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Piney Woods Moderator
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Looking for any input on the Lee Pro 1000 Progressive press for 38sp/357mag. Looking for a low cost progressive press if it works ok or do I need to invest more money. I know someone here on the forum has some feedback, good or bad.
Thanks
John
 

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I have one and love it. After using it for handgun loads i wouldn't want to load them any other way (ss or turret) the press doesn't get very good feedback but as long as it's kept oiled and the primer trough isn't allowed to run too low there are no problems with it at all. I would rather have the loadmaster for it's ability to mount the fc die but the pro works well and i intend to keep using it untill i can afford a loadmaster or dillon 550b but the main thing i like about the two Lees are their ability to change calibers at very minimal cost.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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I have two, one for 40S&W and one for 45ACP. both work well, but have their quirks. Nothing that can't be overcome. I reloaded 400 45ACP's in about an hour the other day.

RJ
 

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Looking for any input on the Lee Pro 1000 Progressive press for 38sp/357mag. Looking for a low cost progressive press if it works ok or do I need to invest more money. I know someone here on the forum has some feedback, good or bad.
Thanks
John
I've had two. I consolidated my press collection into one Dillon 550B because I wasn't shooting as much pistol anymore and I wanted a semi-progressive (no auto indexing) suitable for both rifle and pistol- not because there was anything wrong with the Lee Pro-1000's.

Because of Pro1000's low price I think they appeal too much to beginners when they're really best for someone who already has experience with the whole loading process. For the person who's already loaded and knows what's supposed to be happening at each stage- there is no better reloading value in a fully progressive press, IMO.

The Pro1000 can have quirks but they're easily mastered by anyone who can "tinker". After you've figured out what, if any, little setup issues a particular pro-1000 might have the only thing to keep a watch on is the primer trough. With small primers it doesn't take much to cause them to stick in the trough. I just tap the primer tray, attached to the trough and that settles them down the trough. This problem isn't as bad with the heavier Large primers.

Also, many of the adjustments you make to get a Pro-1000 to run right might not hold. After you've loaded several rounds, maybe hundreds, something with the case feeder, for example, might get out of whack- this is what drives some people batty. In my experience, the pro-1000 is like an old British sports car- they take a little fiddling to keep them running right.
 

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Had two of em, one setup for 9mm and the second for 45 acp, once setup and the little tricks learned your ammo is reloaded ready for he next days competition.

On getting home the brass goes into the tumbler while you have some dinner and before 9pm you have a few hundred of at least one calibre, I found them easy to use once your charge weight is correct you don't need to change it unless your using a new batch of powder, and the dies don’t need to be moved unless a new bullet is used.

With the price of factory ammo the lee Pro 1000 paid for itself in a month or less, then all your up for is the "P" consumables, powder, primers, projectiles, petrol.

Others like 357/ 44 and 38 that were not used as much were done on an individual turret press for each, at least different setup turret tops, depends on the quantity you shoot, and in my case where I had different guns for different competition, IPSC and general service / stock matches so the two lee presses I had plus also a MEC Sizemaster for the rem 1100 12g got a lot of use without failure on any press.

Sure there is an occasional load hiccup like running out of primers or cases, powder on the other hand needs to be kept at the same height in the hopper all the time and the press used exactly the same way with each stroke so powder charges are kept close to the same, and primers are seated correctly on each up stroke, but I would still weigh every 50th round just to be sure something has not come loose.
 

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I have two and have to agree with most of the above comments. They work great once you get them set up and learn a few tricks. In addition to not letting the primer tray get low keep a can of compressed air handy to keep the dirt blown out of the priming mechanism. You can get the cans at OfficeMax or Staples.
I am a fan fo most things "Lee" except for their written directions. They usually leave something to be desired. However their websight does have some good videos for some of their equipment.
Mike B.
 

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I have two, one for 40S&W and one for 45ACP. both work well, but have their quirks. Nothing that can't be overcome. I reloaded 400 45ACP's in about an hour the other day.

RJ
I could never get the .40 S&W cases to feed from the case feeder....never! I even bought the special "Z" bar recomended by LEE just for the .40 & still no luck. Tried smoothing/polishing the feed ramp from case feeder to shell holder too. Now I just hand feed on case at a time and it works fine. My Pro-1000 is looking at 20+ or more years of light useage. It is the one with the case sensor to allow a primer to pop up in place only when a case is present. When I use it for 38/.357 or .45 ACP it works fine & feeds cases.

Keep the primer chute full of primers and you minimize chances of primer to feed failure....not totally eliminate tho.

Any suggestions???? on how to get the .40 S&W cases to feed??????
 

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Any suggestions???? on how to get the .40 S&W cases to feed??????
The 40 s&w requires the large case feeder, bent z bar, and small case slider. Are you using the small slider? .38/357 and .45 acp use the large slider so i am thinking you are trying to use the same slider for 40 S&W?
 

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Something I ran across a few days ago:
http://forums.loadmastervideos.com/forums/index.php
These folks seem to have all the problems worked out, or worked around.
They seem to think pretty highly of these presses, but there are
tricks to making them work properly and trouble free.
 

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I have had one foe 15yrs. It works ok as long as you pay attention to it. Don't be visting with some one. Make sure it stays in time.: Dwayne
 

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The 40 s&w requires the large case feeder, bent z bar, and small case slider. Are you using the small slider? .38/357 and .45 acp use the large slider so i am thinking you are trying to use the same slider for 40 S&W?
can't remember now....it's been long time since I tried to use the feeder system. Will check and try what you have set down here for me. I emailed LEE factory back then too, but don't remember them telling me what you just did.

Thanks for the tip.
 

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I have had one foe 15yrs. It works ok as long as you pay attention to it. Don't be visting with some one. Make sure it stays in time.: Dwayne
That's it in a nutshell - FOCUS, Grasshopper, and the Pro-1000 is excellent. Using mine since they came out, what, umpteen years ago? 9mm, .38, .357, .40, .41, .44, .45lc and .45ACP. Also [rarely] .50AE.
 

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The pro 1000 is a good little press. Like any of the progressives it needs to be kept clean and lubed and FIRMLY mounted. If you watch a couple U-tube videos and see the presses flexing while the video'es are showing you how fast and easy their presses work, you can almost bet these folks are new to reloading..I also believe this is where the Pro 1000 and Loadmaster get a lot of their bad reviews. They are really not for a beginner. A newB gets one because they want to make a LOT of rounds in the shortest amount of time spent, and really don't have the experience they need to setup and operate these presses succesfully. They want to pull it out of the box, screw it into a card table, hook up the case feeder, bullet feeder, fill er' up with primers and start yankin on the handle. When things start to go sideways they really don't know where to start looking..I read so many replys on these presses that say you need to "be mechanically inclined or know how to tinker" BS, you need to know how the press works, what the stages do and why, and be able to follow directions. Keep it clean, lubed, and don't try to wear it out in the first 15 minutes trying to see how many rounds you can produce..okay...okay...my rants over, thanks for listening..
 

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The pro 1000 is a good little press. Like any of the progressives it needs to be kept clean and lubed and FIRMLY mounted. If you watch a couple U-tube videos and see the presses flexing while the video'es are showing you how fast and easy their presses work, you can almost bet these folks are new to reloading..I also believe this is where the Pro 1000 and Loadmaster get a lot of their bad reviews. They are really not for a beginner. A newB gets one because they want to make a LOT of rounds in the shortest amount of time spent, and really don't have the experience they need to setup and operate these presses succesfully. They want to pull it out of the box, screw it into a card table, hook up the case feeder, bullet feeder, fill er' up with primers and start yankin on the handle. When things start to go sideways they really don't know where to start looking..I read so many replys on these presses that say you need to "be mechanically inclined or know how to tinker" BS, you need to know how the press works, what the stages do and why, and be able to follow directions. Keep it clean, lubed, and don't try to wear it out in the first 15 minutes trying to see how many rounds you can produce..okay...okay...my rants over, thanks for listening..
Yep the pro is a slick little press! I bought a load-master and after taking it apart to better understand it, i realized that you can break the press down into parts and put it all back together including adjustments in less than 30 minutes. There is not one single problem that can't be fixed on this press in three minutes or less. After reading so many bad reviews on a press so simple to adjust, operate, and maintain, it makes me wonder what type of person leaves such bad reviews... Perhaps employees of other manufacturers? I am really enjoying the LM! the ram is tight with no play and there is absolutely no play or movement in the turret, yet it does allow a small amount of adjustment before locking it in.
 

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I never was able to get mine to work and finally sent it back for credit and got one of the Classic turret presses with automatic indexer. That set up easily and does a great job. It loads as many rounds as I can afford to load.
 

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The statement that "it's not for a beginner" is too true, and that stands for all progressive presses no matter the brand, or model.

Most any new reloader should not buy one until a single or turret press has all the reloading quirks down to instant memory recall, to make a mistake which could be fatal might more than put a downer on an ordinary trip to the range.

I recently saw a S&W 686 which had exploded three rounds in the cylinder at the same time due to maximum loads and very high primers, the end result is a virtual hand grenade with the cylinder blown in half and the top strap broken, done by a new reloader who made every mistake possible at the same time on a progressive press, making three exploding hand guns I have witnessed.

I had a look at the X1650 fully automated press on U-tube, such a press in the hands on all but the most experienced would almost surely result in some injury or worse at both home in the press where primers and powder make great components for some kind of explosion or fire, or at the range.

I doubt that any reloader who uses a progressive press often would say anything different, they are not for beginners and reloading in a single stage press can be just as dangerous if the operator did not bother to ask or better still be shown what to do, most all gun clubs have many experienced reloaders who would always be prepared to offer a couple hours to teach a newcomer how to set-up and use the new reloading gear.

It's a shame to see perfectly good guns blown in pieces because of a simple error that could so simply had been avoided, another long barrel German Luger comes to mind which blew apart because when asked what he did, the new reloader had simply filled the 9mm case up with W231, could see the bullet would not fit so he emptied out enough powder until it did fit into the compressed load, would be about 8 - 9g for those who load the 9mm.

Great machines but any new reloader really needs to be good on a simple press first, in any situation when organised an awful lot of ammo can still be made from a single stage press, more than enough to keep plenty of ammo handy.
 
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