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I got a set of .300 Weatherby Lee collet dies in a trade. From what I gather, it is a neck sizer only. Does anyone here have experience with this type of Lee product? Will it do as good a job as the standard neck-sizer that would come with my Redding set if it were a 3-die set?
 

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I've not used Lee's "Collet Dies" but, according to Lee's website, they not only size the neck down to firmly hold the bullet but they squeeze the neck against a mandrel which is supposed to help the neck thickness be concentric, therefore aiding accuracy.

I doubt you could tell a difference, compared to a regular neck sizing die, without a very accurate bench rest rifle but if you were already planning on only necksizing, the Lee collet die should work great.

If you aren't decided on neck sizing vs. full length sizing... That's a whole other topic with a debate sure to ensue.
 

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It will probably be better than the Redding die. I have used The Lee Collet dies on 22 Hornet and 30-30 which like your 300 Weatherby, do not headspace on the shoulder. They work best in this situation because after your brass is fired in your chamber the next load in that case will headspace on the shoulder. It will probably give you better accuracy. It will also greatly reduce the amount of stretching of the case from firing the round. With the use of the collet die, I very seldom have to trim my cases. The 22 hornet and 30-30 are both prone to case stretching because they headspace on the rim. Your Weatherby headspaces on the belt which is essentially the same thing. When you resize your brass two things happen. You push the shoulder back to the original position and when the expander ball comes out of the case mouth, the case stretches. With the collet die, you don't do either to your brass. The only downfall is that you have to use the cases in the chamber they were fired in.

Sixgun
 

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I had a lot of trouble with my collet die when i started using it for my 25-06. I sent the die back and Lee replaced it at no charge.

I've had much better luck with the new die. I use a Forster benchrest seater and with that combination the bullet is almost always under .001" total indicated runout.

One of the tricks I've found using the Lee collet die is cases resize much more consistantly if the necks are anealed. When using the die I push it into the die twice. Resize, give the case 1/2 turn and size again. When withdrawing the case from the die you should feel a sight drag of the neck on the mandrel.
 

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" Does anyone here have experience with this type of Lee product? Will it do as good a job as the standard neck-sizer that would come with my Redding set if it were a 3-die set?"

I do, several of them. And I needed no BR rifle to see the difference. They are, IMHO, the BEST neck dies for factory rifles on the market, at any price and by any maker. In fact I haven't used my conventional neck dies except to demonstrate the difference since I bought my first collet die years ago.

The collet die is not a bone simple, "push the case in, pull the case out" thing like others. It has a moving part (!) and that means a small learning curve. Those willing to take the time to learn to use it will be rewarded. Those unwilling to learn to use it will be better served with simplier, more conventional designs including those with bushings.

The Collet Die can be purchased seperate or as part of Lee's three die "Delux" set.
 

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I doubt you could tell a difference, compared to a regular neck sizing die...

My bad... I should rephrase that, since I've not used Lee's Collet Die, to say "I don't know if you could tell a difference".

--
 

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I'm impressed with Lee's Collet neck-sizers. If I cannnot get a deluxe die set in a certain caliber (which includes the collet die), I always order it on the side. They're well worth the $11 or $12 they cost.

As mentioned previously, the collet squeezes the neck against an appropriately sized mandrel. This ensures two things: concentricity and it prevents the collet from squeezing the neck too small. I do what MontyF does (press, then lower a little and spin the case, and press again) only I spin and press three times. With practice, this happens quickly and doesn;t slow up the sizing stage from case to case.

If you get one and think it's not working, it may be that the collet is stuck inside the die. This happens when the collet, which is free-floating and protrudes below the base of the die, is pushed up into the die without a case inside. When I got mine, I was playing with it and gently rasied the ram, not realizing I was pushing the collet up into the die without a case in the shellholder. Taking advice from this forum, I took the die apart and "unstuck" the collet....a 40 second job. As with any new die, it helps to clean them and shine the collet with a little 0000 steel wool before use.

As others said, this die takes a little practice to get a feel for it.
 

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The Lee collet die is a great neck die.
However in 300Wby you would probably get max 2 reloads before the cases start getting stickey in the chamber on extraction if neck sizing only. I had this problem with my 7mmRM, and switched over to Partial Full Length Sizing.
 

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I agree. If it were me, I would also order a Pacesetter set for your caliber. That will include (IF you don;t already have them) a bullet seater and a factory crimp die, and it will give you the full-length sizing die. You can use the neck-sizer until the full-length sizer comes in, but I think you'll eventually need to size it full-length, and every so often then on.
 

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The true purpose of the collet die is so you can maintain the same amount of neck pressure on the bullet..You can set it for a tighter or loser neck tention.This way you get the same burn rate and release pressure at all firing's....Like the above note says..You have to learn how to use this die in order to get full benifit from it....Festus
 

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The Lee collet die's are a steal and perform as well or better than just about anything else out there. In my 300wby I haven't had any problems with sticky cases, I don't full length size very often. I don't suggest using the factory crimp die or any other crimp die in a bolt action rifle if you don't need it-just shortens case life.
 

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Lee Collet neck sizing dies....

I use them in several calibers and think they are an excellent product. I am convinced that cases neck sized with the Lee CDs give noticeably longer case life then conventionally neck sized brass. The reason (IMHO) is because the brass is only worked one way with the CDs as opposed to two ways with typical neck sizer dies. Now if Lee would just wake up to the fact there's a lot of 221 Fireball shooters out there and start making CDs in that caliber.....
 

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Rickster, have you called Lee about the 221 Fireball? They might make something up for you, even if it costs a tad more...
 

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The Lee design is a successful innovation. The mandrel prevents the formation of the "dreaded donut" on the inside of the shoulder and neck junction, so you never need to use an inside reamer to clear that out. Redding's latest is a sliding sleeve neck sizer, and that might keep up with the collet die, but will cost a good bit more. I think Lee simply hit a home run with this design idea. Do keep the necks stress relieved (annealed) as suggested earlier.
 

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No Browning, it is not necessary to crimp at all, whether full-length sizing or neck sizing. "Beneficial" depends on your experiences with "crimped" bullets at the range. Some of my loads shoot better with the bullet crimped moderately. Others, so far as it appears, make no improvement if crimped or at least no noticeable change in accuracy.
 

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German gun magazin "Visier" did a test of the prime neck sizing dies (forster, redding, rcbs) and the lee neck sizer. Lee did produce by far the least runout.

They explained it with the fact that on the conventional dies you put an axial force on the more or less unsupported case. This is not the case with the lee. Lees way is free of any axial stress on the case.

My reloads made with the lee collet die have less runout than the Winchester Supreme Factory ammo. This is measured with the RCBS Case Master.

Fritz
 

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If it is not too much of a problem, could some of you supply me with some photos of your Lee crimped cases....both rifle and handgun cases? I have been trying to make a point to a fella on another forum, about "heavy" crimping with the Lee Crimp dies, and I would like to have some photos to show. Any help here would be appreciated. Thanks! FT
 

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StretchNM / I've used the custom Lee service for some collet dies in K-Hornet but the cost was over double the standard calibers. That's why I'm getting by with my RCBS neck sizer until Lee adds the 221 FB to their standard die list. I minimize neck stretching by cleaning the inside case necks and then lubing with imperial die wax. Works OK, but not nearly as good (or fast) as the Lee CDs...
 
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