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I could not figure out all the action reaction but it sure did put some added info in my library. Is this real similar to the 1894 action. You know that's what I have on layaway.
 

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I have dissasembled my 1894.  All the parts look the same except the bolt.  I suspect the action on the 336 is longer.
As the lever comes down, it drops the locking bock near the back of the bolt. The slide moves rearward. A cam on the lifter is activated by the lever and lifts the new round up enough to be caught by the bolt on the forward stroke.  Once the alignment is right, and the bolt is forward enough, the lifter is dropped out of the way. In the final stages, the locking block is raised into the notch in the bolt, and last, the trigger block is released, as the lever is closed completely.
bang!
Humpty
 

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Jack,

And the point is??  Seriously, I note that this is a pre-cross-bolt action, was that deliberate?

I won't really get into the other thread on cross-bolt/rebounding hammer issue except to say Aesthetics, aesthetics, aesthetics.  If they don't bother the user then he is one of the lucky ones. Personally, I dislike them also for exactly the same reasons given by other posters.  And to the gentleman who uses his like a de-cocker, don't do it!  The geometry of the handguns built with de-cockers is entirely different than the Marlin or Winchester guns.  I havn't seen it yet, but it is only a matter of time until you break the hammer or the safety itself.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Hi, Alk:
  The picture pre-dates the cross-bolt safety. Pretty hard to show it before it was invented. :)

  I've got mixed feelings about the cross-bolt. On one hand, over half my Firearm Safety students drop the hammer the first time they try putting the old Marlin on safe. The gun's unloaded, of course. On the other hand, two of the best combat guns ever, the Lee-Enfield and the 1911A1, have a side safety and a half-cock, but you can't use both at once. If the crunch comes, one's enough.

 Anyhow, I should be explaining some of the finer points of the "action/reaction" instead of discussing the philosophy of lawyer safeties, but it's getting late.

Bye
Jack  
 

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There are several other pictures in that series showing the cross-section with the lever at various positions. I will scan them and post when I get time.
 

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I've never noticed this post before.
Thanks for posting. I like that picture. It does a great job of showing the cartridge feeding process, even without showing different stages of movement.
-In the picture, the next round in the magazine is held in position by the stop on the lever.
-You can see that after the lever moves back, that cartridge can pop back into position, landing on top of the carrier.
-By then, the carrier will be raised to the point that it prevents the next round from squirting out of the magazine yet.
-After the lever comes back more, it's carrier projection lifts the carrier to position the round for chambering.
-As the lever is closed and the carrier drops, it clears the next round in the mag tube, so it can come back until it stops against the lever projection.

It may not show all of this happening, but the pieces of the puzzle are all there to see.

Something else I took from this is how simple it all is. Looking at just the locking and feeding components, you only have the bolt, it's locking bolt, lever, and carrier.
Four main parts- if you count the bolt as one part.
Pretty simple.
 

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Why dont the attached pic show on my computer. What settings do not allow me to see them?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It could be any one of a dozen reasons. Browser settings, firewalls, ad blockers, etc. Can you see the small thumbnail picture? Which browser are you using?

Bye
Jack
 

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Most drawings of actions are soooo complicated that one can't see the trees for the woods. Yes, I know, I am an engineer (actually mathmatician who practices in engineering) and so should see all clearly. But I don't. That drawing is so clear and easy to follow; thank you! Are there simularly clear to follow drawings for the Winchesters and Henrys? After seeing a Henry .22, I am really curious how their Big Boy locks up.
 
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