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I brought my Smith&Wesson M&P15T with MBUS to the range on post yesterday, and was practicing with iron sights. It's been a while since I qualified on the M16, so I've been out of practice. I zeroed the sights at 100y, so I assumed that to hit the small-sized tombstone at 200y, I'd aim at the base (the thing's like 7"x5"). I was either shooting a hair to the right or to the left no matter what, and only landed 5 shots out of 15-20 on the thing.

The target was very small from 200y and the horizontal edge of my front sight post was twice as wide from my viewpoint. I tried to do what every sergeant has ever told me and focus on the front sight post and let the world go blurry, but then I'd completely lose the target.

Also, those 5 shots were consecutive, so I subconsciously recognized what I was doing wrong and fixed it.

I know the target was a little small, but I shouldn't have been 5/15--20!!!

Would any of y'all know what could have been going wrong (i shot on the exhale, and followed through with the trigger). Because I find my performance unacceptable.

(Also, my left eye is 20/200, uncorrectable, but that shouldn't be a problem shooting right handed, right?)
 

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I brought my Smith&Wesson M&P15T with MBUS to the range on post yesterday, and was practicing with iron sights. It's been a while since I qualified on the M16, so I've been out of practice. I zeroed the sights at 100y, so I assumed that to hit the small-sized tombstone at 200y, I'd aim at the base (the thing's like 7"x5"). I was either shooting a hair to the right or to the left no matter what, and only landed 5 shots out of 15-20 on the thing.

The target was very small from 200y and the horizontal edge of my front sight post was twice as wide from my viewpoint. I tried to do what every sergeant has ever told me and focus on the front sight post and let the world go blurry, but then I'd completely lose the target.

Also, those 5 shots were consecutive, so I subconsciously recognized what I was doing wrong and fixed it.

I know the target was a little small, but I shouldn't have been 5/15--20!!!

Would any of y'all know what could have been going wrong (i shot on the exhale, and followed through with the trigger). Because I find my performance unacceptable.

(Also, my left eye is 20/200, uncorrectable, but that shouldn't be a problem shooting right handed, right?)
Well sometimes what hits well at 100 is off at 200. I initially sighted one of mine it at 75 yards about a year ago and they were all printing great. Put the target out at 100 and guess what, same load was flying about two feet over the target stand.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you, but the height was perfect, it was the windage messing me up, and I don't know what I was messing up
 

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We really don't have enough information to make a determination. We don't even know what shooting position you were using.
It is hard enough to diagnose shooting mistakes while being next to the shooter, doing so online with no pictures, video, or pertinent information is practically impossible.

I know when I acquire my sight picture, I see all components of it, rear sight, front sight and target.
AK-47, 400 Yards, Cast Bullet - YouTube
I'd never do it any other way.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You're absolutely right, but if you told me how y'all would perform in that situation, it would help.
 

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For starters I hate those Magpul sights but that's another debate for a different day. I would much rather shoot the carry handle sights. Now for the problem at hand. Not knowing anything else other that what you have told us I would suggest to you to make sure you are shooting to your natural point of aim. Get behind the rifle, line up the sights, briefly close your eyes and reopen. If you find that you are not on the target anymore you are not in your natural alignment. What I mean that that is that you are imparting some torque to the rifle either left or right. Relax, make sure you have your body behind the rifle and everything is lined up properly, don't impart any right or left torque to the rifle and gently squeeze while you are in your natural respiratory pause and you should hit where your aiming.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you, I am new in the military, so I haven't had much experience. But what you said about the eye-closing makes a lot of sense. thank you very much. I'll try it.
 

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For three years I was an instructor in an Air Force special unit and one of my duties, beside teaching a bunch of desk flyers how to be GI Joes, was to teach each new class special tactics with an M-16, like how to night fire and instinct shooting. For about 95% of them, I had to teach them shooting basics first. In that three years I went through a couple thousand students and I never came across one that I thought I would have been able to teach them how to shoot over the internet.

I would strongly recommend you get some one on one with some very capable to teach you. Since you are active duty, I would think one of the range instructors would be willing to help you out. There were many times I would meet people at the range and give them one on one training.

One thing, that closing one eye, I hope that's only a momentary thing and you are not learning to shoot with one eye closed. If so, you are teaching yourself a bad habit. There are many on here that probably think it's fine to close one, but I'm not one of those. Back when I was a kid and the guy that taught me how to shoot made a simple little statement that I live by. Anything you can see with one eye open, you can see twice as good with both eyes open. Some very good shooters have a problem with double focus and use a frosted or a blocked out lens in their shooting glasses, but they don't close one.
 

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If you zeroed your sights to hit on at 100, you will be shooting low at 200. If you are aiming at the bottom of the 200 target, then you are going to have most of your shots hitting under the target,
As for closing the eye, it is not necessary in most cases. I have been shooting with both eyes open with scopes and aperture sights for years. Olympic target shooters shoot with both eyes open.
I think your problem is how you sighted in the rifle, not in how you shoot.
 

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My first rifle instructor was a SF guy, and man can he shoot. He had us zero our ARs at 50 which puts it back at zero at 200. So for 'combat accuracy' get your site picture on your target anywhere between 50 and 200 yards (man size target, center of mass) and you'll get a hit. In a combat situation a 5.56 round (or a couple) in an 8 inch area of a bad guy's COM will really make it suck to be him.

You'll obviously need to refine that approach if you are competition shooting.

As somebody mentioned; talk to a range instructor. And shoot as much Military ammo as they will give you. As a tax payer I'm more than happy to buy more.
 

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It's been a very long time since I've fired a rifle on a military range or shot any kind of AR, but your problem seems to me like it could be your trigger technique. Work on your trigger pull before you try the rifle on the range again. If the problem is your trigger squeeze, you can work on that without burning up ammunition. It does seem strange that the elevation was correct at 200 yards with a 100 yard zero though. Most .223/5.56 rounds would be a couple inches low.

Also remember that a rifle that holds a MOA group at 100 yards isn't guaranteed to hold it at 200. I believe that the S&W has a rifling rate of 1-9; so heavier bullets 60 grains+ may not stabilize well at longer range, and the sights your using aren't very conducive to long-range, pin-point accuracy.
 
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