Shooters Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I picked up a .300 ultra mag for free from a buddy. The gun has seen better days but all and I don't think it's too bad. I've done some work on it that I'm not too sure about and I wanted to get some people's opions about weather or not I should fire it or not. I bore scoped the barrel and I found in the last probably 6 inches of the barrel there was a little pitting, and I unlike Aircraft, I can't seem to find a safe limit for corrosion, especially being that it's high powered round. I was thinking about getting the brownel's kit for cutting and crowing the barrel. I'm afraid that I'll loose not only accuracy but a ton of velocity due to the shear amount of powder that needs to burn before the round leaves the barrel. I think I screwed up when I bead blasted the gun. I of coarse plugged the barrel off and the chamber, but I bead blasted the rails that the bolt slides on, and then painted it with duracoat before I really thought about the fact that whole area is precision cut... Did I screw this gun up, do I just have an expensive piece of scrap metal?????? Any advise would be appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
542 Posts
Hi there ih8h, welcome to the forum. The rules are simple: be nice and join in. Read the stickies for board info.

Guns are precision instuments. I have a Remington Nylon 66 that i play with, but I don't fool around with other guns I have because I don't know what I'm doing. That said, experience is the best teacher, and you have to start somewhere. I can't answer your question (as noted above ;) ) but posting pictures would probably be a good start.

I would recommend having a professional look at if before you shoot it, just to be safe.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,404 Posts
Bead blasting the rails should have no bearing on the load carrying ability of the locking lugs as there inside the receiver behind the barrel. Hopefully you didn't do anything in the chamber end of the barrel and the receiver where the barrel screws. If not then you should be good to go. The bead blasting should help hold more lubricant on the rails for smoother operation??? Don't know for sure but seems plausable.

If your talking a 26" barrel cut down to 20" then you have basically a glorified 308 Winchester burning nearly twice the powder. You do need that barrel length to make the magnum part work.

I would clean the bore very well making sure there's no copper fouling. This will allow you to determine how rough the bore really is with the patches. I've shot many old military rifles with bores looking like sewer pipes but they shot supriseingly well.

If you concerned about shooting then fasten to some solid support and use a string to fire while seeking protection behind some solid object. Done this numberous times with questionable firearms without any problems.
 

·
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
Joined
·
36,710 Posts
You could lap the bore if it turns out to be an issue. Just a thought. Good luck....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,267 Posts
JMO, but borescopes impart more information than the average shooter needs to know, or can do much about.

Put the borescope away, clean the bore with a known copper removal agent, like Outers Foul Out II, and shoot it.

Beadblasting & Duracoating the action rails didn't do them any good, but hopefully not a whole lot of harm, either - I would use a good lube on the rails and cycle the bolt several hundred times while watching TV evenings to seee if things smoothed out.
Keep the lube from the locking lugs, OR thoroughly clean the action's lug recess' afterward.

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks

Thank you all for the info. I shoot about once a week, but it appears I've got tons to learn about working on rifles. Thanks again for the help.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top