Shooters Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

New to this site as I'm getting more and more involved in the guns/shooting world. First post but I'm hoping to learn more and maybe share what knowledge I can when able.

I recently purchased a K98 and am looking for some advice on preserving it and determining authenticity. The woman I bought it from said her late husband had brought it back with him from WWII to keep as a souvenir. I do not know how to properly ID these older guns however, for $200, I thought it would at least be a neat addition to my safe. I couldn't find any electro-pencil marks and all of the parts have the same number stamped into them (5011) though its very faded on the bottom of the stock. I've heard stories of people making fake K98s and selling them as authentic...?

There wasn't a ton of rust but the bluing is worn off in a few places and there is a small bit of pitting at the base of the barrel. I actually like the worn/weathered look but is there anything I should do to help preserve it? i.e. re-bluing, re-finishing stock etc.

Any help would be much appreciated--thanks!
Gun Rifle Wood Air gun Table
Wood Table Machine Furniture Hardwood
Monocular
Tool accessory
Metal Buckle
Gun Trigger Air gun Shotgun Revolver
Revolver Trigger
Shotgun Metal
Wood Hardwood Wood stain Plywood Floor
Tool Chisel Blade Knife
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
15,936 Posts
That is an authentic, late war M98 made by Waffenwerke Bruenn AG, Werk Bystrica.

I'd clean it with a gun solvent and 000 steel wool LIGHTLY. Wipe a dry as you can then put on a coat of paste floor wax. Let it dry and then wipe it hard with a cotton cloth. You can do that with wood and metal, but just lightly with the steel wool to take off any loose oxidation.
That's a nice find at a great price. It's only missing the sling and bayonet from being a complete example in decent shape.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 375Carp

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,847 Posts
Welcome to the Forum. Glad to see you here and hope that you post often. As has been noted in the previous post, you have and authentic WWII rifle that appears to have matching numbers and is in very good condition. You did well in this acquisition.

Surplus military arms such as your rifle are worth more if left in unaltered condition. My recommendation would be to carefully take the action out of the stock, clean the bore and apply a thin film of gun oil and gun grease to all metal surfaces. I would also apply a few drops of boiled linseed oil to the inside and outside of the stock and handgaurd. Than carefully reassemble the rifle. I would be careful what ammo is fired in that rifle and be aware that some of the imported military ammo might be corrosive and requires prompt and careful cleaning. All the best...
Gil
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That is an authentic, late war M98 made by Waffenwerke Bruenn AG, Werk Bystrica.

I'd clean it with a gun solvent and 000 steel wool LIGHTLY. Wipe a dry as you can then put on a coat of paste floor wax. Let it dry and then wipe it hard with a cotton cloth. You can do that with wood and metal, but just lightly with the steel wool to take off any loose oxidation.
That's a nice find at a great price. It's only missing the sling and bayonet from being a complete example in decent shape.
Great to hear and thanks for the reply! I should have everything here except for the floor wax, hopefully I'll have time to go pick some up tomorrow.

I'd like it to be displayed as complete (with bayonet and sling) but obviously they wont be original to the gun. However, I'd still like the finish to match showing their age. What's a fair price to pay for an "authentic" bayonet (with frog)? I see a lot on eBay ranging from $90-$250.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welcome to the Forum. Glad to see you here and hope that you post often. As has been noted in the previous post, you have and authentic WWII rifle that appears to have matching numbers and is in very good condition. You did well in this acquisition.

Surplus military arms such as your rifle are worth more if left in unaltered condition. My recommendation would be to carefully take the action out of the stock, clean the bore and apply a thin film of gun oil and gun grease to all metal surfaces. I would also apply a few drops of boiled linseed oil to the inside and outside of the stock and handgaurd. Than carefully reassemble the rifle. I would be careful what ammo is fired in that rifle and be aware that some of the imported military ammo might be corrosive and requires prompt and careful cleaning. All the best...
Gil
Thanks Gil, I appreciate the response. That's a good idea with the linseed oil as I noticed the inside of the stock and handguard felt REALLY dry and seemed like there was no layer of sealant or protectant.

I just ordered some brass for it and will work up some handloads to try to match the original MIL issue specs. Still doing my research to find a good bullet and powder to start with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Hello OP! I'm a new guy to this forum too but kinda old in so many other ways. One of them being firearms conservation and care. Your new to you dou 42 Mauser looks to be a Jim Dandy example of a WW2 bring back that has had the good fortune of being molested by Bubba and his cousins. That beautiful patina overall is what makes the collectors get wobbly knees and reach for their wallets with trembling hands. I ain't kidding. It took over 75 years to get those good looks so don't go and scrub them off now. Scrub the bore, yes, because you are going to shoot it, but the wood and metal parts just need to be rubbed with a coarse rag and Ballistol. That's what the German army always did, metal, wood, leather, everything. The loose stuff will come right off and repeated applications will clean out the pitting. All while you warm it up at the range for a bonus. The present condition would bring north of 1k in today's market so pause and reconsider that oooo steel wool. Four O bronze wool is a much better substitute because it's way to easy to get into 'cleaning her up' and remove that patina (same as burning 100$ bills in a fire) with steel wool. There are many that will argue but it's your gun and money.
I would also suggest getting some PPU 8mm heavy ball type ammo, both for the excellent brass and to experience the full power of the original type ammunition. It's akin to M2 Ball in a '03-A3 I think.
Preservation wax is a good thing too that has its place in the grand scheme of all things gun related. To each their own I say. Safe queens and foul weather hunting surely benifit from its use.
Enjoy your 'new' Mauser friend!
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top