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It seems that my Ruger 45 Colt is a slow one. I need more powder than others to achieve the same velocity with the hotter loads. I am considering seating the bullets out long (in this case the Cast Performance 335) and using a Lee Factory Crimp Die to bite into the bullet between the normal crimp groove and the upper grease groove. This would allow me to have the cartridge overall length at 1.745" instead of 1.665", thus effectivley increasing the case capacity by about 11% which would enable me to get the same velocity but at lower pressure than I am now. Any comments? If 24.0 grains of H110 is giving me 1280 fps now would I need 24.0*1.11=26.6 grains to get the same velocity with the bullet seated out further? Thanks, Brian C.
 

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I WOULD NOT BE LOADING 24+ H110/W296 IN THAT STOCK RUGER WITH A 335.  YOU WILL BE APPROACHING 40,000 WITH THE LOADS YOU MENTIONED. JUST FOR COMPARISON 29GR WITH A 340GR LBT IN THE 454 CASE IS 52,000 CUP. AND 26 GR IS NOT THAT FAR BEHIND. WHATS WRONG WITH A 335 AT 1200-1225? WHATS TO GAIN BY AN EXTRA 50 FPS? FLATTER SHOOTIN? NO!! KILLING POWER? NO!! WEAR AND TEAR ON YOUR GUN? YES!! YOUR BC GAP IS .007" NOW, SHOOT A COUPLE HUNDRED OF THE LOADS YOU MENTIONED AND SEE WHAT IT IS. PLEASE IF YOU WANT MORE POWER BUY SOMETHING BIGGER AND THAT IS BUILT TO TAKE IT. THE STOCK RUGERS ARE BRUTE STRONG FOR WHAT THEY ARE DESIGNED TO HANDLE BUT NOTHIN ABOVE THAT. THE BIGGEST CULPRIT YOU HAVE, IS SEND THE GUN TO A SMITH AND HAVE THEM SET THE BARREL BACK FOR A GAP OF .003" OR SMALLER. YOU ARE GETTIN THE PRESSURE BUT THE LARGE GAP IS PREVENTING THE H110 FROM GETTIN A COMPLETE BURN DOWN THE BARREL. THIS POWDER LIKES TIGHT TOLERANCES TO GET COMPLETE COMBUSTION.  ANYWAY DONT WORRY ABOUT AN XTRA 50-75 FPS OF VELOCITY. MANY A CYLINDERS ARE IN THE SCRAP YARD FOR THE REASON OF CHASING VELOCITY. PLEASE BE CAREFULL!!!
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Brian, I put a similar bullet (same weight different MFG) through a hog LENGTHWISE at a velocity that was almost certainly below 1200fps (only 21 or 21.5 gr. powder).

My .357 Blackhawk will give horrible ES numbers with a 185gr WFNGC and WW296.... and shoot 2" groups at 50 yards.

Sometimes the hardest thing to admit as a handloader is SUCCESS!

You're done... nothing more to accomplish here.  The greater OAL will just tie up your gun some day when a bullet jumps crimp.
 

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Beartooth Regular
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I will wholeheartedly concur with Jim and Mike. Their cautions should be taken with a great deal of seriousness. Brian there is little to gain and potentially much to lose in your endeavour.
 

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Mike G !(and the rest also) I sure wish you would put that hog data on the Questionaire and send it for the database we are working on....Best regards, James
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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James, I would have, but it was 2+ years ago and I cannot be absolutely certain about measurements, etc.  Personally, I prefer to be very precise when reporting results to others (like group sizes, velocities, etc).

So.... here's what I remember.  If it is useful to you, go ahead and add to your database.  Bullet was a .45 cal WFNGC, from Ballistic Advantage (not sure if they are still in business, they used to frequent the gun shows in the Austin TX area), advertised weight of 325 gr. and actual weight of 335 gr. with lube, gas check, etc.

From my load data I'd estimate the velocity at just under 1200 fps, but I never chrono'd the load.

Range was, oh, 15 yards or so.  I had run down a wounded (gut-shot) hog on foot.  Hog was in the range of 100 lbs. or so.

As you can imagine, with trying to catch my breath and shoot a running pig, and especially with the 'presentation', shot placement was not entirely ideal.  Bullet went into the right hip, missed the hip and leg bones, went through the entire body cavity, and exited at the front of the left shoulder.  Not sure how exactly to measure the permanent wound cavity but I had to cut out a chunk of meat (about mid-way between the size of a baseball and the size of a softball) from the ham.

No other muscle tissue had been disrupted until the bullet poked out the chest, leaving a .45 cal hole through the ribs.  Other than a little trimming on the ham, virtually no meat was lost.  Amazingly enough, even with the hog being gut-shot with a rifle (stomach), and shot this way with a pistol, the large intestine was not ruptured.  As I recall, it ate just fine!

Oh and at the shot, the hog (which was running) spun around in it's tracks as it hit the ground.  I did put one more round through the head but it was just wiggling a bit, not going anywhere.

Well... hope you find this as entertaining as my hunting partner did.  I can still hear him laughing!
 

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Excellent post, Mike G!......You and I know in real life hunting situations there are few, if any classic "Guns & Ammo", perfect shots! When things get Hot and Sweaty, we have to take what shot we are offered. The situation we write about is true to life...I've been there also. As for the database...we can only enter data that is the best gut feeling and observation the hunter/shooter can come up with! Maybe I made the data entry questionaire too cut and dried? I didn't mean to. From your post I can add important data. I only hope other hunter/shooters will follow the example you have set. Thank You and Best regards, James C.
 
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