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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well, I got the 454 Alaskan. Still have yet to compare it with my .44 .4.2" Redhawk. Shot a few cylinders of Hornady 300 gr XTP Mag bullets through it, along with some Hornady cowboy 45 colts.

The cowboy loads felt great. Even more of a pleasure to shoot than my .44 Alaskan that I traded in a while back.

The 454's were absolute murder.

Not that I was surprised by that. I was wondering what y'all think about Magna Ports? The folks at Magna Port install two ports on each side of the 454 Alaskan. They said they've done tons of these jobs.

Anyone fire an Alaskan with ports installed? I understand that ports on a 454 would be much more noticeable than on a .44. I never even thought of installing ports on my .44 Alaskan. It handled heavy buffalo bore rounds, no problema. But a 454 seems worth considering the idea of having Magna Port install the usual package (2 ports on each side of the barrel). I've seen the way they look and Magna Port seems to machine them to look the most professional, pretty much as if they were factory-issued.

I bought the 454 Alaskan because I know the shorter muzzle on the Alaskan really cuts down the power a great deal. (I have a 44 Super Redhawk in 7.5" barrel and would not want a 454. The .44 is plenty of power for me with a barrel that long.) Having that extra umph in a 2.5" barrel is not a bad idea in Griz country. Plus the shorter barrel is a dream to carry on your hip, especially when getting in and out of a vehicle a few times. In a pinch situation with a griz or even a smaller bear, the 454 would be my choice. I do vacation in Alaska from time to time, so it's not a bad idea to have the extra power. There are also Grizzlies in some parts of Eastern Oregon near the Hells Canyon region of the state.

Any thoughts on porting a Ruger Alaskan 454?
 

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I wouldn't recommend porting it. Casulls already produce a lot of muzzle blast and noise, and in the Alaskan it is exagerated due to the short barrel. You will only compound this with the porting. If the recoil bothers you, I would recommend milder loads, and here lies the rub. All factory .454 ammo is loaded hot. You can either start handloading (which I highly recommend) or you can feed it .45 Colt ammo which is normally quite anemic to accomodate all of the old .45 Colts out there that cannot handle higher pressure loads. I think handloading is the answer. You don't have to run the .454 hot for it to work. The biggest advantage the Casull has over the .44 mag is diameter -- it makes a bigger hole period. Buffalo Bore, Double Tap ammo, and Grizzly all offer hot .45 Colt ammo that is quite a bit milder than their Casull ammo.
 

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As stated, reloading would be the best solution. For same $$$ you could get a reloading kit and use the .454 factory stuff from Buffalo Bore when you are on vacation in Alaska. Otherwise, you could use a reasonable .454 reload that suits you and your gun.
 

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I wouldn't recommend porting it. Casulls already produce a lot of muzzle blast and noise, and in the Alaskan it is exagerated due to the short barrel.
Just the thought makes my ears ring (even worse than they do all the time :(. At one point I was ready to buy one of the 5 shot Taurus .44's with a ported barrel, and a friend offered to let me put a couple through his. Two shots were enough, and they were't even very hot loads.

One advantage, a bear at close range would likely develope a concussion from the blast from a ported .454, and if you were still on your feet, you could walk away. :D
 

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Magnaporting is a waste of money IMHO & E I shot 2 FA 83's with 4 3/4" barrel one magna ported the other one not. I shot them side by side and I could not tell any difference in recoil between the 2
 

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Magnaporting is a waste of money IMHO & E I shot 2 FA 83's with 4 3/4" barrel one magna ported the other one not. I shot them side by side and I could not tell any difference in recoil between the 2
Yup, but I was more concerned with the noise increase -- something that a 2.5-inch barreled Casull can ill aford!
 

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It is so loud already that I doubt that one could tell the difference
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Sasquatch stopped by a 454

Yes, but could a 454 stop an attacking male sasquatch at 1,000+ lbs? I know that a 9mm could not even slow him down.

I know you probably think I'm joking, but I do backpack/fish/hunt in several alleged "hot spots" known for sasquatch activity.

I met some folks ten or so years ago who swear they have seen them, a tight knit group of about a dozen people with experiences that seem credible. Most of them are hunters and very down to earth. A few of them took me camping and I did hear some amazing things that did not fit into my extensive knowledge of forest animals and the sounds they make/things they do.

I know it sounds silly, but part of the reason I bought this gun was because I think sasquatches are probably real. Rare, and few and far between, but real. Totally nocturnal. The likelihood of you seeing one in the daytime is about the same as the likelihood of one of them seeing you out tramping around off trail in a dense and remote forest with no flashlight in the middle of the night with no gun. Why? Because man is the most dangerous animal on earth and sasquatches know that. They avoid us like the plague.
 

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Yes, but could a 454 stop an attacking male sasquatch at 1,000+ lbs? I know that a 9mm could not even slow him down.

You know that 9mm will not slow a Sasquatch down. I must ask how could you possible know this, since you admit that you do not know for sure if they even exist, therefor you can not possibly have any data on a 9mm even being used on one

Unless a Sasquatch is bullet proof a 454 will work.
 

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Well considering the fact that the 9mm is marginal on man-sized animals, I think it's safe to assume it would only piss off a 1,000-lb big foot.......:eek: LOL!
 

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Well considering the fact that the 9mm is marginal on man-sized animals, I think it's safe to assume it would only piss off a 1,000-lb big foot.......:eek: LOL!

NO way to know since no one has any real data on a Sasquatch. For all we know they may be easy to put down and of course we have no way to know how much they weigh or do not weigh or even for sure if they exist. IMHO more than likely they do not even exist
 

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I dont like the porting....really serves no purpose in a big way. The small amount of recoil reduction in a revolver is just not worth the effort. Look at it this way..."IF" you ever have to defend yourself from a bear, I will guarantee you that you will most likely not feel the revolver go off, or hear the sound of the shot, either.....just like hunting...really, how many times has the recoil of your 44 mag been a bother, when shooting game? Just practice with lighter loads...work up in increments till you get something that is fairly stout, and shoot that load a lot! Save the "hot" ones for a final sighting in and familiarization before you hit the woods. If your practice loads are somwhere close to the hot ones, the jump from one to the other wont be that bad. Before I settled on lighter loads for hunting in my 44 mags, I used to shoot Keiths old load of a 250 at 1250....then for hunting, I used my pumped up loads....I hardly noticed the difference.................We dont have Sasquatch here....we have Big Foot... the 4 Wheel Drive one!
 

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Kirk, if you reload, you can just work up between the .45 Colt and .454. If you don't reload, specialty companies like Buffalo Bore and Cor-Bon and Garrett (?) make fairly stout .45 Colt loads that would fit the bill.

I have a little experience with a .45 Colt loaded to around 30,000 CUP and let me tell you it is more than you might think. A 300gr. cast bullet at about 1,200ps with go through a bison, no problem.

The error people make in selecting a "stopping" load, my opinion, is to use too light of a bullet at too high of a velocity. Use a heavy bullet at moderate velocities and reasonable pressures. It'll do more than you think and be a lot more pleasant to shoot.

Best of luck.
 

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Kirk; Mike is right on....Grizz and I had been playing with a load in our 44 Mags....it was Grizz'z idea, and he turned me on to it, and we did some testing...a 405 grain beartooth at 1000 fps...or there-abouts. That load penetrates like nobodies business, and the recoil is like a 44 special...in a Redhawk. I would not be fearful to carry that load for bear defense. There might be hotter loads that would do better, but not by much.... and, this load is easy to control!!! A lot of folks swear by the 45 LC for bear defense....investigate those loads and you may be pleasantly surprised at what you find. Remember, to stop a bear, a central nervous system hit is what you are after, so "penetration", not energy is what you are looking for.
 

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Kirk,
You have some good advice here.

I might add my 2 cents.

First, choose a good bullet. It is what you will depend on to do the work. When it's your backside on the line, you need a bullet that is capable of reaching it's destination, even if it has to take the hard route. My preference is a good hardcast bullet with a modest meplat.

Second, you need to be able to apply it accruately and repeatedly until the fight ends. Excess power can translate into excess recoil and delays in re-aquiring your target. These are valuable moments you cannot afford to loose in a battle with jaws and claws bent on making you into hors d'oeuvres.

We tend to quantify power by numbers. It is easy to get caught up in velocity and energy figures. Although they are useful, they are better served in other applications than this. No amount of power will make up for shooting around the edges.

So, I agree, save your money on the porting, learn to reload if you don't already. Get a bullet and load combination that you can apply quickly, accurately and repeatedly for whatever gun you decide to carry. The 45 is a bigger hammer than the 44. The 475 bigger than the 45 etc. so you don't have to hit a 16P nail as fast or as many times with a 10lb sledge as you do a 8 oz tack hammer to get the job done.

hope this helps
todd
 

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I don't really have a dog in this hunt but thought I'd jump in anyway. First of all I am a big fan of Mag Na Porting. While I've never done it to a 2 1/2" barrel, I have done it to numerous barrels from 4" to 24". In all cases I have it is very effective at the very apparent reduction of recoil. Whatever you want to call it there is less recoil to deal with and repeat shots are a lot faster. So I am the guy on the other side of the balance beam who is a major fan of Magna Porting.

However, I must admit, it is not the direction I would take on the 454 Alaskan. Unless the goal is to set fire to the animal, a full bore 454 coming out of 2 1/2" just seems like a lot of wasted gun powder with epic recoil and blast. I am aware of what Grizz managed with his Redhawk and the 405gr .432 Beartooth bullet at just under 1000 fps bullet. Lot's of folks said it would not work but it's a penetration load far beyond foot lbs would suggest and it's accurate. I would suggest doing something similiar with your Alaskan. Maybe the 345gr Beartooth WFN bullet at 1000 fps would be a good place to start. Other guys have more experience here than I do. But I think the harder you drive a load, with or without porting, the less control you will have. Yet a heavy bullet at about 1000 fps will give you decent control and decent stopping power. I think Grizz ended up with 2400 as his powder of choice. just a suggestion but I would not be in a hurry to go to anything slower.
 

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Just a thought, the mag-na-porting should be more effective with a longer barrel (consider the leverage).

So, yeah.... probably not worth near as much in a shortie. And yeah, they are going to be LOUD no matter what. I don't care for ported guns and the only one I own is a 2" .357. Figure it's so darn loud that it won't make any difference, anyway.....
 

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You know that 9mm will not slow a Sasquatch down. I must ask how could you possible know this, since you admit that you do not know for sure if they even exist, therefor you can not possibly have any data on a 9mm even being used on one

Unless a Sasquatch is bullet proof a 454 will work.
JWP 475;
There is no evidence that ANY Sasquatch has ever survived a hit by a 9mm...........or a 257x50.......if they are shooting Silver Bullets. No wait, that is only if fired from a Titanium Redhawk. But NEVER from a Titanium Super Redhawk. That just wouldn't be right.
I got your PM Whitworth, many thanks.
 

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Just wondering, with all the muzzle pressure that a 2.5" 454 would release; IF the bear were on top of you, and you poked it in his ribs and gave him all six, could you inflate him enough with the gas injection to get him floating? You could then cork the entry hole and tie a string on him for a really scary balloon!

Make him easier to get back to camp.

Just thinking on the lighter side of things.......
Todd
 
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