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I recently purchaced a '75 Marlin Glenfield 30A, it has less then 500 rounds thru it and is in perfect condidtion but it takes about 10 pounds of force to get the lever open. Once its open 3/4 an inch it runs smooth as butter. Is this common? How do I fix it??


Thanks
Luke
 

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Its a pretty common issue. The Lever has a plunger which holds it closed; the lever plunger spring is either too strong or the plunger needs re-shaped. It shouldn't hurt anything but your hand to leave it the way it is, but its a pretty simple fix.
Andy
 

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In addition to a stiff lever lock, you may be experiencing a bit too much friction between the top of the hammer and the bottom of the bolt as the bolt pushes the hammer back and slides over it. Now, resistance at that point is normal -- after all, you're overcoming the tension of the mainspring -- but you can smooth it up a bit. Polish the bottom of the bolt and examine the hammer to see exactly where the bolt touches it, and polish that area, too. Go very easy in both places -- use a fine stone, or wrap some fine-grit abrasive paper around a piece of wood, and just polish the parts -- don't remove metal or change the shapes.
 

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Rather than buying new parts, I would remove your current plunger, clean it and it's recess, then lightly oil and test. If the plunger and recess are already clean (or cleaning them does not help), you can cut the plunger spring. Its a headache, because you have to re-assemble the lever to try it, but cut a little at a time (1/2 coil). I wouldn't bet on a new spring curing it. You can also polish the plunger where it rides to lock the lever closed. Last thing to try is re-shaping the plunger so it has less "hold", if you get carried away, your lever will pop open when the magazine is loaded (I have a 336 which does this).

I filed the point off a small nail for a punch to remove the plunger pin. Use a longer nail than I did, there was a lot of thumb-smashing when I fixed my 1895 plunger.

Andy
 
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