600fps.

They would have been using surplus powder. As far as I know there was no "canister" 4831 in those days. Great stuff, especially at $3 a pound.

Cheers Mark
 

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I had a good shooting 7X57 when I was younger. I did the dumbest thing
ever and got rid of it. Hope to have another one some day. It is the nicest
shooting cartridge around.

Zeke
 

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Discussion Starter #15
"I guess I am not sure why it is worth the risk for a couple of boxes. I mean, if you had a dozen boxes, then I could see where it would be economically important to find out. But for 2 boxes? Heck there are much better bullets available now anyway. If I were you, I would go with 160 gr Trophy Bonded Bear Claws, Nosler 160 Accu-bonds or Partitions, or Hornady 154 gr Innebonds. Develop loads using these bullets and forget about maxing out some 175 gr RN SPs. These bonded bullets (as well as the Partition) with a MV in the 2600 to 2700 range will do anything that 175 round nose will do (at any safe charge level) and you'll shoot flatter to boot."
Bird Dog II makes the best arguement for me -- I'll pull them and reload with fresh stuff. Thanks a lot guys -- always helps to have several intelligent opinions. Roger in Texas
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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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I'd use them for pigs, myself. Just my opinion!
 

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When my Brazilian Model 1908 was still in 7x57 military action/bbl configuration and was Ackley Improved, it shot 175 gr Remington spitzers very accurately with 52.0 gr of RL-22. Usually, AI'ing this cartridge results in ability to cram 4 extra grains of powder into the case. This would roughly figure to be 48.0 gr for the standard case.

RL-22 is in the burn rate as 4831, maybe just a tad slower. I don't think you'd get into much over pressure with the 49.0 gr loading, but the old addage - "When in doubt, throw it out". It's up to you, but personally, I'd try one of two to check for obvious visual pressure signs before pulling down the loads., But that's just me.
 

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Dad (who has passed on) had a GEW 98 action tagged onto a Douglas premium barrel (1 in 10 twist) in 7X57. I have a couple boxes of his handloads using 175 gr Hornady roundnose bullets with 49.4 grs of H4831.
As bad as my memory is anymore, I'm often surprised what is still laying around in there.

I have many of Jack O'Connor's books, published from the late 40's to 70's, and I'll bet that might have been a Jack recipe. He lists one load for his 7 x 57 that uses that same bullet, and nearly the same weight of 4350, pre-Hodgdon. And looking at some of my favorite chapters, it's not a wimp load by any means, but at that time would have been pretty normal.

On the other hand, they will never sue Jack, or even old Alfred, the publisher.

To shoot 'em, or not to shoot 'em, that is the question :D
 

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i'd shoot 'em! the 7x57 has always been held to a lower sammi pressure spec due to the 93 mausers not the 98's... personally i think this is much fuss over nothing!
 

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Guess if it was me, I'd knock down a few of the loaded rounds and measure the consistancy of the powder charges. Then I'd load them back up in incrementally heavier powder charges and shoot 'em watching for pressure signs. If they made it back up to the original charge weight without any trama and if the charges that you pulled apart were consistant I'd shoot the rest without worry.

Next time you reload I'd start all over again since the components won't be the same
 
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