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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Note, I have deleted the article as you did not indicate whether you have permission to copy it here. You can substitute a link, or recopy it if you can show you have the author's permission.
 

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Note, I have deleted the article as you did not indicate whether you have permission to copy it here. You can substitute a link, or recopy it if you can show you have the author's permission.
Done, and done in original post.
Thanks!
 

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It would have been a whole lot better had the author included the most sensible cartridge: the .280 Rem. And no, I don't own one.

As objective as I can be, the .308 Win might be the second most sensible cartridge for all North American big game hunting.
 

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The most sensible cartridge to own is the one that works best for you, there is no such thing as most sensible for everyone & ole Chuckie doesn't necessarily know how and where I hunt.
 

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I don't agree with Hawks and I stopped reading after he called the 6mm Rem something special.

The 6mm Rem and 257R mentioned after it are flops that never became popular yet linger on.
 

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It would have been a whole lot better had the author included the most sensible cartridge: the .280 Rem. And no, I don't own one.

As objective as I can be, the .308 Win might be the second most sensible cartridge for all North American big game hunting.
Sans,

+1 on the .308!

Just for discussion purposes - in the game fields, inside 400 yards +/-, what will the .280 do that the .270 Win won't? I'll concede that the 7mm can launch a heavier bullet when need be, but in that dept, the 160 gr Nosler Partition in .277 is no slouch. And, the Winchester's 130 gr has long earned its deserving reputation as a consistently reliable killer on a wide variety of species, large and small.

None of this takes anything away from the .280 Remington mind you, not one bit. My favorite just differs from yours. :)

Cheers
 

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I would disagree with nearly every cartridge he picked because there all a little to long to work really well in a short action with the exception of 300 savage and 358 Winchester. I would pick 243, 260, 7-08 and 308 and end it there. 308 is a better designed and much stronger case than 300 savage, same could be said when comparing the 7-08 and 7x57.
I had a custom 358 built years ago and shot a good bit of game with it, regardless of what I used it for it always seemed a little lacking as compared to the 308 and 7-08.
The 7-08 and the 260 in that order are my favorites.
 

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Love This Article

This is a good article, Laidback. Chuck obviously enjoys cartridges that are efficient and don't push the limit. These are quite adequate for most game hunted, with the exception that, in many areas, game is not found within 200 yards and most of us like the added power of an inefficient cartridge. That being said, I like his inclusion of the 6mm Remington as I continue to prove to myself it's superiority to my son's .243 Win (although I kinda wish I had a 6mm Rem AI!). The .338 Federal is one heck of a cartridge for big game, providing the range isn't extended. And W. D. M. Bell killed over 1000 elephants, mostly with the 7mm Mauser, a very mild and efficient cartridge. So the article brings us back to what is appropriately called "sensible" cartridges.

Then again, I enjoy my Yukon Denali rather than a VW van or 6 cylinder pick-up. I won't give up my insensible cartridges like my 280 AI, my 300 WBY and my 340 WBY. And it seems those of us raised well after the Great Depression are not as conservative as those who went through it!:)
 

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I don't agree with Hawks and I stopped reading after he called the 6mm Rem something special.

The 6mm Rem and 257R mentioned after it are flops that never became popular yet linger on.
Are you a younger member, by any chance?

The 257 Roberts was quite successful for many years. It would have been even more successful if it had been loaded to its full +P potential, in strong actions, from the time it was introduced. Frankly, since critters haven't gotten any tougher, the 257 Bob is as good as it ever was...and that means it's still a VERY good deer cartridge.

Just because it predates your interest in guns doesn't mean it wasn't successful. Also, some day you will be the old thing that seems to just "linger on"...that won't make you any less effective or valuable, either. ;)
 

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I think Chuck was right on with the 6mm but don't consider it light years better than the .243.

Other than that I agree with Kevin's accessment. Thank God we don't all have the same tastes or needs in firearms otherwise I'd have to throw my 25-06 and win mags in the lake.
 

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I think Chuck was right on with the 6mm but don't consider it light years better than the .243.

Other than that I agree with Kevin's accessment. Thank God we don't all have the same tastes or needs in firearms otherwise I'd have to throw my 25-06 and win mags in the lake.
Headline 12/26/2014 Shooters Forum
A member that goes by MontyF said he "agrees with Kevin"


I'm getting worried, people are starting to agree with me on here.
My brother has a 700 in 6mm, I don't believe there's ever been a better road hunting coyote round made, especially when it's windy.
 

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Everything Chuck said must be true. I read it on the Internet.

And to keep from re-writing history - the result of the U.S.Military experimenting with the 300 Savage case was , the 7.62mm NATO. The 308 Winchester was the commercial version of the 7.62mm.
 

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It's hard to agree with Hawkes on everything - thank God I don;t have to.

But....... I enjoy reading all of his writings. He never swears he's absolutely right and as a plus, his site is absent much of the advertisements that clutter up so many others. I like a fast bullet and a fast loading internet page.

(My favorite rifle is a Savage 99 in 300 Savage so, as you can guess, I started to like that article a little more when I hit that part of it) ((:)D)))
 

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Are you a younger member, by any chance?

The 257 Roberts was quite successful for many years. It would have been even more successful if it had been loaded to its full +P potential, in strong actions, from the time it was introduced. Frankly, since critters haven't gotten any tougher, the 257 Bob is as good as it ever was...and that means it's still a VERY good deer cartridge.

Just because it predates your interest in guns doesn't mean it wasn't successful. Also, some day you will be the old thing that seems to just "linger on"...that won't make you any less effective or valuable, either. ;)
I am too young to have been there when the old 257 R. was introduced. I did buy a new M70 in 1957 that I still have and a friend used a 257 in a 722 back in the 60's.

You have a point that if a "new" cartridge is introduced and perks up gun sales for a while that can be considered a success.

Heck the car companies have some 'new' feature every year!
 

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Sans,

+1 on the .308!

Just for discussion purposes - in the game fields, inside 400 yards +/-, what will the .280 do that the .270 Win won't? I'll concede that the 7mm can launch a heavier bullet when need be, but in that dept, the 160 gr Nosler Partition in .277 is no slouch. And, the Winchester's 130 gr has long earned its deserving reputation as a consistently reliable killer on a wide variety of species, large and small.

None of this takes anything away from the .280 Remington mind you, not one bit. My favorite just differs from yours. :)

Cheers
Happy New Year, Mr. Lee,

I agree with you 100%. Remove 175 grain bullets from the equation, and there is no difference between the .270 Win & .280 Rem.

Due to sectional densities, the 150 grain .270 Win bullet would be equal to the .280 Rem 160 grain bullet.

I don't own a .280 Rem. I do own 2 270 Win's. I have found the .270 Win to be a very efficient and sudden big game killer. I could hunt all that I want to hunt in North America with a .270 Win, and that includes elk & moose.
 

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Happy New Year, Mr. Lee,

I agree with you 100%. Remove 175 grain bullets from the equation, and there is no difference between the .270 Win & .280 Rem.

Due to sectional densities, the 150 grain .270 Win bullet would be equal to the .280 Rem 160 grain bullet.

I don't own a .280 Rem. I do own 2 270 Win's. I have found the .270 Win to be a very efficient and sudden big game killer. I could hunt all that I want to hunt in North America with a .270 Win, and that includes elk & moose.
Amen. And Happy New Year to you Sans.
 
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I am too young to have been there when the old 257 R. was introduced. I did buy a new M70 in 1957 that I still have and a friend used a 257 in a 722 back in the 60's.

You have a point that if a "new" cartridge is introduced and perks up gun sales for a while that can be considered a success.

Heck the car companies have some 'new' feature every year!
OK, so you're no young'n...why is it you think the 257 Roberts was a flop? Granted, it has fallen out of favor, but in the years you mention, it was quite popular and effective. For decades, a "257" was a Roberts, and every gun nut knew it. :)
 

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The 57mm cartridges have not been the most popular here as they are too long for short actions and too short to fill a long action.

The 25 caliber is in the middle of too big ricochet and noise wise for varmints and too small for big game.

That's why!
 

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The most sensible cartridge to own is the one that works best for you...
Indeed! In my late teens to mid-twenties, my only centerfire rifle was a .30-30 Marlin 336 with a Weaver K2.5 scope. After a few seasons I felt the need for just a bit more reach and performance for deer hunting. I started handloading the (now discontinued) 135 grain Sierra spitzer just short enough to work through the Marlin action. Using published data designed tor the TC Contender, I worked up this Single Shot Pistol bullet to just over 2450 fps from the 20 inch barrel. Now, I only used the Marlin as a two shot repeater with that load - one in the chamber and one in the magazine. Sighted-in 3" high at 100 yards it was then on at 200 yards

This was a most sensible - if non-standard - .30-30 load through many game filled years.
 
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