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Discussion Starter #1
Just wondering.................... How many on this site would say that they began loading with the Lee Loader? If so, for what cartridge? How many still like to use one at least occasionally? I did not begin on one, but over the years, I have purchased several and like to use them every once in a while. They can be a relaxing "Step back" in time. Great tool for what it is. Everytime I do use one I get amazed of how good quality ammo that they can turn out..................................
 

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I started on the Lyman 310 tool. In the about 1968 everyone seemed to using the Lee loader for some of their loading. I have quite a few and tend to use the .308, .30-30 and .25-35 the most today. Back in the early 1980's when times seemed to be pretty tough I loaded a lot of standard velocity .38 Special on the Lee loader. I still use the Lee hand bullet sozers quite a bit. Also the powder dippers for mid range loads you are right in saying the Lee loader is relaxing.
 

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I loaded a bunch of 10 gauge 2 7/8 inch black powder loads with a Lee Hand loader back in the early 80's. I have a Lefever F Grade that I liked to shoot from time to time. Killed a few doves with these and broken a few clays. I still have 12-15 left from the original 100 I loaded. Shot a few a couple of years ago and they still go "bang". I also have a 25-06 Lee Bench Rest hand kit. It did a super nice job. I think I paid $10 or so for the shotgun loader and around $35 for the bench rest set. I have no idea where the 10 gauge loader is...must have been misplaced during a move. The bench rest set went untouched for over 30 years and some of the more precision parts rusted from the Texas Gulf Coast humidity. My bad for not storing it inside.

10 gauge shells.jpg lee bench rest loader.jpg
 

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I started reloading back in 1965 using a Lee Loader, for reloading my .222 Rem. Few years later, I bought an R.C.B.S. Jr Press which I still have and loading several calibers with it.
 

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I started reloading with a Lee Loader in .30-06. Over the years I have purchased other loaders for my pistol cartridges. I also have used eBay as a source for Lee Loaders for 12/16/20 gauge shotshells as well as a set for the .410 bore. Nowadays these all mostly sit on the shelf as modern presses are more efficient.
 
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Never loaded rifle rounds but still have my 20 and 12 gauge Lee Handloaders. Started at 12, 3 years before my father would let me venture out alone to hunt ducks. Of course I had to load his shells as well. I remember later on we would let a group of older guys have the best spot on the marsh opening day because they shot and missed quite a bit. That meant a bunch of plastic base wad empties would be floating around for reloading. We could only afford cheap paper hull shells that did not do well in wet Florida.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I started on the Lyman 310 tool.
Didn't even know about the 310 until about 5 years ago. I have bid on the tool or dies many times on E-bay, but they usually go for a lot more than I am willing to pay. Other than in pictures, I have never seen one but from everything I've heard or read, they are great tools. I almost got one of the Lee hand presses a while back, but decided that I really didn't need one. I often like to use the smaller easier to store tools, but I am sure that I would not want any of those for my full time use.
 

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My first re-loading was with a 16 ga Lee Loader. My first centerfires were done with Lyman 310 Tong Tools. I bought a Rockchucker in early 1968 (entire kit was $22) and have used it ever since.
 
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All students at CST got half off wholesale on all RCBS equipment and Fred Hunnington delivered the orders personally in his big Cadillac. I got press, 25-06 dies, and a shell holder.
I'm sure it paid off for him. In 1970, I set up the reloading section at the gunshop I worked at. That first stocking order was about ten grand.

We did have it good, though. Military Nat Match brass was a nickle each, primers $.85/100, Sierra 117gr SPBT were $4.35 a box and powder from Hodgdon was $.53 a pound.
 

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HAve used them,were the first "hand me down" loading tools...did learn a lot...most important being that it's often not the tools, but the care in using them that really matters.
 

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When I started reloading I was young and had no experience at all. My dad was a shooter but never reloaded so I was on my own and unsure if it was something I wanted to do. I got a Lee Loader in a box for my 3006 and started loading. Later I got one for my 357, then 44 magnum, and 20 gauge. When I finally decided that I was going to reload for the rest of my life I got a Rock Chucker press and dies, shell holders and other necessities. I got more gear as the need arose. I still have the Lee Loader kits for 12, 20, 410, 44M, 357M, 3006, 3030, and more. I may need to use them some day but I am happily loading on my two presses and using all the gear I have acquired over the years.
 

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I started reloading in 2014 using the Lee Loader in 223 Rem for my bolt gun. Wasn't sure I'd like it, so went as low budget as possible. The accuracy from my very first attempt was astonishing, much better than factory ammo. I was hooked.
 

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All students at CST got half off wholesale on all RCBS equipment and Fred Hunnington delivered the orders personally in his big Cadillac. I got press, 25-06 dies, and a shell holder.
I'm sure it paid off for him. In 1970, I set up the reloading section at the gunshop I worked at. That first stocking order was about ten grand.

We did have it good, though. Military Nat Match brass was a nickle each, primers $.85/100, Sierra 117gr SPBT were $4.35 a box and powder from Hodgdon was $.53 a pound.
I certainly remember those prices on reloading supplies. Back then reloading was a very inexpensive hobby and one could save money by reloading. Not today though!
 

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I started way back in the day with a Lee® Loader in 30/30 Winchester®, Hornady® #3060 170gr JFP bullets, and two IMR® powders; 3031 & 4064. It produced loads that were EXCEPTIONALLY ACCURATE! I still have that loader.
 

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i started loading in '91 and it was a lyman turret. i loaded the rcbs 30-30 and '06 and went from there. a few years years ago, i decided since i only use one hole, a signal stage lee classic press is what i need. i also bought a lee auto prime back in '91 and now it doesn't do large rifle priming. the auto prime needs a lrp spring, but
its ok, the classic press has a large arm primer.

 

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My reloading began in 1969 with a Lee Loader, one pound of Bullseye, 50 assorted 38 Special cases scrounged from the local police range, 100 CCI primers, 200 generic cast 158 gr RN bullets, my plastic mallet and a 6"x18" log. I didn't know any reloaders and I was on my own so I researched at the library. I pounded out good shootable ammo for nearly a year before I got a press, a Lee Challenger. I like Lee Loaders and now have 8 kits, for my handguns, and rifles, along with 4 presses 12 die sets and 1.83 metric tons of assorted reloading tools. Occasionally I'll get out a kit and pound out a few rounds. A couple weeks ago I was in my shop and found some brass I hadn't put away (45 ACP small primed) and decided to play and I pounded out about 20 rounds. Great fun and extra satisfying...
 

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Started with RCBS loading kit and dies for 308. Over the years, graduated to Lee because I found that lee offered the accessories that any reloader graduates to as he looks to make hos reloading more efficient- Powder measure, trimming tools, collet neck dies, etc, and they were way more reasonably priced than the competition . It's not cheap stuff, it's well made and does what it's designed to do, at a good price. I'm still using lee, and have just ordered some more stuff, LEE, and waiting for it to arrive.
 
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