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What is good for getting a bad case of leading out of a barrel?

Nim
 

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A "wad" of copper or brass shavings from a drill press pushed trough the bore will get alot of it.

Lots of methods really. Softer than the steel of the bore. Harder than the lead.

Many solvents and oils will "wick" under/between the lead and steel given time to do so.

Heat and cold can also be used to your advantage.

You might also try the "search function" of this board to find similar questions.

Cheezywan
 

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Proper fitting gas checks will bring out quite a bit of leading.
Corrosion X sprayed in a barrel will wick under as Cheesywan says and will allow the lead to be taken out with a tight fitting patch.
I have an Outters Foul Out and I use it on guns “new to me.” The Foul Out will clean a barrel.
 

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It depends

I have gotten very good results in removing leading by using JB Bore Cleaner on a brush. Remington Bore Cleaning on a patch around a brush works well. Finally, a piece of Lead Wiping Cloth around a brush really does a great job. Hope this helps. All the best...
Gil
 

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In addition to JB'a bore polish get some fine steel wool and wrap it around a bronze bore brush and stroke away with bore cleaner. I use my own blend made out of 4 parts GM top engine cleaner and 1 part Janitor's strength ammonia applied to bore brush. Stroke 10 times and reapply. Finish with patches of bore cleaner and finally rubbing alcohol to clean out all residue.
 

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I seem to be the only one here who's tried Wipe Out No-Lead. It does work. The directions have you put a wet patch in and wait a while for it to react, then patch it out. I did this recently with a Smith K-38 I have. I think I let it sit an hour. The lead turned into a sort of chalk-textured black crud resembling carbon, and pushed out with a patch.

I think Slim's trick with Corrosion-X can also be pulled off with a squirt of PB Blaster (if you can stand the smell), or a soak in Kroil or Gunzilla (which are easier on the nose).
 

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Depends, .22 is one thing, a bbl that has seen both leaded and jacketed bullets is another, BP is another. I use a Birchwood Casey lead free cloth on 22 and BP, works great. For bbls that have seen jacketed or a combination I use Outers "Foul-Out" and/or "Butch's Bore Shine" let it soak a lot(bbl down on a cloth) patch it out and soak it down again until the patches come clean, a little brushing after the soak doesn't hurt things. JB bore paste can be used in either but I try to be very judicious in it's use as it is an abrasive. Good luck with your project!
 

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Boretech Eliminator is another favorite of mine. It attacks copper faster than the ammonia-based cleaners (I've tried them all), but also gradually etches lead bullet alloy. I stuck a cast bullet in it overnight one time, and the submerged part came out matte and clearly attacked. I was told it acts on the tin in the alloy, but don't have that from the horse's mouth, so take it with a grain of salt. It also works well on carbon and even is a good cleaner for corrosive primer residue. It's one of the few that truly does it all. It doesn't hit lead as fast as No-Lead and doesn't hit copper as hard as KG-12, but neither of those does everything.
 

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And for the absolute worst in leading the answer is very simple. Even when all else will not work mercury will. Mercury just dissolves the lead away. I’ve used it when there is a very thick layer where you can’t even see the lands of the rifling. Just block the barrel and fill it with the mercury, leave it for about 2 or 3 minutes and pour it out, at worst you may have to do it a couple of times.

There is no scrubbing, just pour it back into a glass jar for next time. Wipe the barrel out afterwards and finish your normal cleaning. When the mercury gets dirty with all the lead it’s removed then take a bit of sticky tape and wrap it around something with the sticky side out. The tape is used to pick up the lead which is just like a fine powder floating on the top. The mercury seems to last for ever.<O:p</O:p
 

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. . . leave it for about 2 or 3 minutes and pour it out, at worst you may have to do it a couple of times. . .
You won't have to do it twice if you leave it for 15 minutes the first time. That's what I used to. The main problem is some of the liquid mercury gets caught up in the amalgam matrix. When your brush it out, I number of teensy little mercury beads wind up spraying all over the room.

Try the No-Lead I mentioned two posts ago. It, likewise, turns the lead into a different compound that brushes right out. Takes a little longer, but not enough to matter. Cheaper than mercury, too.
 

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Dry brush the bore several times. Mix up a solution of 50/50 white vinegar and hydrogen peroxide. Plug barrel and pour mixture in and let stand for 15-20 minutes while it disolves the lead. The solution will turn a gray color in the barrel as it eats away the lead. After the initial application pour solution out and repeat the dry brushing and new solution. Repeat as necessary until solution no longer turns gray. Finish cleaning barrel as usual as if there had never been any lead in it.
 
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