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Is there a practical way to practice shooting at moving targets? I have taken shots at two moving deer now, one barely walking and one at a trot. In both cases, I have been surprised at how far off the point of impact was as a result of the movement. I guess my brain still wants to think of bullet flight as basically instantaneous, especially at ranges as close as a hundred yards. How do you learn to judge the amount to lead the game when it is moving?
 

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Get your deer to stop, there are various ways. A grunt call works well but better yet is something you do naturally while you are sighting down your scope so that when the deer stops momentarily you're ready to squeeze. I have taken very few moving shots but the ones I did take were withing 50 yds and the deer was just walking and there was no need to lead it at all. The problem with shooting moving deer is that it's very easy to lead right into brush, limbs, etc.
 

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Are you shotgunning deer, or with centerfire rifle? Regardless, a couple suggestions for you: Go out after coyotes, and you'll usually get plenty of running shots. If shotgunning, could be a challenge getting in range, but if with rifle, you'll get plenty of opportunities. It will help to have a buddy calling your hits. This the best practice I can think of, unless there is a range in your area with moving targets?

Even going out after ground squirrels or rabbits with a 22 LR will help your judgement and technique, even though velocity will be quite different.

Lastly - and similar with the velocity aspect - shoot some trap and skeet. These too will help with your swing and technique, and judgement of relative velocity and distance.
 

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I agree about using shotgunning as practice for running game, it difinitely helps. My long time hunting friend likes to swing ahead of the animal, keeping his rifle moving at approximately the same speed and when he has the desired lead, he fires.
This technique has never worked for me and I prefer an "overtaking" method. I swing onto the running animal from behind, with my rifle swinging much faster than the target. As my sights cross the vitals, or just ahead of them, I pull the trigger with the rifle still moving.
Both of us have had good success shooting at running pigs with our different techniques. You do get used to certain rifles though. This morning I shot two pigs on the trot with my new .35 Remington - hit them both a bit too far back. Guess I'm used to the faster locktime and flightime of my .260 Rem!!
 

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If you shoot a shotgun regularly then you have the ability to keep both eyes open. It is a bunch easier to do the judging with both eyes open.

If you have the oportunity to go to a shooting school, do it before you develope bad habits that you will need to unlearn.

If you are talking centerfire rifle, if you have sights on it use them for a while. Using iron sights and keeping both eyes open will give you a picture of where your sights are in relation to the impact. It may be expreme, but shoot some rabbits with your big rifle. If you are going to take vacation, spend money on tags, gas, and the latest gizmo you gotta have, the cost of ammo on some bunnies is miniscule.

You can mount a scope later and you will be amazed at how much you are "pointing" wi it and connecting.

Truth is, you gotta do it. .22 or 30-06 it will happen.

p.s. do while you are still youn(i hope) it is true about old dogs and new tricks!!!!!!!!!
 
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