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just bought a yugo 24/47 8mm mauser fired some remington ammo thru it shot great . read were the u.s. ammo is weak can my mauser shot the hot stuff ? i think the date reads 1943 on my mauser
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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You can shoot any commercial 8mm Mauser ammo of recent manufacture in the Yugo rifle, providing you have a competent gunsmith check it over to verify its condition. The Turk stuff seems to be extremely warm, so might want to consider prior to using.

A very easy cartridge to reload for - might give that some consideration, also.
 

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European 8x57 ammo is loaded to standard pressure, while US-made ammo is loaded to lower pressure in deference to the older, smaller-diameter bore of the original 8mm Model 98. It should be fine in your 1943 Model 98. The only real exception might be in a European-made 98 sporter chambered in 8x57. For some reason, the smaller .321 bore remained popular in European sporters decades after the military had gone to .323. If you ever pick up a European commercial or custom sporter in 8x57, it would be wise to slug the bore before shooting it, just on the off chance you've got one of these smaller bores, especiallly if based on the 88, 93, or 95 actions, as some are.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Turk is definitely the hottest. Fortunately the 24/47 action is plenty strong. I shot one round of Turk in mine, not realizing the bore and chamber were both extremely pitted. The extractor broke trying to get the case out of the chamber. When I finally drove it out with a steel rod, it looked like a pickle from flowing out into all the pits.

The action held fine, though.
 

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Have owned and shot over 2500 different firearms including Blackpowder, Antiques, & Modern.
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Get some Romanian surplus 1970's ammo. It's a little bit dirty but good shooting.
Aim Surplus has it cheap. http://www.aimsurplus.com/
Note: This is corrosive primed ammo and must be cleaned accordingly.
Another type is 1950's Yugo surplus. It can have hard primers but I shoot it all the time in my 24/47. Sometimes you need to get a heaver firing pin spring for consistent ignition.
 

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I got about 1,600 rounds of 1940's 8x57 and shoot it in my old Turk Mauser. I thought that the smaller bore old 8x57 was .318 caliber and then when they went spitzer they went to the .323 calliber, what are missing here?
 

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1940's vintage ammo is .321/.323 dia. bullets. What model of Turk do you have? Anyway most likely when the conversion was done the bore is .321/.323. The 1888 German Commision rifle is the one with the .318 bore. Unless it is marked " S " bore.
From Surplusrifle forum:
"Many of the '88 rifles were converted to the "S" bore (.323 ) and used by the Turks and several other nations when used as secondary armaments. I myself and several of my clubs members have shot hundreds of surplus 8x57 rounds out of our rifles with no signs of stress or other problems. The rifles actually shoot quite well. There are many schools of thought on the safety of these rifles using surplus ammo. If your rifle was the original .318 bore, pressures could be very dangerous.
In the .323 bore, the Turks used some of the hottest ammo loaded for the 8mm. They issued these rifles to their troops with no known problems while being used in combat or for training."

Note: You really have to slug the bore to know for sure as some "S" marked rifles still have .318 bores. Some say the "S" is not bore size but that the throat has been reamed to take the "S" bullet.
 

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.318 is correct, I believe. The way my aging brain works these days, it's right amazing I can still remember how to spell Mawser -- Mouser -- oh, you know what I mean...
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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You gotta dig deep to find a .318" bore. The three commission mausers I had were all .323" as they had been converted in later years. You would pretty much have to stumble across an original, never used military rifle - or a sporter that has been set up as .318" from the get-go. Considering all the wars since the bullet specs changed to .323" it is extremely unlikely. Pretty common for mausers to be built, rebuilt, and rebuilt some more.

I'm not saying they don't exist, I'm saying they are very, very uncommon.
 

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You gotta dig deep to find a .318" bore. The three commission mausers I had were all .323" as they had been converted in later years. You would pretty much have to stumble across an original, never used military rifle - or a sporter that has been set up as .318" from the get-go. Considering all the wars since the bullet specs changed to .323" it is extremely unlikely. Pretty common for mausers to be built, rebuilt, and rebuilt some more.

I'm not saying they don't exist, I'm saying they are very, very uncommon.

I agree, when it comes to military rifles. But as mentioned before, for some reason unknown to me, the .318 bore remained very popular in European sporters for at least 2-3 decades after the switch was made in military rifles, and numerous manufacturers loaded (and still load) the .318 and .323 loads. While I would not turn down a good deal on an old, fine Mauser sporter, I would definitely slug the bore before firing it.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Wonder if the sporting rifle manufacturers kept the .318" bore to avoid issues with the Treaty of Versailles restrictions on 8x57 production?
 
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