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Jakesnake66 has a M77 that flinging bullets out in the bushes and sent pictures of the bedding. I'll use this new posting to answer his questions.

The Model 77 usually has six bedding points.
From back to front they are---
The pad around the rear tang screw. THis is a flat area and (as shown) can become compressed with too much torque.

The two pads on each side of the action near the rear of the magazine box. These flats support the middle of the action on each side of the center tang screw.

The flat behind the recoil lug and the rear of the recoil lug itself. The Model 77 has an angled front tang screw that assures full contact with the recoil lug and in all my years of messing with them have NEVER seen one not inletted correctly.

The last contact near the front are the two small pads near the front sling swivel that supports the barrel like a 'Vee block'.

The four contacts under the action are flat and level with each other and very easy to cut by machine. No fitting is needed (until somebody messes it up.).

The trouble starts when Gorilla Bubba decides to REALLY tighten the screws. The magazine box is steel and is supported by a simple clip in front but the rear of the magazine box is held in the stock by the front of the trigger guard, just like a Model 70 Winchester and the same applies to both guns. When the stock is compressed by the Gorilla with the screwdriver, the magazine box will NOT compress and suddenly becomes the stop surface that's pinched between the trigger guard and the action. That means the center screw is solid metal to metal in the center of the action but the front and rear can still be tightened. That puts a 'bow' in the action which un-seats the top recoil lug which flings bullets in the bushes instead of into a tight group.

Be sure the magazine box has about .010 'play' between the action and the front of the trigger guard. That keeps all three tang screws bearing against wood (or plastic) which has a dampening effect to the action.

The front bedding Vee blocks in the barrel channel should be about .010 to .020 'proud'. When the barreled action is put into the stock it should lay FLAT down on the bedding points IF the barrel is free floated, but the front guard screw should pull the action down to flat by about .010 to .020 if the barrel bedding is used. (I much prefer barrel pressure unless its a very heavy barrel)

NEVER use tang screws to glass bed an action. Use them as guides only. The action can NOT be under stress when it's bedded or the bedding job just makes the stresses permanent. Instead, wrap the action with surgical tubing, inner tube strips or even duct tape when glassing. Keep the action straight!

When assembling a rifle, hold the wood and metal together as you tighten tang screws. Feel how the metal reacts to torque. If it's not straight, solid and square, it won't shoot well. The amount of torque makes little difference, it is how that torque affects the action that's important.
 

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The Shadow (Super Mod)
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Oddly enough, I've never bedded one of my M77's. As JBelk mentioned it's the amount of tight that seems important. I gorilla the front tight, then the rest are just enough to not fall out.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Follow up with "groups" and suggestions to the shooter.

That's a bedding problem or a crown problem, I'd bet. The first thing is to look at the
crown. There could be a chunk broken off or bent in from impact.
Look close at the barrel channel right near the bottom from end to end to be sure there's
not a contact place. If so relieve it.

First step is supply a little upward pressure straight up on the barrel near the front sling
mount.
Cut shims from the back of a yellow pad about 1/4" wide and 1/2 long. Put them where the
contact point of the barrel used to be at the front end, laid lengthways in the channel one
about half way up from the bottom on one side and the other the same on the other side. Lay
the barrelled action back in and tighten JUST the front screw but look at the action when
tightening. You want it to 'suck down' about .010 to .020 between laying there and front
screw tight. Look at the rear tang, did it rise up any at all? IF so, the gun needs
bedding in the action section before continuing work. IF not, try to pull the barrel away
from the stock at the fore-end. It should take six to ten pounds pressure to separate them.
Install the other two screws....with the front screw tight, the other screws should NOT move
the action at all. If the rear screws affect the action, it means the action is NOT flat,
straight and solid as it should be and needs bedding help.

Load cheap bullets with a known 'good' load for testing. Until the rifle shoots random,
small groups and stops 'walking' there's no use burning expensive ammo.
 

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First step is supply a little upward pressure straight up on the barrel near the front slingmount. Cut shims from the back of a yellow pad about 1/4" wide and 1/2 long. Put them where the
contact point of the barrel used to be at the front end, laid length ways in the channel one
about half way up from the bottom on one side and the other the same on the other side. Lay
the barreled action back in and tighten JUST the front screw but look at the action when
tightening. You want it to 'suck down' about .010 to .020 between laying there and front
screw tight. Look at the rear tang, did it rise up any at all? IF so, the gun needs
bedding in the action section before continuing work. IF not, try to pull the barrel away
from the stock at the fore-end. It should take six to ten pounds pressure to separate them.
Install the other two screws....with the front screw tight, the other screws should NOT move
the action at all.
This is basically the way I re-bedded one of my Ruger M-77's. Only thing I used was brown plastic tape, length was in the barrel channel, a little behind the front stock sling mount, which [may] require two pieces on on top of the other to properly provide relieve some upward pressure. Then I install the front & rear screw to where they are just snug; after which I place my left hand over the barrel and forearm and the evenly tighten both stock/action screws to around 6-pounds torque. After whey are fully tighten, I then place my left hand over the barrel & forearm and slowly loosen the front screw, and there should be very little to no movement of the barrel springing out of the stock barrel channel. The rear of the action should be stable with no movement or rocking, and if there is some then the rear needs some attention.

I've also successfully bedded a Winchester Model 70 "Featherweight" (post '64) by glass bedding the entire barrel and action, and by placing a small washer in the front screw well in order to properly provide just enough bedding so when tighten it wouldn't cause undue pressure on the barrel. Then when I loosen the front screw there is NO upward movement of the barrel from the forearm of the stock. Again around 6-pounds of torque to both screws and the middle screw just tighten snug, on the Winchester M-70. This greatly improved accuracy.
 

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So, Jack, I note that the M77 Hawkeye (and the MkII, I believe...?) do _not_ have those very small 'pads' at the back of the magazine well. So, would you just not bed that part of the action?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If it has a screw holding bottom and top together, there should be support for the action around or either side of that middle screw. I haven't seen one so don't know. Take a picture of the action and inletting and we'll go from there.
 

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There's still a screw there, the flats just aren't there; it's just the bottom of the magazine well. I'll see if I can get a pic for you tomorrow, but all you need visualize is exactly what you have, but without the two small 'pad' areas you've mentioned. That middle screw does extremely little, though. One puts it in just tight enough to not fall out.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Most center screws are only there to hold the trigger guard in and don't affect bedding unless over-tightened. You're correct in 'just tight enough to save the screw'.
 

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Most center screws are only there to hold the trigger guard in and don't affect bedding unless over-tightened. You're correct in 'just tight enough to save the screw'.
This is correct. The middle screw should be just lightly tighten as to not place stress on the action.
 

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Yes. The question was about whether to bed in that area. One might just as well bed under the entirety of the receiver bottom/mag well if they're going to bed anywhere near that screw. My question was whether that's what you guys do with Rugers built in the last 20+ years, or if you just revert to bedding the recoil lug area and the rear tang area.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
MZ5-- Think of all the possible places to get a piece of scrap that measures .002 thick between the flat behind the recoil lug and the rear tang screw 'platform'. I prefer to leave clearance between critical places so I don't have to worry about that.

I had a 40XBBR many years ago that was just a marvel of consistency. Without wind and mirage, five went into less than .320" ALL the time. It was bedded with clear epoxy solid, front to rear of the action and an inch of the bull barrel. I could lay a strip of paper crossways the action bedding and show people a rifle that barely shot one inch groups. NOTHING different and it'd go right back to >.320 with that bit of .003 shim removed. I could lay a tiny scrap of paper in one corner of the recoil lug mortice and see the difference in the group. I learned more about bedding on that one rifle than all others combined because the changes were immediate and usually severe.

I bed what's important perfectly and relieve the rest by the thickness of electrical tape for a glass job, less than that in a hand bedded wood stock.
 

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The first thing to do is slip a business card lengthwise at the for end pressure point.
Now you need to align the trigger guard by snugging the angled screw first, then the rear, then center screw. Test the floorplate release and once it works proper loosen the angled screw 2 or 3 turns. Tighten the rear tang screw to just tight.
The card up front will be loose. Tighten the angled screw until the card can't be removed. Loosen the screw 1/4 turn at a time until the card can be pulled out, then tighten the screw 1/2 turn, done.
Make sure the barrel does not touch anywhere except the front pressure point.
 

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Here is a photo of my 77....it is a custom stock so it looks a little different than the one JBelk posted. I included his photo as a reference. Will I have a more difficult time with this stock as it does not look like there is a very large surface area at the front of the tang pressure point area.

Joel
 

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Discussion Starter #15
JW--

The rear end looks great but the front could use a little work. The far 'north-east' corner of the receiver is hitting the stock. The NW corner is in shadow but I'd bet they aren't hitting evenly as the screw is cinched down.
That would be a great candidate for glassing a smear on the rear surfaces and just the front end has enough glass to support the front of the action evenly when the front screw is tightened. Wrap the whole thing in surgical tubing so there is NO screw torque on the action as it cures. That leaves the action straight and without stress.
I scrape the flat bottom of the recoil lug area so you have a 'trash trap' for any debris so the tang screws pull straight and solid against the action.

To adjust barrel tension, if not free-floated, shim the four supporting flats with about a .020 thick paper or plastic. That raises the barrel by .020 or whatever you determine.
If you need more barrel pressure, shim with STRIPS laid long ways the channel, NOT crossways! (Very common error!).
Straight, Solid and Square equals Accuracy. If barrel pressure is exerted, it should be STRAIGHT up in relation to the action.

I was going to shoot my Cobra M-77 today but 33 deg. and rain with a stiff wind is not BR enjoyment weather. ;)
 

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This is one that I am trying to firm up for my Grandson. I shot it this past weekend for the first time in "forever". I have neglected it for a long time and the only loads I had were some Norma 100 gr. FMJ that I had done up for Turkey many years back. After sighting in with the new scope, I shot a couple of 1-1/2 inch groups @ 100 with 3 shots at about 3/4" and two others making the extra 3/4".

The trigger is kinda crappy and it was a little windy, but I expected a little better, hence the bedding question.

Would you mind pointing out the area of the recoil lug area you recommend scraping? I do intend to free float the barrel prior to shooting again. In my journal, I have some loads with the 95 gr. Nosler Partition with 4831 that I think I will try next.

Thanks again.

Joel
 

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Took a couple of other photos showing the "shaded" area you asked about. It does look as if there was a build up of oil finish in that area that I can remove. I also took a photo of under the barrel where the sling swivel mount is attached that shows a pressure point.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Here's the photos--

The front portion was glassed along with the chamber area of the barrel.

The red arrow shows the recoil shoulder. This is 90 degrees to the bore line so as the action goes in the bedding, it is scraping a little from that 'wall' and trapping it on the flat (black arrows). Scape the bottom so there's about .005 clearance.
M-77s have 'wall' sides, also. Install and remove the barreled action two or three times and look very closely at those internal corners to scrape clean any debris out before the last assemble.

BE SURE to relieve the notches in the magazine box front and rear so it is LOOSE in the recess. You should be able to wiggle it with a finger. Notice the front tang is very well bedded to the stock but the tang only touches the mag box and does not pinch it.
 

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Do you recommend bedding the rear portion of the barrel (chamber area), or is this something that was done just for this rifle?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I want the tang screws to be be near center of the bedding areas. The goal is solid contact with no stress. SO, I like to bed under the chamber and back to the front of the magazine box. NEVER tighten the tang screws when glass bedding. Let it just lay there held in place by elastic bands or tubing.

Straight, Solid and Square equals Accuracy. ;)
 
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