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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My question is can you melt lube in a small crock pot?? I hate the double boiler way. With a crock pot the kitchen wouldn't get some hot. Lol. Thanks
 

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All lubes (I assume we are talking about cast bullet lubes?) are not created equal, what lube do you want to melt, and to what end? Are you intending on recasting the melted lube or using (for what?) it in it's melted/liquid form?
P.S. Edit: If you are going to try a crock pot, beware of max temperature. I've read that too high a temp can cause viscosity changes in the lube and possibly 'burn' it and change other characteristics of the lube. You should shoot for melting temps around 200 to 215 degrees, around water boiling temps, that's why the double boiler is good. I'd check the dry crock pot with a laser temp gauge on low and high settings before proceeding.
 

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I've used an old microwave I have in the shop for melting lube. Mine is a mixture of bees wax and peanut oil.
It does take some time for the melt to start. It's used for pan lubing muzzle loaded bullets and nothing else.
 

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What is not clear is the intent. 175Sierra does not state whether he is wanting to melt a complete, ready made, purchased, final product, commercial lube (like in tubular stick form) and simply melt it to a liquid form, for whatever is his purpose. We are assuming he is pan lubing cast bullets, but for all we know, he may be pouring melted lube into his sizer/lubricator in an attempt to eliminate some other perceived problem. He may also be wanting to create his own lube 'recipe' wherein he is melting and combining a variety of components that may have varying melting point temperatures. As was the case in his post on wanting to trade for a Lyman 'luber sizer', he does not make much effort toward explaining his thoughts, wants, and needs, and we are all guessing with our responses and 'answers'.

P.S. Edit: A little more explanation of the point I'm trying to make is, that simple questions, looking for simply answers can end up with 'unintended consequences'. Googling the subject will reveal all sorts of examples and 'answers', with a few cautions sprinkled in there. Some of the recipe components can have relatively low flash points so, low temps and slow melts seem to be the general consensus to avoid the possibility of igniting a fire and/or damaging the final product. Some say they have had less than acceptable results with a microwave, others like it. I think I would tend toward a 'defrost mode' rather than 'high' on a 1000 watt Micro, but that's just my cautionary side. Same with a 'Crock Pot'...low setting!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
What is not clear is the intent. 175Sierra does not state whether he is wanting to melt a complete, ready made, purchased, final product, commercial lube (like in tubular stick form) and simply melt it to a liquid form, for whatever is his purpose. We are assuming he is pan lubing cast bullets, but for all we know, he may be pouring melted lube into his sizer/lubricator in an attempt to eliminate some other perceived problem. He may also be wanting to create his own lube 'recipe' wherein he is melting and combining a variety of components that may have varying melting point temperatures. As was the case in his post on wanting to trade for a Lyman 'luber sizer', he does not make much effort toward explaining his thoughts, wants, and needs, and we are all guessing with our responses and 'answers'.
For pan lubing home made lube.
 

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There ya go ;)

What, pray tell, are the lube ingredients? Don't have to reveal the 'secret recipe,' but knowing individual ingredients might prevent advice that will set your lube on fire ;)

I'd think a thrift-store crock pot, on the lowest setting, might make for an interesting experiment. But, not all 'slow cookers' are created equal. I'd start with it half full of water, with a thermometer in the water, and keep an eye on it for a while to get a better feel for how hot it may get. Less likely to burn water, but I know a few cooks who are capable :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
There ya go ;)

What, pray tell, are the lube ingredients? Don't have to reveal the 'secret recipe,' but knowing individual ingredients might prevent advice that will set your lube on fire ;)

I'd think a thrift-store crock pot, on the lowest setting, might make for an interesting experiment. But, not all 'slow cookers' are created equal. I'd start with it half full of water, with a thermometer in the water, and keep an eye on it for a while to get a better feel for how hot it may get. Less likely to burn water, but I know a few cooks who are capable :eek:
Now that makes a lot of sense. Damn good idea. My mix is bees wax and vaseline.seems to work great,so far.thinking about getting a luber sizer and using the same mix.appreciate the idea of the water and checking the temp..
 

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Mike, I don't think water will tell much, as it won't get past 212 F (notwithstanding altitude variances) in an open vessel. That is why I suggested using a laser type (red dot) thermometer, that are pretty cheap at Harbor Freight, aimed at the empty and dry interior bottom of the pot. Some people have said they have had good luck with small slow cooker pots, as they are easier to pick up by hand to pour the melt into the lubing pan, save the 4-6 quart models for the pot roast. Although, he does not say, but he may be making up large quantities of 'his recipe' to be stocked and used later as he lubes smaller quantities of bullets (?). Continue guessing...I guess!
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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See if you can find the 'flash point' of beeswax, and certainly you'd want to stay under that! :eek:

Other than setting the stuff on fire, don't see how you could go wrong with a slow cooker. Personal opinion. I wouldn't turn it on and then leave the house for a week to go on vacation, but somewhere, there's someone who might. Maybe putting a timer on it would be a good idea, for safety.
 
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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Heating up water will give a good idea of the time involved to make up a batch of lube. And yes, if the water starts boiling, then by all means stick with ingredients that don't ignite under 212 F...... The max heat of the element doesn't mean the entire mixture will reach that temperature, especially if the lid is off, but it wouldn't hurt to know how hot the sides of the vessel will get, either. Point taken.

So the water test has a little merit, I think, if for no other reason then getting an idea of how long it would take the batch to be 'done.' Also, instead of water, the ingredient with the highest flash point in the lube mixture could be substituted. Nothing like explaining to the rest of the family, and neighbors, why you're melting a gallon of vaseline.... :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO: :ROFLMAO:
 

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See if you can find the 'flash point' of beeswax, and certainly you'd want to stay under that! :eek:

Other than setting the stuff on fire, don't see how you could go wrong with a slow cooker. Personal opinion. I wouldn't turn it on and then leave the house for a week to go on vacation, but somewhere, there's someone who might. Maybe putting a timer on it would be a good idea, for safety.
Mike, If you click on the link I provided above, there is much info on many components. Beeswax has a flash point around 250 degrees, and It says that past 190 degrees Beeswax is 'damaged' and becomes brittle.
 

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I've got an old Gun Digest book, or similar, with Dean Grennell being one of the authors and recounting how at one time he could get a lube made of beeswax and lithium-based wheel bearing grease. Said it was the best lube he'd ever used, but the challenge was that the melting point of the grease, was remarkably close to the flash point of the beeswax :eek:

I've heard of some sort of wax called 'micro bead' or similar, that is in some of the better bullet lubes, but don't know of a supplier.
 

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I've got an old Gun Digest book, or similar, with Dean Grennell being one of the authors and recounting how at one time he could get a lube made of beeswax and lithium-based wheel bearing grease. Said it was the best lube he'd ever used, but the challenge was that the melting point of the grease, was remarkably close to the flash point of the beeswax :eek:

I've heard of some sort of wax called 'micro bead' or similar, that is in some of the better bullet lubes, but don't know of a supplier.
The link covers these too. The 'drip point' of Lithium grease is 350-400 degrees, supporting Grennell's 'concerns'.
Microcrystalline wax is explained. It is a good link reference for anyone desiring to 'mix their own' and it lists several 'secret recipes' from others, past and present.
 

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When trying to melt anything that gives off flammable vapors, it's important to keep the stuff away from open flames. The double boiler just means the heat is available in the boiling water without a spark close to it and water can't get so hot as to drive off the flammable vapors.
If we compare melting bullet lube with a butane torch or in a double boiler, I'll take the water process.
The goal is to NOT create flammable vapors. Boiling water wont.
 
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