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Right you are! The letter would be on the final header die just like on a .22lr case. Maybe they're just charging extra for the 'B'.
It would be interesting to sort through a box to see of all went through the same header die.
Consider just a minute the variations the primer maker can't control but through constant testing. The brass strip has a tolerance of thickness and thickness variations allowed. Same goes for the alloy, heat-treat and physical properties for the strip brass for the anvils. So, much of primer manufacture depends on vendors suppling good materials and the primer maker catching the bad before it gets made into primers.
The same applies to rimfire brass. Centerfire is made from 'slugs' so thickness doesn't make as much difference.
 

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Right you are! The letter would be on the final header die just like on a .22lr case. Maybe they're just charging extra for the 'B'.
It would be interesting to sort through a box to see of all went through the same header die.
Consider just a minute the variations the primer maker can't control but through constant testing. The brass strip has a tolerance of thickness and thickness variations allowed. Same goes for the alloy, heat-treat and physical properties for the strip brass for the anvils. So, much of primer manufacture depends on vendors suppling good materials and the primer maker catching the bad before it gets made into primers.
The same applies to rimfire brass. Centerfire is made from 'slugs' so thickness doesn't make as much difference.
Good information Jack!
Looking at quite a few past comments from several different forums and CCI input, it seems the general consensus is that CCI 'claims' they use their most experienced senior priming compound mixers and assemblers and selected (for consistency) components (cups and anvils) to manufacture the 'B' stamped benchrest primers. If so, to your point, maybe they select the brass strip to a tighter thickness tolerance, etc., etc.
Regarding your comment about centerfire brass starting as a 'slug'; In the late 80's I bought 500 Remington 300 Savage brass (Brownells, IIRC) to form brass for my 30 x 47 HBR hunter class BR rifle. I borrowed a tool that Guy Chism (originator of the 30 cal. '10X' bullets) had made to measure the wall thickness of cases above the web by 'pinching' (best word I could come up with!) the case wall between inside and outside as the case is rotated. I sorted all 500 into groups by .001" wall thickness variation. Anything over .003" variation I did not consider to be 'match quality' (or match worthy) and set them aside for general 'sporting/hunting' use. As I recall, I had no more than half (250) that met 'match' quality. Some varied as much as '005" - .006". To keep my 'match' cases identifiable/recognizable I used a spring loaded center punch to put identifying indents (1,2, or 3 indents representing .001", .002", or .003" wall thickness variation) on the bottom of the cases within the factory headstamp. The 1 indent cases were always 'first choice' for shooting in registered matches, also the fewest sorted out of the 500 cases! If you ask if I could tell a difference on the target (?), my honest answer would be 'I'm no more sure than how much benchrest primers help, but I thought so, and it was 'one more little variable' eliminated from the equation.
 

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The one ingredient common to all competition is CONFIDENCE. Fancy hammers don't drive any better nails but we can look 'professional' while trying. Not many golfer benefit from anything better than K-Mart clubs, but more money, fancy names, unique branding builds confidence and that sells more of them....at higher prices.

I did the BR thing backwards. I traded for a winning rifle with scope, ammo, components and tooling and then learned what they did by measuring what I already had. Case wall thickness, weights, turned necks, etc, etc. It was fun experimenting and seeing the difference on paper, too.
PITA for a varmint rifle and really not needed. The groundsquirrels fly away as their long green hearts go another with ammo put together carefully, but not sorted by DNA in the process.

I like Remington primers and got a good deal on small rifle Match a long time ago. Its all I use in the Deuces, Fireball and Cheapshots. Primer pockets are uniformed, flash holes deburred and uniformed, necks turned, trimmed, deburred and reamed. If a bullet lands different than where it should and the rifle is clean, no tricky wind to account for it, sometimes that case falls down a varmint hole so its never loaded again. ;)
 
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The one ingredient common to all competition is CONFIDENCE.
Case wall thickness, weights, turned necks, etc, etc. It was fun experimenting and seeing the difference on paper, too.
PITA for a varmint rifle and really not needed. The groundsquirrels fly away as their long green hearts go another with ammo put together carefully, but not sorted by DNA in the process.
Primer pockets are uniformed, flash holes deburred and uniformed, necks turned, trimmed, deburred and reamed. If a bullet lands different than where it should and the rifle is clean, no tricky wind to account for it, sometimes that case falls down a varmint hole so its never loaded again. ;)
That pretty well sums up the different requirements in precision between varmint hunting and benchrest competition. If you miss your ground squirrel, you take another shot at that, or a different one, and 'toss' the offending case down a hole. In competition, that case just took you out of the winner's circle, there is no 'do over', or hole to toss the case into, only the wailing wall and crying towels! :cry:;)
 

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Maybe we need a Philosophy .177 forum! You've hit on the difference between competition and recreation, to me. I've shot a lot of competition and done well, but its 'work' rather than pure enjoyment. Having said that, I have to have an element of competition otherwise there's other things to do than shoot. I compete against myself many times and like to have 'something riding' on every shot, whether it be lunch, a beer or who opens the next gate.
Shooting a really accurate rifle as a varmint rig is, to me, like taking a mountain road trip in a high performance car. You have the benefits of performance without the pressure of a race.
I shot a $10K pigeon one time and decided that much pressure was not good for me, but some thrive on it.
 

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I shot a $10K pigeon one time and decided that much pressure was not good for me, but some thrive on it.
I'm not a betting man, rather spend the money I know I have on something I want (or need) than risk having nothing for the effort. The problem with betting is there is always a loser, one way or another. If you think the $10K pigeon shot was too much pressure on you, think of the outcome of the bet for the pigeon!:eek:;)
 

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Crooked Creek hit the process difference correctly. I've been told the same thing by the makers and seen it written out elsewhere. These are just primers made by their most experienced people. Sometimes that pays dividends, but sometimes you get a new guy being extra careful to prove himself who winds up turning out the better ones, or you get an experienced person who had a bad night or is so bored they can't work up to their potential. Only shooting tells you for sure. I've seen more than one table put up by someone for whom the match primers did worse than standard. You just have to try them and see what they do for your loads. By buying them, you are probably playing the odds, as it is more likely the experienced folk will do better. It just isn't guaranteed to be so every time.
 
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