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I have read where some people are casting bullets with straight linotype ?? Does this stuff make good hunting bullets ?? Is it close to Lyman #2 alloy ? What's the purpose of using it. Thanks..
 

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It's a good bit harder (BHN 28, typically) and it is a bit less dense than #2, so the bullets come out of the mold a bit lighter. You'll see a lot of them listed in Lyman's Reloading Handbook. They make good target bullets as you can drive a harder bullet at greater pressure before it starts to deform. But for hunting they can be too brittle, and can shatter on bone, especially in cold weather.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's a good bit harder (BHN 28, typically) and it is a bit less dense than #2, so the bullets come out of the mold a bit lighter. You'll see a lot of them listed in Lyman's Reloading Handbook. They make good target bullets as you can drive a harder bullet at greater pressure before it starts to deform. But for hunting they can be too brittle, and can shatter on bone, especially in cold weather.
Appreciate your reply. I thought that they would be to hard for hunting. Just curious. I've never tried tried it. I'll stay with my bhn of 10/12 for hunting. Thanks again..
 

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I used a 50/50 mix of lino and wheel weights (old style) when I shot cast bullet BR. They were about 18-20 BHN and looked and shot great. Still too hard for hunting, if you are looking for much degree of expansion, though large caliber rifle or handgun don't really need to expand to be effective. I agree, straight lino is not necessarily a good hunting bullet choice.
 

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Linotype is getting scarce! I remember picking out the big pieces from a wheel barrow at the news paper office. It's best used as a hardening alloy than straight, but straight linotype can be run hard without leading.
 

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As a kid on a Cushman Eagle, I had four sources of linotype that would give me a double handful for the asking and gunshows were full of it. The printing business has changed tremendously. Alloys can be made or bought, of course, but handy linotype is rare.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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free vs what price?

--"Linotype is getting scarce!"
--"Free linotype is getting scarce!"


One of those statements makes a claim about the availability of an alloy. The other makes a claim about the likelihood of someone giving you something for free.😉



Cheers
 

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#12 BHN is about as hard as I would cast. I actually prefer 8-10 BHN.
 
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...............................................
 
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After having a thought provoking discussion with a friend this morning about Silver coins? I have come to the conclusion that a 1964 Kennedy half dollar is more prevalent than the 1963. Copper pennies some the same? Linotype and wheel weights, cheap or free is gonna end up like plumbers lead in California, folks remember it, but nobody in the business, uses it for plumbing. The Daze/Days of free/cheap and plentiful are gone. Not saying linotype is irrelevant, just saying it's going the way of the dinosaur? Folks will see the footprints, but not the critter.
 

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I'm kinda surprised that bullets cast from pure linotype would even stay together, once they hit something. The antimony content is twice the upper limit used as acceptable to AVOID embrittlement. I would THINK that adding linotype 1:1 with pure lead would make a pretty acceptable "general purpose" casting alloy, though adding a bit of tin to assure mold fill-out might be prudent.
 

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1:1 lead to linotype is going to be in the 15-16 BNH range which would yield a good hunting bullet at reasonable velocities depending on bullet design.

If one compares Lyman's 429421 to other moulds ( Lee, Saeco etc) you'll notice the lube groove is very deep and wide and was designed for 50/50 beeswax and alox. Too hard of a lube (Rooster Zambini, Carnauba Blue etc) can be worse than no lube at all with that style of bullet in certain circumstances.

As the OP hasn't stated what caliber, bullet or lube he is using we can only speculate.

@175sierra if you could give us more info please?

RJ
 
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It all depends on conditions. Veral Smith reported that after he moved to Idaho, he discovered that the old conventional wheel weight metal he had relied on for cast bullets for decades would actually shatter on bone in Idaho's super cold winter (sometimes -40°).
 

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My Mentor on Bullet casting WAY back told me that 1/2 Linotype and 1/2 WW was the perfect combo. When he told me about my Dad having to give him Lead Chelation when he was a teenager...I started buying my Cast Bullets.
 
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I've fired some hardcast thru my SBH and had them lead near the forcing cone. Very hard to clean! That was under 1000 fps. They fit the chambers well. Softer bullets obturate better and I can drive them faster. Just my 2
 

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I have seen overly hard cast bullets crack forcing cones on revolvers. One was an old model Ruger Super Blackhawk. This was after many hundreds of rounds, full bore 22 grs of 2400 loads. I prefer them soft enough to expand at least a little. I do have about 70# of linotype left, used judiciously as a hardner.
 

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I have read where some people are casting bullets with straight linotype ?? Does this stuff make good hunting bullets ?? Is it close to Lyman #2 alloy ? What's the purpose of using it. Thanks..
You can get a close approximation of Lyman #2 with a 50/50 mix of pure lead and linotype, adding just a pinch of tin will help the alloying process.
 
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