Shooters Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi everyone, I have a question about inletting a rifle stock. I'm making a stock for a S & W 1500 .270. My question is: How much does the action expand after shooting 4 or 5 round in a row? I'm inletting the reciever and i'm wondering if i should leave room for expansion. The book i've read doesn't say anything about leaving room for expansion. The original factory made stock has clearance between sides of action and the sides of the magazine. do I need to do this?
Thanks for any help,
Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
Hi Jim, welcome here!

Rules are simple, be nice and join in. As far as your question goes, I don't think you do (but I'm no smith, might want to ask your post be moved to the gunsmithing forum here). i think the whole point of bedding an action is to eliminate any clearance so your gun is tighter/shoots more precise, allowing clearance while inletting I unnecessary IMO. Again, that's just an educated guess, wait to hear what others say.

From what engineeringtoolbox.com tells me, if your action is 1" thick (solid) and the gun was in -40C (-40F) weather and shot until it hit 100C (212F) the action would expand *almost* .002". with those extremes, I doubt you have anything to worry about at regular temps and thicknesses.

What guns do you all own? Tell us about yourself, what do you like doing?

See you around the forum.


Matt M
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,267 Posts
[How much does the action expand after shooting 4 or 5 round in a row?]

As posted above, negligable.



[The book i've read doesn't say anything about leaving room for expansion. I'm inletting the reciever and i'm wondering if i should leave room for expansion ]

Not really - But there has to be certain areas left with clearance, both for accuracy and stock integrity (preventing splitting). See answers below.


[The original factory made stock has clearance between sides of action and the sides of the magazine. do I need to do this?]

In short, Yes & No.

The wood of the stock should ideally touch metal along both top sides of the barrel and the entire sides of the action - but not along the magazine sides or front.

The other parts that should be firmly/evenly bedded are:
the bottom of the receiver,
the rear face of the recoil lug,
the bottom/rear 3" of the barrel channel in the area of the barrel re-inforce, and
the entire trigger guard/floorplate metal.

There should be slight clearance at:
the front/bottom/both sides of the recoil lug,
the rear of the upper tang,
the bottom of the barrel (unless accuracy testing indicates barrel up-pressure just in back of the forarm tip is needed),
the front & sides of the magazine,
around both front/rear guard screws, and
the trigger mechanism.

FWIW, there are several good books available, that discuss in depth the inletting and bedding of Mauser-pattern rifles.

.
 

·
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
Joined
·
36,659 Posts
Some good advice. Contact at the tang may split the stock, so that one is critical.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys! that helps alot. I'm fairly new to guns accept for my hunting rifle. I have alot to learn as this project is drawing my interests. I love woodworking and i thought this would be a fun project. It's been alot harder than I thought it would be.
I'm still learning whats what on my rifle and was wondering,. Is the Tang the rear where the gaurd screw goes in? the books i'm reading don't tell me whats what. What and where is the "Tang" exactly?

Thanks again everyone with your help,
Jim
 

·
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
Joined
·
36,659 Posts
The tang is the rear of the action metal, on top. Basically, your right thumb will most likely lay on top of it when shooting (assuming you are right handed).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,267 Posts
The tang is the area of the receiver best seen with the bolt removed from the receiver/action, that is the upper/rearmost, behind the rear receiver bridge where the bolt handle root would lie with the bolt installed/closed.

Typically, the rear guard/action screw threads into it from below, through the rear end of the bottom metal and stock wood.

.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top