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Discussion Starter #1
I want to load for a .367 SD out of a snubbie. I am specifically looking at the Barnes TAC 110 bullet. Barnes publishes data for both .38 and .357 for this bullet. But none are the same powders. And one shows velocity from a 2" barrel and the other from a 10 " barrel. The velocities for the .38 are too slow to ensure expansion and the velocities for the .357 seem inappropriate for a snubbie using slow powders. I was wondering whether I should work up loads from the .38 list using the .357 case. Maybe the .38 case would do. But I don't think I can work down from the .357 data since they are all slow powders. I'm wanting to achieve about 1100 fps.

Any suggestions?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I want to load for a .367 SD out of a snubbie. I am specifically looking at the Barnes TAC 110 bullet. Barnes publishes data for both .38 and .357 for this bullet. But none are the same powders. And one shows velocity from a 2" barrel and the other from a 10 " barrel. The velocities for the .38 are too slow to ensure expansion and the velocities for the .357 seem inappropriate for a snubbie using slow powders. I was wondering whether I should work up loads from the .38 list using the .357 case. Maybe the .38 case would do. But I don't think I can work down from the .357 data since they are all slow powders. I'm wanting to achieve about 1100 fps.

Any suggestions?
I just saw a load for a 110 gr jacketed bullet for Titegroup powder. Where Barnes leaves off at 4.3 gr. to achieve 883 fps, this other load starts at 7.2 for 1612 fps in an 18" barrel. Kind of an odd selection of powder for a rife, but it appears there is room to work a load from 884 fps to 1100 fps in the .357 case. So now, am I missing something?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I just saw a load for a 110 gr jacketed bullet for Titegroup powder. Where Barnes leaves off at 4.3 gr. to achieve 883 fps, this other load starts at 7.2 for 1612 fps in an 18" barrel. Kind of an odd selection of powder for a rife, but it appears there is room to work a load from 884 fps to 1100 fps in the .357 case. So now, am I missing something?
So, a 10 " barrel produces 1509 fps with 7.2 gr. of Titegroup. 8 more inches of barrel and 100 fps improvement. I wonder whether, with the speed of Titegroup, that the bullet didn't start slowing down in the barrel after the powder was consumed.
 

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What do you hope to do with this load, exactly? I mean, what will you be wanting the bullet to hit? And then what should it do, after it hits the target?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
also,
What do you hope to do with this load, exactly? I mean, what will you be wanting the bullet to hit? And then what should it do, after it hits the target?
I plan to load it in a .357 LCR. If necessary, I want it to hit the maniac who is attacking me. It should penetrate more than 12” and expand to more than 150% and, hopefully, thereby stop the attack.
In the .357 caliber, I have only owned .357 magnums, even when shooting .38s. I have often carried .357s into the field for finishing shots on game. But, for the application, in a light revolver, the full power loads are unnecessary and slow down following shots. So, I want as mild a load and recoil as is feasible. The 115 gr. TAC (for 9mm) appears to expand and penetrate well at 1050 fps per Lucky Gunner so I assume a 110 TAC will expand and penetrate well at 1100 fps. To achieve that result, however, I need to find a powder type and charge that will produce the fps I want and the published loads won’t give me that information.
There are alternatives, such as the HST micro 130 gr. in .38, but I am wanting to try the TAC.. That’s why I asked whether I was on the right track.
 

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I've used published 38+p load data for this exact purpose. I found that the 125gr 130gr bullets did better in the .357 snub.
I had good luck with a 125 xtp over 7.0gr of W231 col 1.590
 

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I've used published 38+p load data for this exact purpose. I found that the 125gr 130gr bullets did better in the .357 snub.
I had good luck with a 125 xtp over 7.0gr of W231 col 1.590
Yup, just stick with 38+P (or just normal 38s).
I do that for my SW Air Lite 357, the 357 loads work fine, but are a little sticky when i empty the cylinder out, dropped down to 38 +P and no sticking issues and the follow up shots were faster.
 
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I am specifically looking at the Barnes TAC 110 bullet… I was wondering whether I should work up loads from the .38 list using the .357 case. Maybe the .38 case would do.
I don't know the cylinder length of your LCR357. The crimp groove in the 110-grain TAC-XP is located for the 38 Special case length, which means that seated in a 357 case crimped into that groove (which you will need in a light revolver), COL could be as much as 1.685". If your cylinder isn't that long and the bullet ogive isn't short, you will be working with 38 Special cases with that particular bullet to keep the bullet noses from sticking out of the cylinder. That means working up from the 38 Special data, as you first considered, might be the case. I suggest using cases labeled +P+ if you can find some. This is to avoid any question of the pressures being normal for either 38 Special or 38 Special +P. Alternately, you could trim some 357 Mag cases down to have a pressure-appropriate headstamp for your final product.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I don't know the cylinder length of your LCR357. The crimp groove in the 110-grain TAC-XP is located for the 38 Special case length, which means that seated in a 357 case crimped into that groove (which you will need in a light revolver), COL could be as much as 1.685". If your cylinder isn't that long and the bullet ogive isn't short, you will be working with 38 Special cases with that particular bullet to keep the bullet noses from sticking out of the cylinder. That means working up from the 38 Special data, as you first considered, might be the case. I suggest using cases labeled +P+ if you can find some. This is to avoid any question of the pressures being normal for either 38 Special or 38 Special +P. Alternately, you could trim some 357 Mag cases down to have a pressure-appropriate headstamp for your final product.
BARNES PUBLISHES A COAL for the .357 TAC 110 gr at 1.630. But, yeah, that could be a problem. Back to the drawing board.
 
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