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Discussion Starter #1
I came across several used Marlin 336 lever guns today and saw that they varied in price ranging from $300-$400, however, since I haven't looked at used Marlins i'm not sure if it's considered fair. I know pricing is dependent on many factors such as condition, model, etc., but is there a ballpark figure for a used Marlin 336?
 

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There are several things that affect the price of any used rifle, but I'd have to say condition is #1. Certainly the area of the country where you're searching affects it as well, but condition is always #1 in my book. The way I always try to figure a fair used value is to first find a really good new price on a like rifle and simply figure down from there. I think you'll find new 336s listed at some places for a bit over $400 and the less expensive version, the 336W, for well less than that. There seem to be tons of nice used ones listed from 350-$400. I'd think a 336 (walnut stock) for $300-$350 in excellent condition would be a decent deal.

http://www.gunsamerica.com/92106449...fles/Modern/Lever-Action/Marlin_336C_Rifl.htm

http://www.gunsamerica.com/91831133...ern/Lever-Action/MARLIN_336W_30_30_CAL_NE.htm
 

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I set out this fall looking for a M1894C. In the process I ran across several 336's in both .30-30, and .35 Remington. Most of the prices ran from a low of $150 for a tired older model, to about $350 for a newer model in very, very good shape. Put a scope on it and the price jumped about $100 for decent glass.

I ran across a pre-crossbolt model, with a couple dents in the wood, and a very minor scratch on the receiver. $215. I stripped the wood, raised the dents with a hot iron, dabbed a bit of Super Blue on the scratch, and had a nearly new rifle with an oil finish stock.

It depends. But right now, the racks are pretty loaded with post deer season guns, and the prices are low.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
are there any particular productions years that are considered more disireable than the newer models? I know I won't buy a new Marlin, so what years are considered good?
 

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are there any particular productions years that are considered more disireable than the newer models? I know I won't buy a new Marlin, so what years are considered good?
Carl, you can get a lot of opinions on this one.

I personally consider anything "pre-crossbolt" safety to be a winner.
 

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I agree, but considering the current state of Marlin lever guns even the CBS rifles aren't that bad.
 

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Last spring, I bought a 1977 year 336 in 30-30 off GunBroker for $295. Of course, I had to add $25 for shipping and a $20 FFL fee to transfer the rifle, so $350. This rifle was in good condition, but not excellent.

With shipping and FFL, expect to pay between 350 and 400. There are some good deals out there on GunBroker, but I'd say the average stated will be pretty close. I watch them all the time.

Scouring pawn shops and gun stores for used rifles can work. You'll pay a little more, but the benefits are that you'll handle and inspect the rifle, and save shipping and FFL. I'd say any pre-2007 model will be fine, though you'll have the crossbolt safety if you don;t mind that. I think the safety became standard sometime in the eighties, but don;t hold me to that. I would not hesitate buying a 1940's model and newer.
 

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I think the safety became standard sometime in the eighties, but don;t hold me to that. I would not hesitate buying a 1940's model and newer.
Stretch, that would be a good one for the Marlin forum.

The cross bolt safety is my own personal bias, not an indicator of much else.

I have a couple low mileage 336's from 80 & 81. A buddy of mine has a .444 from 1969, (the year we graduated from high school). The internals and finish on those is pretty much identical. What I'm not sure of is whether there was any difference in heat treatment or alloy formulation at some point. WWII saw a lot of improvements in alloys of steel, and heat treatment, and Marlin made all sorts of shooters for the war, and I'm sure they incorporated those wholesale from that point on.

Then there is the .375 Winchester, and subsequent 308/356's. Those baby's run a lot hotter than a .30-30 or .444. I have never held one of those in my hand, much less taken one apart. Where did the extra beef in the bolt/receiver/lock up come from? Was it across the board for all calibers? Are earlier post war rifles actually capable of those pressures?
 

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there is the .375 Winchester, and subsequent 308/356's. Those baby's run a lot hotter than a .30-30 or .444. I have never held one of those in my hand, much less taken one apart. Where did the extra beef in the bolt/receiver/lock up come from? Was it across the board for all calibers? Are earlier post war rifles actually capable of those pressures?
If I can get off my lazy but I will take a look at this, I have a 375 and a 444, to make the comparison to my Glenfield 30A that I just had bored out to 356 to see the differences, JES informed me to not run it hot (even factory loads for that matter) at that rate it's no better than my 35 Remington?
 

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If I can get off my lazy but I will take a look at this, I have a 375 and a 444, to make the comparison to my Glenfield 30A that I just had bored out to 356 to see the differences, JES informed me to not run it hot (even factory loads for that matter) at that rate it's no better than my 35 Remington?
Hmmmm, well, no better than a .35 Remmie isn't bad, it's just not better. Personally, I don't feel an ounce of pain with .30-30/.35 Rem performance, and if I need real "smack down" from a lever gun, I'll grab a .444 or .45-70. Even then, I'm not 101% convinced those rounds are that much better if you place shots well on deer/bear, or even elk/moose if you respect the range limitations. I hunted for many years on a drop camp property. The guide/owner had taken an elk every year for decades with a .30-30 passed down from his grandfather. Strangely, he felt "magnums" were silly. I never felt in a position to argue.

Mostly I'm curious about the safety factor. Both of my 336's seem to shoot best at the max, but I really don't love pushing them there. On the other hand, if i have 5K psi of safety slack, or more, I'm good.
 

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Generally you need to add about $50 to estimated used prices for the 35 Rem. Yes, there are exceptions, but usually the asking and selling price is higher than 30-30.

I re-read the OP post and realize he didn't specify what caliber
 
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