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Discussion Starter #1
 Just hoping to find someone with actual knowledge of what type of velocities / energy i can expect from 23gr. of 2400 behind a 240gr. jsp out of my 10 1/2 in. super blackhawk.  Any commentary much appreciated.                                                                                                                           CORRECTION 23gr. H110!!!!!!!!


(Edited by blackhawk at 1:17 pm on Jan. 12, 2001)
 

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Dear Blackhawk,

You have a nice gun.  I had one last year and had the bull barrel cut to 6 1/2" and it turned out great.  Anyway, to the load.  Unless I missed something, 23 gr of 2400 is generally considered to be 2-3 gr over max.  About 5 years ago I (just to see) loaded 22.0 gr of 2400 behind a 240 gr lead swc.  It was way, way over pressure.  Oddly enough the load was super clean and velocities were amazing (1400 fps out of a 5" bbl).  The cases were pounded out and never fired again.  With the 240gr jacked bullet your max load is somewhere under 21gr.  

For more velocity you might consider H-110 or 296 as they usually give more velocity for the same or less pressure.  Most loading manuals give 23-24 gr of these powder as max with a magnum primer.  Velocities will run around 1350-1400 fps in a 7 1/2" revolver.  

If you really want to go fast, try Marshall's 44 mag 250gr LFNGC bullet.   With H-110 it maxed out about 1550 fps in my 7 1/2" revolver and 1900 fps in my 16" rifle barrel.  Since I'm still pretty new to this bullet I suggest you consult Marshall for an exact load.  I topped out at 28.5 gr in a Star case.  With your long barrel you should be looking at around 1650 fps.  

Hope this helps.............  Bill M
 

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blackhawk, if you have those already loaded with the 23gr of 2400, DONT FIRE THEM THESE ARE TO HOT. ALSO THE LOAD THAT BILL HAS WITH 28.5 GR OF H110 IS WAY OVER ALSO W/250LFN. NOT SURE IF IT WAS A TYPE ERROR OR WHAT. I SUGGEST THAT YOU SHOULD GET A COUPLE OF GOOD LOADING MANUALS AND STUDY THEM WELL.  I DONT WANT TO SOUND RUDE HERE BUT LOADS OF THIS NATURE YOU MENTIONED ARE DOWNRIGHT DANGER LIMITS. PLEASE BE CAREFULL AND ASK QUESTIONS WHEN IN DOUBT. AGAIN DO NOT USE THIS DATA.       JIM.
 

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Thanks to Jim Lambert,
Thanks for the additional note Jim.  I should have said what you did about the 23 gr load of 2400.  Do not shoot it!  

I also should have made it clearer about Marshall's 250gr lfngc bullet.  The load, to the best of my skill is a max safe load in my test gun with my specific components.  The bullet is also quite unique compared to any other 240-250 bullet out there.  This load with any other non LBT lead bullet (a 240 gr swc for example) is at least 3 grains over max.  The 250gr lfngc bullet is far less invasive in the case than a swc and allows more powder with safe pressures.  Also, I am still pretty new to this bullet so maybe we can get Marshall to jump in and offer his expertise to keep us all on the right track.

Thank you again Jim for jumping in and reminding me to be more thorough.

God bless....................  Bill M
 

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hi bill, yes the lbt bullet is designed to allow the maximum in case capacity, i consider 26.5 w296/h110 max with a 250 gr lbt slug. in which are for strong guns only.  just my opinion.    jim.
 

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To Blackhawk!

I certainly hope you haven't loaded those .44-240g jacketed pills with 23.0g of 2400!  That is a problem that won't wait to happen!  OVERMAX BEYOND THE MAX!!  I wouldn't shoot those in any .44!  If you have loaded them, dig out the bullet puller!

As for the loads using our .44-250g LFNGC bullet, what Bill M. says concerning case capacity and bullet intrusion into the case is absolutely right!  If you compare the .44-250g LFNGC bullet to jacketed or other cast (swc) bullets of the same weight, the LFN compromises MUCH less space.  

The .44-250g LFNGC bullet only intrudes 0.295" into the mouth of the case when seated to the .450" NTC length crimp groove.  This equates to about the same case intrusion as a .44-200g Hornady XTP!  Combine the gained case capacity of the LFN over conventional 240-250 grain bullets along with a lower friction coefficient for the hard cast bullet, and you have the makings for a bullet with some very unique loading characteristics.

All this being said, I will tell all here that I have shot great numbers of these loaded with this load:

BTB .44-250g LFNGC/27.7g H110/WLPP/Federal Brass

Be aware that both Remington and Starline will have reduced case capacities due to thicker brass, and a change in primers with this load may spike pressures as well.  However, while being an upper end load, it is not an against-the-wall load.

Anything beyond this must be approached with much caution, discretion and attention to the individual characteristics of the firearm used to work up the load.  

Also, be aware that loads worked up now, in the winter can, and will behave much differently as temperatures increase through the spring and summer months!  What is safe in January when your shooting range is 26 degrees, can easily be well over pressure once amient temperatures reach 70 degrees!

If you will notice, whenever I post a load workup, especially one that I feel is at or near top end, I include the temperature at which the testing was done... very important information!  (worthy of a new thread here)

Keep these factors in mind, and enjoy.  But lastly, Blackhawk, DON'T SHOOT THOSE HOT LOADS OF 2400!

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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Discussion Starter #7
oops!  sorry about the error !  the powder is H-110 the primers are remington magnum pistol and rem. brass with 240xtps.  again sorry about the error and want to say thanks for the quick response and concerns.  Again you can never be too careful when labeling or checking loads!
 

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Blackhawk!

Glad to hear you weren't flirting with disaster!

I don't actually have any chrono data with the long barreled Ruger that you are shooting, but you can certainly count on a little more velocity than that from a 7.5" revolver.  

God Bless,

Marshall
 
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