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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Ruger single action Bisley 45 Colt. I noticed that there was a bit of a gap between the metal of the grip frame and reciever. I did some investigating and removed the wood grip panels. I saw that the two allen head screws that attach the grip frame to the reciever were quite loose. Naturally I removed and cleaned the screws and then reinstalled them with a dab of loc-tite. I am wondering though if the loose screws could have been some of the problem I have been having with large groups. I will shoot it again soon (hopefully this evening) and should find out but was just wondering if that would likely have much impact on group size. Thanks, Brian C.
 

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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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Brian,

I recently had a gunsmith address a "chipping lead" problem with my Blackhawk. He found the problem wasn't the timing or alignment, but that several key screws were loose and once they were tightened, as you would expect, things lined up better and I had an accuracy improvement -- not to mention less blood on my left cheek. Sooooooooo, one would assume loose screws, either on a revolver or the shooter, can affect the accuracy :)

Dan

(Edited by DOK at 4:21 pm on Sep. 11, 2001)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
DOK, how would loose screws cause lead to be shaved off of your bullets? I too sometimes get stung in the left cheek by something. I tightened all screws and shot it again. Groups were no better overall. I shot some average groups and some big groups and some small groups. I think it is mainly still me and inconsistent technique. I did shoot a 4.3" and a 3.5" group at 75 yards with open sights from the bench and a rest. Those are like I would do with my 2x scope so I am seeing some improvement, but am also still getting some wild shots occasionally. Anyway I am interested to know more about this lead shaving. I do not remember if I got stung last night after having tightened all screws. Thanks, Brian.
 

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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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Brian,

I asked several of the recognized expert gunsmiths the same question. They mutually agreed "misalignment" can cause lead to be shaved.  First they said, "All magnums may chip lead", but then followed up by saying that misalignment causing the bullet to enter the forcing cone off-center was one of the typical causes. And loose screws apparently don't hold the cylinder/barrel alignment as true as if they are tighten properly.  But they also reverted back the their original statement that "all magnums have a tendency" and that correcting timing and barrel/cylinder gap helped, but may not completely cure the problem.

Anyway, in my case, tightening the screws and testing on two different range dates, did eliminate my lead chipping. The accuracy improvement didn't cut my groupings in half, but five 5-shot groups did average better -- may have been my shooting improved when I didn't have to duck pieces of the bullets?

Dan

(Edited by DOK at 8:16 pm on Sep. 11, 2001)
 

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I would have to think that a loose grip frame would have alot of effect over accuracy.  The gun wouldnt be moving in the same direction after the initial ignition of the primer.

As the bullet is moving down the barrel. The barrel itself is moving rearward and upward in response to the pressure building in the chambers and barrel.

Not to say that your hand and arm will allow the gun to recoil the same way every time.  But you do have a chance on the recoil moving in a similar direction as opposed to however the grip was aligned at the time the trigger was operated.

How much will the accuracy change is a big question that I could never even try to explain.  Give it a try and please let us know what you come up with.
 
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