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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, Im in a spot.
Since we do a lot of demo, Ive got a ready supply of lead pipe flashing coming in all year. So Ive got a stack of pure lead squirreled away along with a bucket load of Hornady hard lead shot I stumbled across at a yard sale and Ive also put up some pure linotype. Wheelweights have been hard to come by but I finally have a line on where I might be able to lay hands on a 5 gallon bucket but for $35 when they have a full one.

What I need is a good Simple recipe for Lyman #2 alloy as Ive only got about 25 pounds left.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The #2 alloy is nine pounds of wheel weight lead plus one pound of 50/50 solder.

I understand that much, but getting there from where I am is what I was hoping to find out. Otherwise Im looking at shelling out cash for something I should be able to do myself from what I have or very close to it.
 

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Assuming your lead flashing is nearly pure,,,if you mix 50-50 with the lino you will come close to the same hardness of the Lyman #2
Lyman #2 is 90-5-5 and and reported to be about a bhn of 15. The 50-50 will get you in the neighborhood of a 92-6-2,,,,if the flashing is pure. Thats equivalent to RotoMetal's "hardball" and is said to be a bhn of 16. Wheel weights of the clip on type are about 96-3.5-.5 and about 11-12 bhn,,water dropped can run from 18-22 bhn. The hard lead shot if it is mag shot has 4-6% antimony,and in my mag shot runs about bhn14, but has no tin for good fillout. That with an ounce or 2 of 50-50 solder in 10 lbs for the tin, would be just a tad softer than Lyman #2.
You got some good alloy's to work with, and not difficult at all to adjust.

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks Dave, that means a little 50/50 solder will get me in the ballpark.

Yeah, the lead is pure. We demoed a number of big commercial jobs last summer and a few this summer and the guys are all hunting lead for me now. It goes to feed my cap and ball revolvers and I really need to put some time into more alloy like Lyman #2 because Im casting 500 grain bullets for my Pedersoli 1874 Sharps repro. That goes through the lead fast but wow is it fun. :D
 

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You won't need the solder if you just use the flashing and lino, only in the shot,,Lino in itself is 84-12-4 when new, but can be 85-11-4 for used,,,but solder is cheap enough and it don't take alot, so it's worth having on hand. you could experiment witht he flashing and the shot at say 50-50 with some tin added and get what some feel is near an ideal boolit too up 1500 fps. That would be about a a 95-2.5-2.5 and a bhn of 10-11. Pressure is the key, next to boolit fit!
Do you know what speed and pressure you ar going to be running those 500's?
you may not want or need an alloy quite that hard of the Lyman#2 or Hardball.
If you are running somewhat mild pressures, you still want the bullet to obturate to account for minor discrepencies of the bore length.,,, A general rule of thumb is hardness time 1422. That number is your desired mininum pressure. But then each rifle is un to it's own, So it's a good idea to paly around with the alloy and see what it likes. It could be it likes a 6-4 ratio of the flashing to lino. I know alot of guys mix 50-50 clip on wheel weights to pure lead also, with a once of 50-50 solder per 10lbs. I just prefer to keep my tin at 1.5-2% of the batch, although, those that cast straight WW's don't seem to have a problem with fillout, but I would add just a touch of tin myself. If you are looking for penetration I would stay harder, accuracy just takes some experimenting.
And yes those 500's go through a pound of alloy in a hurry!!!!
Dave
 

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PS,,on the shot,,,,, if it's just chilled shot, I'm not sure how much antimony is in it.
If you don't have a bhn tester, I would invest in one. when playing with some of the unkown alloys, it will give you an idea.
 

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I think the plain chilled shot is about 3% antimony. The main thing it has of value is up to a percent of arsenic which makes water hardening possible. Without it, chilling the shot wouldn't harden it. If you are making up an alloy you want to quench harden, then using some chilled shot in it is a good idea. One part in 10 or 20 is usually enough.

The alloy compounding problem is what you may remember from high school algebra as solving a system of simultaneous equations. Basically, if you pick three alloys of quantities, A,B, and C, and as long as each has a higher percentage of one of the alloy elements than you need and less of the other two in proportion, then a solution exists, such that the values of A+B+C=100%, and A% of lead plus B% lead plus C% lead equals your desired lead quantity, A% tin plus B% tin plus C% tin equals your desired tin quantity, and A% antimony plus B% antimony plus C% antimony equals your desired antimony quantity, all simultaneously.

I'll leave it to you to play with as you choose.

As to Lyman #2:

Linotype 41.67%
Lead 51.67%
Solder 6.67%

If the linotype has lost antimony to 86-11-4 as Onesonek sugessts, then:

Linotype 45.46%
Lead 48.18%
Solder 6.36%

You're not going to hit exact percentages with any form of scrap, so I'd round to the nearest percent and run with that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks Nick, onesonek, this helps too. Sadly I remember all that good Algebraic stuff as high school may be a ways back, college algebra isnt as far back. With the long weekend, Ive got time to do some work with it.
 
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