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European 8x57 ammo is loaded to standard pressure, while US-made ammo is loaded to lower pressure in deference to the older, smaller-diameter bore of the original 8mm Model 98. It should be fine in your 1943 Model 98. The only real exception might be in a European-made 98 sporter chambered in 8x57. For some reason, the smaller .321 bore remained popular in European sporters decades after the military had gone to .323. If you ever pick up a European commercial or custom sporter in 8x57, it would be wise to slug the bore before shooting it, just on the off chance you've got one of these smaller bores, especiallly if based on the 88, 93, or 95 actions, as some are.
 

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You gotta dig deep to find a .318" bore. The three commission mausers I had were all .323" as they had been converted in later years. You would pretty much have to stumble across an original, never used military rifle - or a sporter that has been set up as .318" from the get-go. Considering all the wars since the bullet specs changed to .323" it is extremely unlikely. Pretty common for mausers to be built, rebuilt, and rebuilt some more.

I'm not saying they don't exist, I'm saying they are very, very uncommon.

I agree, when it comes to military rifles. But as mentioned before, for some reason unknown to me, the .318 bore remained very popular in European sporters for at least 2-3 decades after the switch was made in military rifles, and numerous manufacturers loaded (and still load) the .318 and .323 loads. While I would not turn down a good deal on an old, fine Mauser sporter, I would definitely slug the bore before firing it.
 
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