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If your rounds are chambering easily then I would agree that it may not be a concern. On top of the chambering problem my brother had accuracy concerns too. The "Orange Crusher" is a darn good press! I would go so far as to say it was on a par with the RC. ;) My brother never had problems with his 44M or 357 rounds in the turret press but he doesn't have it any more. We are both accuracy driven whether it is a pistol or a rifle. (shotguns still frustrate me) ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #42
If your rounds are chambering easily then I would agree that it may not be a concern. On top of the chambering problem my brother had accuracy concerns too. The "Orange Crusher" is a darn good press! I would go so far as to say it was on a par with the RC. ;) My brother never had problems with his 44M or 357 rounds in the turret press but he doesn't have it any more. We are both accuracy driven whether it is a pistol or a rifle. (shotguns still frustrate me) ;)
Yes. I load mostly straight walled pistol cases n some basic rifles. I usually get great accuracy but have had the occasional one that would not shoot for anything. I've got a .22 hornet that does good but nothing near what I know it is capable of. Going to get that one up and going again soon.........
 

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I started with a Lee Loader, Lyman 45th Reloading book, Lee dippers and some Blue Dot for a Ruger 41 Mag. Loaded my first round at my hunting camp during a snowstorm next to a woodstove. Pulled the trigger and Boom thinking "I made a bullet"! Still a memory that makes me smile and I became a Lee fan for life. Have Lee Loaders for every caliber I use except the 416 Mag and use a single stage Lee for almost all my stuff. Have a Lee Turrent but rarely use it as I like to do it one at a time.
 

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I started with the lee loaders in .357 mag and 12 ga. Both produced usable ammunition...slowly, and produced the odd blood blister too. Every now and then the .357 primer installer tool would explode a primer if my swing became too enthusiastic. Startling, but not dangerous. The shotgun tools didn't do that and made good ammunition with paper hulls, but plastic hulls were too much for them to crimp very well. A month later I moved on to a Rockchucker and a MEC 650 each of them has made tens of thousands of rounds. After 20 years of disuse I sold the lee hand tools on eebay for 6 times what I paid for them. In the 15 years hence I haven't missed them one bit. I don't use the 650 enough anymore to keep it around, but the Rockchucker still see's lots of hard use. I do think it will last many lifetimes!
 

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Started in 1967 with 38 Special Classic Lee Loader .
When Lee came out with its tiny Hand Press I retied the Classic "Whack-A-Mole" and the reason was noise and reloading inside the house ... all that banging usually disturbed something or someone ..baby , kids, wife ... the hand press was totally portable and oh so quite inside the house.
I do use the hand press and a little Ram Prime unit on the press , for most of my handloading now .
Over the past 54 years I have picked up 7 bench mounted reloading tools and they are used for heavy duty stuff but the Hand Press is doing all the handgun ammo inside the heated and cooled house...getting old and soft !
I think every new reloader should start with a Classic Lee Loader to learn the basic's and be able to eyeball each step as it's performed .
Gary
Very much like my own story....start with a Lee Loader, move to a handpress and then bench mounted presses....and more bench mounted presses. (15 now and counting).
 
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I started loading in the mid 70s. I took my Army reenlistment bonus and after paying off some bills I had just enough left over for a .44 Mag. I found, after buying one box, that I could not afford to shoot it so I bought a Lee hand loader in .44 Mag, a Lyman D5 scale (still use it today), a box of primers, some Sierra 240 grainers, and some Herc 2400. At that time I also found that I could load a box of shells for about half what a factory box cost even buying the brass. I was hooked and saved up for a Rock Chucker, which I still have along with my 30 year old Dillon RL550.

I believe I still have the "Lee Loader" out in the shop somewhere, I'm going to have to look for it.
 

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Started reloading in 1971 with a Lee Loader in .38 Special with Bullseye and Unique. Progressed to an RCBS Jr. press and dies a few years later. Still have both and continue to use the press. Currently reload .380, .38 Special, .357 mag, 9mm, .40, 44 mag., .45 ACP, .45 Colt, .30-30, .223, .270, .220 Swift. Great fun!
 

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Back in the day when I was a poor skeeter-wing private that needed to keep a Stevens 12ga SxS fed, I bought a Lee Handloader for shotshells and would sit in front of the TV and load a couple boxes for whacking northern Kalifornia jack rabbits where I was stationed. My load was simply 1 1/4 shot in a Federal 12S4 wad, a scoop of Unique, whatever hulls I was able to pick up, and whatever shotshell primers were available. I now know better than to mix and match shotshell components, but I never noticed any issues doing so back then. I wish I still had it. Several guys in my platoon also used a Lee Handloader to load metallic cartridges.
These days I'm using a Lee Load-All II to load shotshells until I retire and move to my up north house where I'll set up a MEC Sizemaster. I plan on giving the current LEE away to a friend at that point, but I'm buying another LEE Load-All II to feed a 20ga. At $50ish, they do load good quality shotshells.
 

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I did while in high school.
Bought a Mosin Nagant, a box of Norma ammo, Lee 'whack a mole' reloader from Gander Mountain and supplies locally and shot and reloaded it.
Took awhile to get comfortable pounding that primer in the cases.
Gay
 

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Neck stretching? Is this an issue with the Lees in rifle cases? I've never heard of that. Don't think that I have any other than straight walled pistol cases.
Yes, they started stretching after three four times reloaded. It's common even in a conventional reloading setup. Rifle cases generally deal with higher pressures and they can 'grow' and necks can thicken. I believe back then I used 4064 rifle powder under 130gr Sierra boattails and 90gr Sierra HP's (a very explosive, upon impact, bullet.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
Yes, they started stretching after three four times reloaded.
Thanks. I don't load a lot of rifle cartridges, and the ones that I do are not all that high pressure, so I have not seen a lot of neck stretching. I generally trim my cases a little shorter than recommended and check them in a homemade length gauge fairly often.
 

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Started around 1979 with a Lee Loader in 303 Savage. Even back then, ammo for the old 1899A wasn't commonly available. It was OK for cobbling a box of once fired brass into reloads, but I bought an RCBS Jr press kit within a year or two. That old RCBS is still going like new forty years later.
 

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I started with one in 222 Remington, Still have loader, and several others, don't have the 222 anymore. Learned the basics and a lot of the principles from that little outfit.
 

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I bought the bench rest Lee for my .243 and have been using it for almost 50 years, picked one up for my 7MM Mag on e-bay a few years ago, and I think they must have turned into a collectable.
 

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I've got one in .30-06 but, I didn't start out with it. I saw one in a gun shop several years ago and thought I would give it a try.
 
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