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Discussion Starter #1
I’ve been practicing with a clay target trap. Most shots take place within 30 yards using my side by side 12 gauge shotgun that has two fixed .182 chokes, which I presume that are equivalent to a light modified choke according to Belgian nomenclature. Please correct me if I am wrong.

I was lent a 12 ga. over & under with cylinder and improved cylinder chokes respectively and though clay pigeons were not hit as consistently as with the side by side, my ratio of misses was reduced almost to none. I first thought that the reason was that the over & under shotgun gave me a better line of sight, until I changed the over&under chokes for improved modified, and realized that it was basically a choke issue.

Since I will be hunting with my side by side I have to keep shooting with light modified chokes. Any information on the most effective range and lead when using this type of chokes will highly be appreciated.

PS: I use 2 3/4 shells, 24 to 28 grams / #7
 

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I think you might have constrictions somewhere between Improved Cylinder and Light Modified. As your shotgun seems to be of European manufacture the bore will probably be smaller and the choke closer to the Light Mod. Measuring the bore, and exit diameters will be beneficial, as they will give you exact numbers.

Effective Range and Lead can be difficult, just too many factors. Some of this info from Hallowell may be of use to you.

A couple of other factors that may contribute, are the drop-at-comb and pitch. If you still have access to the O/U, taking some measurements and comparing to your SxS. Measuring the bore, and exit diameters will also be beneficial.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the information.

I double-checked the barrels and found out that the actual engraved measures are 18.4 / choke 18.2. According to Hallowell 's choke chart, both barrels are modified or 1/2 in England.

Furthermore, the drop-at-comb of the side by side is 1.5 inches; the same goes for the O/U. However the side by side's drop at heel is 2.8 inches while the O/U is only 2. Thus, the latter should be shooting higher.

With regards to the pitch, though I'm not certain whether my measurements were that accurate, I did not find any pitch at all in the side by side's stock, while the over / under has a 1/4 inch pitch.

However, I find bringing my side by side to the cheek much faster than the O/U, but with less margin of error when shooting, maybe due to the chokes' constriction.
 

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For a fairly open choke, and #7 shot with small game birds, it seems to me that you should have an effective range of about 30 yards or so. Is that the kind of information you were looking for?

Whichever gun you can bring up the fastest is probably going to be the most effective in the field.
 

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Choke

Thanks for the information.

I double-checked the barrels and found out that the actual engraved measures are 18.4 / choke 18.2. According to Hallowell 's choke chart, both barrels are modified or 1/2 in England.

Furthermore, the drop-at-comb of the side by side is 1.5 inches; the same goes for the O/U. However the side by side's drop at heel is 2.8 inches while the O/U is only 2. Thus, the latter should be shooting higher.

With regards to the pitch, though I'm not certain whether my measurements were that accurate, I did not find any pitch at all in the side by side's stock, while the over / under has a 1/4 inch pitch.

However, I find bringing my side by side to the cheek much faster than the O/U, but with less margin of error when shooting, maybe due to the chokes' constriction.
Those are the measurements for the gun. How do they compare to your own needs? Have you been fitted so that you know what measurements on a gun fit you.

I use a LM choke on my Trap gun - a BT99 - for ATA 16 yard Trap. The clays break regularly at 35 yards and beyond.
Pete
 

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Just remember breaking clay birds and killing live birds is two different things. you are not as concerned with penetration to break a clay bird but need penetration to kill live birds cleanly. For that you need somewhat larger shot depending on bird species and you need it to pattern well in your gun at the ranges you commonly shoot birds.
my 2 cents!:)
 

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Try patterning both guns, and see where they shoot in relation to each other, and also compare pattern size, both factors can make a lot of difference in weather you have hits or misses.

Windage wise both my Winchester Mod 12 and my Rem 870 are spot on, but elevation wise, the 870 shoots 6" lower, while the pattern size is the same size. There is also a much more uniform pattern in the Model 12, while the 870 is slightly more dense to the left side of the pattern board. Both are Skeet choked but the Winchester weighs more and is smoother swinging and easier getting on target and staying there.


Lee
 
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