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Discussion Starter #1
I recently got myself a Kel Tec PF9. Contrary to rumors, the one that I bought (traded for at a gun shop) new runs flawlessly. Yes, I know. It's not an expensive gun, nor is it crafted with very expensive materials. I have had several rim-fire handguns (both revolvers, and semi-auto pistols). I've owned a few different weapons in the .22 family. A .22 short, .22LR, and even a .22 WMR (Magnum). I love my rim-fires but I was ready for a center-fire again. I have owned one other center-fire handgun in the past. It was a solid .357 magnum Ruger GP 100, with a 5" barrel (all stainless).

As the years go by, I always find myself with guns that I love, like, and even some that I wanted to like (but had issues with). I'm not a wealthy man, so I usually never have more than a handful of firearms at any given time (sadly).

With that being the case, I traded in a gun to get this one. The gun I had would have been a great gun if it would have cycled ammo correctly, and didn't jam after running two mags through it. I did lose money or value on the trade, and knowingly accepted the trade on the premise that; I wanted a more reliable weapon that didn't have failure(s) to eject, feed, etc. Thankfully the PF9 that I traded for is so far flawless. Also note, I've been wanting a small 9mm for concealed-carry and the gun I traded had a 6" barrel.

I have ran about 120 rounds through this pistol without any failures whatsoever. However, this gun is a stepping stone. Because, it's not a known (reliable) gun; I am prepared for it to fail at some point in time. This isn't a big deal, parts are cheap from the manufacture. Kel Tec is known for having excellent customer service and the manual that came with the gun says that the company will fix issues for the original owner (me), should any occur. I'm decent enough at repairing my own weapons so I shouldn't have to take it to a smith if the occasion ever did arise. I do also plan on purchasing another small 9mm from a different manufacture, suggestions welcome (I prefer single-stack and compact). These will be daily concealed-carry weapons.

I plan to run thousands of rounds through this weapon on the range. My accuracy was not great at first and is only decent/good now. At 50 ft. had an 83% accuracy rating against a still silhouette. I am not able to make groups per clip/mag, as I would prefer. This is the main point of my long post.. experienced handgun enthusiasts, range shooters, amateurs, and pros alike... help me out here. What can I do to improve my accuracy?

My goal is accurate shots with a two handed grip from 50 ft. and closer. I am shooting from a standing position with a my natural shooting gait (feet at about shoulder width, slightly staggered). I've shot Ruger +P ammo, Tul ammo, Winchester FMJ white box ammo, and Remington JHP's as well. I'm a left-handed shooter and this is a blued/polymer weapon.

On a side note how do you guys/gals preserve bluing/prevent rust?

Thank you to the patient readers and to those with advice.
 

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About the only auto loading pistol I've ever owned that wasn't 100% reliable was a 1st Generation G17. That pistol would jam and experience all kinds of issues with factory ammo, even with the so called good stuff, but it would run flawlessly with my reloads.

If you don't reload that might be something to consider. Factory ammo is manufactured to a standard of one size fits everything, problem is not all firearms are created with the same dimensional and functional characteristics. This is where reloading can and often does solve common reliability issues. One thing is for sure. I'll trust my life to the reloads I assemble one at a time to any mass produced factory offering.

I preserve blued finishes by preventing it from rusting, and by applying a light coat of gun oil while in storage or not being fired. However, if it's a carry weapon it will unavoidably suffer holster rubbing which will rub the blue off in contact areas.

Maybe someone else will come along and offer some suggestions of how you can minimize holster rubbing. I wouldn't mind some tips, all my blued handguns exhibit some rub off from carrying.

SMOA
 

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Any gun carried regularly will have to be maintained just as regularly in order to prevent problems not only with corrosion but with reliable functioning. I have had good results using a "RIG-Rag," which is an oval of sheepskin with the wool still on it that is impregnated with "Rust Inhibiting Grease." I wipe the metal parts with this every morning before I holster the gun. Even if it hasn't been fired, the gun should receive a regular cleaning to remove dust and to replace oil or grease that is thickening with age. Dust will attract and hold moisture which will in turn cause rust. Thickened oil and grease will cause malfunctions, and anything that interferes with reliability should be avoided.

The pursuit of reliability includes acquiring a reliable firearm. Remember that you will be calling upon it to defend yourself in the "gravest extreme" as Massad Ayoob puts it. An extremely expensive pistol, though it may be of very high quality, is not a good choice because the police will take it away from you in the immediate aftermath of a self-defense incident. You may never get it back.

Do shoot the thing regularly to keep your own skills up and confirm that the gun is still working.

Best,

Trad A. Non
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thank you for your replies. These are great opinions and very good info. I will read over these from time to time, reminding myself that the experience of others can help me in the future. So far, I follow most of what has been mentioned in these replies and anything I am not already doing that you've mentioned; I'll start practicing. I do shoot as often as my time allows. I clean my guns regularly. I may eventually work with reloads but am not currently doing so due to the manufacturers warranty stating that using reloads in my Kel Tec PF9 would render the warranty void. I do however know a man that loads most of his ammunition for almost all of his guns. He is knowledgeable in this process, and when the time comes I'll most likely be learning hands on, in person, from him.

Also, for anyone reading this thread and these replies, please take note that indeed an expensive gun may not always be advisable if you're expecting to get it back after an incident where you may be defending yourself or others. I'm not suggesting that the most cheap and unreliable weapon is the solution. I am simply restating that any decent firearm should function per your standards, those standards should be flawless function as your life and the lives of your family and friends may one day depend on your weapon and your skill as a marksman.
 

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As far as rust prevention goes, keep it coated with a good gun oil, or if you can't do that, get a Glock pistol. I've owned my Glock 17 since 1989, and never have I seen any rust on it.
 
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