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Take a look at that Manton Flintlock!...... Modern styling at its best!

Russ...
 

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Don't normally clutter up the forums with a big picture post, but I do think these are pretty enough to take up the bandwidth.

Long story, but this pair ended up with me.



Not the same maker, but definitely in the same theme.
 

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Thank you. They really do balance quite well, and while i haven't shot them a bunch, have shot them.

These guns aren't made for long strings without a quick clean, in fact, better to clean after each shot (just a wet swab, then two dry patches). Probably due to the odd rifling (super-multi groove).
 

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It's good to hear you actually do shoot them. At least in my opinion.

That rifling looks like it could have been done by Marlin, as in "Micro-Groove".:D

Just kidding! I know one particular shooter who makes a great case for very shallow multi rifling with square bottoms, and he does it in such a way that there is very little doubt.... he does it on paper, at the range.

And, not one single person that has seen him shoot wants to argue the point.

Although I have always said I like deep-cut rifling, I have never personally owned, or had the opportunity to play with something like you have.
I believe I would welcome such an opportunity should it ever come my way....Like many other folks, I would like to know, beyond a doubt, if it was the rifling, or me.

Respectfully, Russ
 

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Suspect these were made for a different type of loading, at least they respond to different techniques.

Honestly, just from the tooling in the case set, got to wondering. Figure the stuff in the case was made to be used, but the charger was a mystery at first.

There is a charger on the end of a long rod...picture a little bell with a real long handle. That's filled with powder (about 21gr.), stood up, and the gun lowered onto the vertical charger. Then both the charger and the gun are flipped so that the gun now points up. Remove the charger.

that's the only way I can see it being used at all, and have to wonder why.

Patched ball is a very tight fit, tight enough to need the services of that wooden mallet to get started. Once started, can be rammed down with hand pressure.

You don't load them in a hurry.
 

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Part of the ritual, I'd guess. Wait a bit, wait some more.... Who's in a hurry to start shooting?? :eek:
 

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RussB makes reference to "very shallow multi rifling with square bottoms" being used with great success...ever look down the barrel of a US Navy 16"...same thing. They have excellent accuracy also.
Robert
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
I found this tidbit but don't really know how much it relates...

'On the continent, smoothbores were considered cowardly and rifled pistols were the norm. Rifled pistols at the standard short range of 20 paces were murderous thus in England and the U.S. the tradition of using smoothbore barrels emerged. This did not prevent expert gunsmith Joseph Manton from using very light "scratch rifling" that was difficult to detect from the muzzle but had an exceptional degree of accurracy.' (Neal and Back 1966,10,20,22; From Firearms: the life story of a technology - by Roger Pauly) I edited this a bit, sorry
 

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Yes, i read that before as a reason for smooth bores for dueling. English also frowned on distinct sights, finding "taking an aim" to be un-gentlemanly. it was the ritual that counted, most duels ended without a hit, firing the shot was good enough.\

However, in sections of the US with heavy French or German influence, the English rules were often ignored. "Scratch" rifling, usually hidden by a very long counterbore type crown, certainly was used. But remember, the pistols were loaded by the seconds, and they'd probably detect it... plus the injured party was given his choice of the loaded pair, so they both were rifled (just that one shooter didn't know it).
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I did have to replace one screw, and got a lesson in doing so. Were made with all screw slots ending up pointing along the long axis of the bore when fully tight. To replace the screw, had to find a slotless screw (thick head)...cut a temp. slot in the crew... lathe the head siameter to the right size... screw it in tight...make the long axis on the screw head...cut a slot along that mark... lathe/polish the hed down to remove the temp. slot... then ended up with a new screw that was pointing the right direction.


Know 98% of that was just for show, but i will say that having all the screws line up in the same direction certainly does let you know when something is coming loose.
 

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Nice touch with the screw slots lining up. Definately not something assembled grabbing parts from a bin.

Thanks for some education on dueling.
 
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