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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently had a custom 308 built on an old M-98 large ring action. How common is it for an old battle rifle like this one to have the firing pin not strike the primers hard enough to set it off? It just does not seem to make a very deep hit mark on the primers. Could I remove the pin and grind down the shoulder just 3-4 thousands and allow the pin to move farther forward, or is a new pin the fix? I have no idea what the exact brand/make of the action was, I know it was WW-1. Too much of it was removed in the rebuilding of the action to the new custom rifle. Thanks for any help! Jon:eek:
 

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I would measure the pin protrusion BEFORE you do anything else. The problem may just be a lot of crud inside the bolt, slowing down the pin??
 

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Cleaning any crud from the inside of the bolt makes a lot of sense.
I might replace the firing pin spring before I did anything to the firing pin - who knows how old that spring is?
 

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It depends

I agree that cleaning the inside of the bolt body may be helpful. Sounds like the mainspring may need to be replaced or the firing pin. These parts are available from places like Gun Parts Corporation or Sarco, Inc. Both places have websites. Hope this helps. All the best...
Gil
 

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There can be MANY things that cause a light firing pin strike. There is NOTHING on a M-98 that you can file to make it better.

Has the bolt handle been altered? If so, that is likely to be the problem. You say a WW-I action and a large ring?

The bottom line is this: Mauser firing pins don't wear. If it's short, somebody made a mistake.

Disassemble the bolt, measure the firing pin protrusion and work backwards. There were seven different firing pins made for the M-98 before WW-II. Are you sure you have the right one?
 

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Another vote for a good cleaning. Firing pin protrusion can be checked. Don't grind anything until knowing where you are starting from.
 

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Make sure the firing pin assembly is locked tightly in place where it screws into the bolt body. Sometimes folks don't make that final rotation to seat the assembly against the body. Will look OK, but won't allow firing pin to reach the primer properly.
 
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One more thing. The firing pin never even touches the inside of the bolt. You can clean, flush, scrub and pick at everything in it and it makes NO difference in firing pin strike. The firing pin stops inside the bolt shroud by way of the cocking piece hitting that inner surface.

I think kdub is right-- You have to depress the bolt lock to get it past the root of the bolt handle on the last turn and without the last turn the FP can't hit the primer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
compairing.. VZ-24 to my custom build

Thanks Guys for all the help, I pulled out my Dad in law's VZ-24 98 Mauser to compare it to my custom build... so I had some better idea what you guys are talking about! First, my bolt handle was turned and re-welded, the large flange directly behind the bolt has been ground away, and the flip over safety has been removed.. (it has a new adjustable trigger with safety) I watched a video on disassembly of the bolt, which looks easy, flipping the safety over then un-screwing the end of the bolt off. Since I have no safety to move, it looks like I need to depress the pin on the side of the bolt, and pull the end of the bolt back with Vise-grips then turn it to unscrew it? By the way, I assume the bolt unscrews right hand thread? Thanks for all the help.. where can I go to get measurements for proper fining pin length? JM
 

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You DO NOT need vice grips for guns!! Whoa, Bubba!!

Just hook the cocking piece on the edge of something stout but inexpensive and pull the firing pin out far enough to slip a coin between the cocking piece and the shroud. The rest is the same.

Firing pin protrusion is .058 to .062 OR the diameter of the pin.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well, I got it out-- but with no safety, the vise grip was the only way to hold the rear of the firing pin assembly while I un-screw the end off... now... the front piece of the washer that holds the pin spring is really nasty-- it was milled off on 2 sides (factory) but the edges are all burred and worn down with sharp edges. I will clean these edges up and also clean out the bolt and see what I get. As one who commented said, firing pins don't wear-- now that I have it apart I believe this is true, the pin looks pristine... so my problem lies somewhere else.. Thanks Again! Jon
 

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Jon Moore --- You are about to negate (screw up) a Mauser safety feature. That is the firing pin block you're about to mess with. WHOA!!

What is the firing pin protrusion as it is now?
 

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I recently picked up a 1903a3 for $50 because someone had turned the bolt handle down and not properly filed it to allow the bolt to close properly rendering the gun unable to fire. They couldn't figure out why. That's my bet on yours. They didn't file it quite far enough after welding on the new handle or turning it down, so the cocking piece hits the end of the camming surface on the bolt that cocks the gun when you try and fire it.

Check the firing pin protrusion with the bolt completely assembled by de cocking the bolt outside of the gun, then remove the extractor and see how close to level the raised section that is normally under the extractor is when the bolt is in the gun. On the 1903A3 it was really easy to identify the problem because the third lug was way out of alignment and easy to see.

For the love of firearms DO NOT USE A VICE GRIP! Catch the bottom of the firing pin (the part that engages the sear) on the edge of a desk and pull the bolt up with the bolt face facing up then twist to let it down on the bolt shroud!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the last 2 reply's! As I said, the gunsmith removed the flip over Mauser safety so no issue there. I got the bolt apart, as I said the firing pin was nasty with grind marks and burrs, and a rounded off edge. I took it out to the shop and stoned the burrs off and cleaned the grind marks off the front of the washer that holds the spring. Then with a wire and soaked in gas, I cleaned out the bolt, digging out some very old stuck gunk. I cleaned and air gunned it out best I could, assembled the bolt and pressed the bolt end of the pin (while de-cocked) down on my bench to see how much of the firing pin extended past the bolt face. I got probably 3/32" of fining pin to extend past the bolt face. I assembled the bolt to gun and loaded one of the rounds that did not fire on my last range outing.. it fired! I will run more ammo through and hope I fixed the problem of the slight ding in the primer and the round not firing. Thanks everyone for your help! Jon Moore

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