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Discussion Starter #1
I have used the pot scrubber on the brush with great success and the flitz has made cleaning easier. Now I don't have lead in the barrel. It's in the throat. I guess the area at the back of a revolver barrel is the throat? Anyway this lead I have not found a tool to get at it. Is there an easy way. Also I get a line in the cylinder that is hard to get out. The patches are hard to push through also. Nothing I have done so far has got this completely clean. Any thoughts.
 

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Beartooth Regular
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Hi, Chief:
  Marshall told me to push the brush & potscrubber through and work the scrubber into a bit of a ball. Then pull it back into the throat (forcing cone) and spin it around. It takes a while, but it works. (Marshall's better at it than I am.)

  Try spinning an oversized brush in the cylinder with a slow speed drill or drill press. A .375 brush worked in my .357, which was badly leaded when I bought it.

Bye
Jack


(Edited by Jack Monteith at 9:20 pm on July 28, 2001)
 

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If I get some lead build up on the rim of the forcing cone, I too use the "scrubby ball" but I spin-scrub going in from the breech end at an an angle (you'll need to angle in from the left side and then the right side of the open frame).  Just my experience but I've found this easier and quicker (in my pistol) than going in from from the muzzle end (forcing cone rim only).

Chief Rid - Does the cylinder line you querried about apply to only one cylinder or all of them?  Can you describe the line?

(Edited by Alan at 7:56 am on July 29, 2001)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
From the back of the cylinder looking in there is a definite change in the front 1/3 of each cylinder. I assume this is where the cartridge ends and the bullet starts out. I don't know if this is just fouling or ther is some reason for a machined difference. I have a cylinder brush but I used carb cleaner to clean it and the brissels are falling out.

Does this help any Alan? Thanks
 

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Hi, Chief RID:
  The cylinder does step down at the end of the case, from .379"+ to .357"+ for a .38 Special. You can get a build-up of carbon and lead there, but if all the steps look even and clean, it should be O.K.  If you shoot short cases in a long chamber (.38 Special in a .357 Magnum, for example), you can get a real ring of crud there.

  A kettle of boiling water cleans brushes better than anything that comes in a can. You can be sure all the ammonia from those high powdered solvents is GONE (your nose knows <!--emo&:)--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=':)'><!--endemo-->).

Bye
Jack
 

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Chief Rid -

The “line” Jack described is what I think you are seeing also (ring around the chamber wall when viewed from the cylinder face).  You say that a patch is difficult to get through this area.  If you are using a tight fitting jag with a doubled thickness patch it could be difficult to push through.  Have you tried a standard sized patch with a slotted tip?
 

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Something that I've found works very well for removing lead from the face of cylinders and the inside of the chamber throats is this mixture:

<ul><li>one part hydrogen peroxide
<li>one part distilled white vinegar</ul>

This will literally dissolve lead!  Drop a lead bullet into the solution, and overnight much of it will literally be eated away!  There have been reports of folks using this and getting some adverse reactions to their blued finishes.  I have used it for many years without any hint of problem, but I'm only one person, so be advised that it can damage a blued finish.  If you have a stubborn lead deposit somewhere, this will remove it!

Use with care!

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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Chief RID,

In reference to using potscrubber material, certainly an economical method, but I find I also get excellent results with he Lewis Lead Remover. This item includes brass mesh screens for the barrel and a separate cone shaped device used for the forcing cone. And a complete kit costs about &#3614.

I think I've tried about every thing there is, and the various methods usually work well, but sometimes, even with my very best efforts, I can still see a little lead in the groove up against the land. My best success for getting absolutely all the lead, regardless of the area in the barrel is using the Lead Out III. For lead, it only takes 10 minutes to operate and about 5 minutes for me to set it up.  On the expensive side, but it does get it all and without any risk that I'm aware of.

Dan
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You guys are the best. Allen the ring is in all of the cylinders and I do shoot some special in it. Less and less now but I have shoot a lot of them. I will get this out with one or maybe all of the techniques y'all suggest. It was good to find out that the cylinder does neck down some. Thanks again.
 
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