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Discussion Starter #21
Lee Loader in .270 in 1971. I was 16 and quickly learned about case necks stretching.
Neck stretching? Is this an issue with the Lees in rifle cases? I've never heard of that. Don't think that I have any other than straight walled pistol cases.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Maybe I should have looked before posting, but I just found this similar thread from 2004. Interesting that so far only 1 that contributed to this thread did so on that one. Many in the other one also enjoyed digging up those old memories of early stages of reloading.
 

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Maybe I should have looked before posting, but I just found this similar thread from 2004. Interesting that so far only 1 that contributed to this thread did so on that one. Many in the other one also enjoyed digging up those old memories of early stages of reloading.
2004, thats like the stone age, man!!!!! 😂 😂
 

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my first reloading was done with a Lee Loader in 38 Spl and cast 158 gr. LRN's and Unique sometime in the late 70's. Very mild, but very accurate in the Ruger Security Six I had back then.
 

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Davey's Chuck Wagon is still there! But The Rally beer joint across the street is gone.
 

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Don't know about right now. It was there the last time I went by the CST to drop off some guns to have worked on. I hope it survives this Chinese Flu, my favorite burger joint has already gone under. I kinda thought that anyone who'd gone to CST would know Davey's.
So as not to derail this worthy thread, it seems to me that Lee has trimmed the number of calibers available in the basic Lee Loader. I used to have one in every caliber I owned, but that's not possible now days. The best groups I ever got out of my .25/06 were loaded with a Lee Loader, but following the load data card in the box it was 10 grains lighter than my normal handloads. But they shot one hole groups. I used to load with the Lee on my kitchen table, worked real well until I got married. After the second or third time I got a little heavy handed with the primer seating and it went off, I found a nicely wrapped Texan cast iron press and reloading kit on my birthday. I gave the press to my cousin, but I still have the scale. It has an oil dampened beam and holds it own with any of them.
 

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A former student of mine sent me a picture of himself eating a Davey's cheeseburger about two years ago. I hope its still there. It's one of the few remaining 'chrome rail car' diners and a fixture on W. Colfax.
 
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I started borrowing a Lee loader from a guy, then bought myself the "Anniversary Edition. Have been using it ever since.

Cheers
 
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years ago it was impossible to find 7x30 waters case. my gunsmith(RIP) told me to use 30-30 cases. so i did, i put the 30-30 case into a 7x30 waters fl die and wouldn't you know, i had a 7x30 waters made from a 30-30!!!!! i make alot of cases, 8x57 to 9.3x57, 221 fireball to 20 vartarg, 30-30 to 35/30-30......i do this on a lee classic. i have a rem m14 in 30 rem and a whole lot of 30 rem cases, but i know you can do 30-30 case(lathe, which i don't have) to 30 rem. theres a whole lot of wildcat cases that can be done with a lee classic(or rockchucker or lyman...)

its really quite impressive of what you can do to a press.
 

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My start was with a Lee Loader for 30-30. I was in the Air Force, living in the barracks. I was shooting a Contender so the Lee Loader would easily load a day's worth of shooting in an evening. I apparently had a thing for single shots, picked up an XP-100 in 221 Fireball, and a second Lee Loader. I used them for several years until I had a place where I could set up something more substantial.
 

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seen one but from everything I've heard or read, they are great tools. I almost got one of the Lee hand presses a while back, but decided that I really didn't need one. I often like to use the smaller easier to store tools, but I am sure that I would not want any of those for my full time use.
Didn't even know about the 310 until about 5 years ago. I have bid on the tool or dies many times on E-bay, but they usually go for a lot more than I am willing to pay. Other than in pictures, I have never seen one but from everything I've heard or read, they are great tools. I almost got one of the Lee hand presses a while back, but decided that I really didn't need one. I often like to use the smaller easier to store tools, but I am sure that I would not want any of those for my full time use.
I have a 310 tool and dies for the 45-70. I used to drop them into my shooting box along with ten cases and bullets, powder, Lee dipper and primers and head to the range. It made for a relaxing afternoon of shooting.
 
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Started in 1967 with 38 Special Classic Lee Loader .
When Lee came out with its tiny Hand Press I retied the Classic "Whack-A-Mole" and the reason was noise and reloading inside the house ... all that banging usually disturbed something or someone ..baby , kids, wife ... the hand press was totally portable and oh so quite inside the house.
I do use the hand press and a little Ram Prime unit on the press , for most of my handloading now .
Over the past 54 years I have picked up 7 bench mounted reloading tools and they are used for heavy duty stuff but the Hand Press is doing all the handgun ammo inside the heated and cooled house...getting old and soft !
I think every new reloader should start with a Classic Lee Loader to learn the basic's and be able to eyeball each step as it's performed .
Gary
 

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Are you talking about the Lee hand loader one shell at a time or the Lee C loading press? I started with the one and still use the other.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
the Classic "Whack-A-Mole" and the reason was noise and reloading inside the house ... all that banging usually disturbed something or someone ..baby , kids, wife
Know what you mean. I usually cheat when using those. I use my bench vise to press the cartridges into the die. Only have to whack to extract. (That is not as loud) Usually like to weigh my powder charges on a scale too. Still if you really think about it, they are amazing tools......................................
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Are you talking about the Lee hand loader one shell at a time or the Lee C loading press? I started with the one and still use the other.
I was thinking of the single loaders. The C press is something new that I've never heard of. I will have to look around to see what these are.
 

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The "original" Lee Loader was everything you needed in a very small box.
I never did use a hammer or mallet with mine as I had an arbor press to use instead. I told my friends and brother to use a bottle capping press to prevent the occasional primer fire as they seated the primer with a hammer.
I was used to buying quality tools so after looking at the alternatives I bought an RCBS Rock Chucker when the time came. My brother liked the idea of the "progressive" press and bought a Lee turret press. He had problems with 6mm TCU cases not chambering so we got together and I watched while he sized some cases. The rotor that just dropped in and turned into position was rocking when he sized his brass. I put a dial indicator on the press and measured the rocking at the working station and opposite that station. There was .082 lift at the die station and .039 lift at the rear of the rotor. That left a misalignment of .043" when sizing. We set his die up for my press and the problem disappeared. He ended up retiring his Lee press and bought a cast iron "O" type press to do his reloading. I don't remember the brand only that it wasn't a Lee press. No more problems.
Presses used in the heavy equipment and automotive repair industries are "O" type presses. The fully supported frame keeps tooling and parts in alignment. RCBS is not the most expensive press on the market and they do have less expensive choices but I have been satisfied with the precision of my Rock Chucker for the last 48?? years. I have loaded and all of my ammo on it and for three years I was loading 10000 rounds a year just for competition with my 357. Add to that two rifles and another pistol that I fired to build skill and had fun plinking with and you can get an idea of how many rounds I have run through the press. I never felt the need for a faster way to load.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
The "original" Lee Loader was everything you needed in a very small box.
I never did use a hammer or mallet with mine as I had an arbor press to use instead. I told my friends and brother to use a bottle capping press to prevent the occasional primer fire as they seated the primer with a hammer.
I was used to buying quality tools so after looking at the alternatives I bought an RCBS Rock Chucker when the time came. My brother liked the idea of the "progressive" press and bought a Lee turret press. He had problems with 6mm TCU cases not chambering so we got together and I watched while he sized some cases. The rotor that just dropped in and turned into position was rocking when he sized his brass. I put a dial indicator on the press and measured the rocking at the working station and opposite that station. There was .082 lift at the die station and .039 lift at the rear of the rotor. That left a misalignment of .043" when sizing. We set his die up for my press and the problem disappeared. He ended up retiring his Lee press and bought a cast iron "O" type press to do his reloading. I don't remember the brand only that it wasn't a Lee press. No more problems.
Presses used in the heavy equipment and automotive repair industries are "O" type presses. The fully supported frame keeps tooling and parts in alignment. RCBS is not the most expensive press on the market and they do have less expensive choices but I have been satisfied with the precision of my Rock Chucker for the last 48?? years. I have loaded and all of my ammo on it and for three years I was loading 10000 rounds a year just for competition with my 357. Add to that two rifles and another pistol that I fired to build skill and had fun plinking with and you can get an idea of how many rounds I have run through the press. I never felt the need for a faster way to load.
I have often noticed this "rocking" when using my turret press, but I don't really think that it is throwing off my loads as I only use it in single stage, but I have often wondered if this could cause some problems. I now also have an old time orange crusher and use it for many things.
 
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