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Discussion Starter #1
I have read on forums that the Lee fcd die actually caused a loss in accuracy for some folks using cast bullets in revolvers so i thought nothing of it when i went to the pro 1000 and shelved the fcd since there is no station for it. On the 4th i shot several hundred 45 colt rounds in the back yard and found that groups were much tighter (as much as 2") on the rounds using the fcd. How do i correct this without using the fcd? Could i take a loaded round and run it through the fcd and then pull the bullet and measure it and size to that diameter?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
No opinions or advise on this one? The lfcd sizes the entire cartridge including the bullet in the case. I am not smart enough to figure out if the sizing of the bullets in the case is what improved the accuracy or if its a combination of other variables.
 

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The Lee FCD only sizes the cartridge if the cartridge is over size to begin with. The size ring in the die is at SAAMI max dimension to insure chambering in all firearms, so if your bullets are correctly sized to begin with it shouldn't even touch it. I use it for all my 45LC loads and it doesn't touch anything except for the case mouth when it crimps. Hope this helps.
 

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Scott,

I think that accuracy difference is likely mostly due to getting a stronger crimp. The FCD carbide ring actually does a couple more things for accuracy that bear mentioning, though. If your bullet is started crooked into the case, so the base is bulging the case on one side only, the ring, if that bulge is enough to make contact, will tend to straighten the bullet out. The other is that if you put a really sharp roll crimp into a case, the bend in the brass at the mouth can actually cause the sides of the case to spring out just below the crimp, thus causing loss of some portion of the grip the case neck has on the bullet. The FCD ring straightens that back out if it occurs, so the FCD will let you make a stronger crimp than a standard seater/crimper die will. (BTW, for other readers, a Redding profile crimp die will also prevent that effect and tend to straighten bullets by hugging the brass below the mouth as you crimp.)

In your case, with a three station press (I can just see a Dillon 650 or a Hornady LNL in your future; 5 stations) you first need to see if you can just get more crimp out of your seater/crimper die? If simply turning it in an extra 16th of a turn works out, your problem is solved. If that doesn't cut it, consider buying one of the Lee Hand Tools and using it just as a factory crimp station. Running the rounds through the one die in that press doesn't take long. You can do it while watching TV. It gives you something to use the shell holder than came with your dies for.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I sat around thinking about this and realized that it may have to do with something else entirely different than the die. I was thinking that the powder was the same as was the primers and bullets when it struck me that i cast some of those bullets over a year ago and some only a couple months ago...perhaps i mixed up my alloys. I don't have a hardness tester but all the older bullets have been expended so it would be easy enough to load some of the newer bullets and use the FCD on a batch and see what happens.
 
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