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I wonder if most people would tend to shoot a Ruger Redhawk or Super Redhawk more accurately than a Ruger Blackhawk or Bisley. I understand that a double action has a shorter locktime and so that should help to give smaller groups. I also wonder though about the grip differences. From what I have gathered most serious big game hunters use single actions, either the Ruger or Freedom Arms, so most must be able to shoot them well. I have a Ruger Bisley in 45 Colt and have not been able to consistently shoot small groups unless using my scope and a sandbagged benchrest. The gun is very accurate but I am not shooting it well. With a 2x scope attached and shooting from the bench with sandbag rest I can often get 2.5” to 3” groups at 50 yards. But without the scope my groups open up quite a bit. They are more like 2.5” at 25 yards. I will often get 3 shots in less than one inch but then the other shots will open up the group substantially. I am doing my best to be consistent but obviously am not. The shots that open the group up are usually high but not always. Sometimes they are low and sometimes they are right or left. Most often though is that I have vertical dispersion. Are double action grips easier to grip consistently? If I were to get a double action I would probably want one chambered to 454 Casull but would figure on mainly (probably only) shooting 45 Colt loads in it. Would accuracy suffer if I shot 45 Colt loads in a 454 Casull chamber? Thanks, Brian.
 

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hi Brian Carlson,

I think the best improvement on a revolver SA or DA is the trigger job to become this reolver more accurate.

With a SA mecanism it is easy for a good gunsmith to reduce the trigger pull, and to reduce this very low compare to a DA revolver.

In all cases the bullet out a SA goes faster than with a DA revolver between 35-70 fps more.

All my revolvers have a trigger job done, I have 2 DA and 3 SA. The trigger pull is a little bit light on my SA revolvers than my DA revlovers.

I have never shoot in sitting position, with sandbags and any of my revolver have a scope. But the group at 25 m is good off hands with all of guns (my guns are more accurante than me!!!).

My best advice is : find a good gunsmith to do a perfect trigger job. After that, shoot off hand without scope with this gun. This with the same load as now and compare the difference of accuracy. I think you will reduce the group at 25 yards.

P.S. after trigger job done pull the trigger very slowly to be surprised by rapid firing.

Just my 0.02 cts. Cheers.
 

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Brian,
I'm in the same boat as you are. My first "serious" handgun was the Super Blackhawk that I got at the beginning of last summer. After a considerable learning curve and load development (mostly matching the bullets to the gun) I found that I could shoot it real well off of sandbags. But I could not get consistent groups from either a standing or sitting position and it seemed that tiny changes in my grip made big differences in my groups. After tinkering with a GP-100 I found I shot much better offhand with it than with the SBH, even though the SBH was more accurate from sandbags. So I traded my SBH for a 629. In terms of pure accuracy off the sandbags it is about the same as the SBH (though not as finicky about loads!) but I shoot it FAR better offhand. Just my limited experience! ID
 

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Interesting question - and my results are similar with those already stated: I am more accurate with DA sixguns than SA's.

What I have found most interesting is that I am more consistent while shooting standing, off hand via DA rather than single action (20-25 yards). However, at long range, there is no comparison when I shoot with some sort of rest support (back knees, Creedmore etc)....single action wins hands down over dbl action.

Brian, I have owned a Redhawk and currently own (and will continue to own!) a SRH. I prefer the SRH hands down (even though it is U-G-L-Y by comparison!) Note....if you plan to shoot mostly 45 Colt from your SRH, my experience has been you will need to shoot moderate to full power loads to get accuracy. The faster the better. Cowboy type loads don't print worth a hoot from my SRH. I assume this is due to its slow rate of twist. My Redhawk shot all power levels quite accurately but beat my hand to death with heavy loads.
 

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I'm inclined to agree with our Euro friend BER007. There's nothing like a trigger job to improve accuracy.

Having "Used Up" a couple of perfectly good handguns over the years, I've not noted any real advantage SA/DA with a quality handgun. But I've packed some of the worst one's off for a trigger job, with super results.

With stiff recoiling HG's I have found that starting out with reduced loads is a good idea. The milder loads generally give good results, and the confidence acquired will mentally prepare you to shoot better.

Because I'm a wimp, I usually never exceed 50 rounds of .44Mag. at a session (usually 25). I backfill with moderate .357's/.38's, and I never leave for a session with less than 150 rounds of .22 ammo.
 

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Brian,Do you intend to shoot most of your shots SA ? I was taught and subsequently taught others to shoot double action when our Dept. carried SW 686 revolvers. After that I had a **** of a time shooting anything single action, I had to re-teach my self on a ruger 22 pistol. I guess the thing I am trying to say tactfully as possible is you cant buy a good single action group, it comes from much practice preformed properly. You can learn to shoot anything well with practice. At least 200 rounds per week for a while. The fact that your gun shoots well from sandbags says it may be the operator having trouble, just practice alot, Again I am not trying to be a (jerk), just telling you what I have seen in 18 yrs of teaching firearms...............regards Ogre
 

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Ogre, I'll have to agree with you. I too was taught to fire my service weapon DA. I retired after 25 years on a metro p.d. and the range officers DID NOT want anyone shooting single action (when we carried S&W revolvers). Of course the main reason was no one (according to firearm review reports) fired a weapon at a suspect in a shootout SA. Just a few days ago I fired my S&W model 629, 44 mag and had better results DA standing compared to benchrest SA. I really can't explain it. But, the range officers know best. They taught me well. I do however, need to find a qualified gunsmith to reduce the DA trigger pull.
 

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I shoot my SRH with scope SA. I can't get used to the long DA trigger pull.
My best position (right handed) is sitting ,slightly reclining against a back rest of some sort with my right leg extended and my left knee raised. I assume the two handed position with the butt of the grip (Hogue soft rubber)on top of my knee. I haven't seen this described anywhere. I just fell into it by accident but it really works well for me. A hard sharp edged grip might make this impossibly painful. I made some crossed sticks to play with but the former position works better.
 

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Brian,
I have a 45LC Ruger Bisley. I think your problem may stem from a few things. I don't know how much you shoot or how big of a person you are. I'm 6' and a 190 lbs and I have to practice very regularly to not be fatigued by the heft a a 7 1/2" barrelled Bisley. The gun is hefty, not nearly like a SRH, but plenty hefty and it takes a good bit of practice to keep the big revolver steady and to shoot it well. One other thing I had done to my revolver was to have the throats in the cylinder opened up to the proper diameter, the Rugers are undersize in relation to the barrel. This modification is cheap, about $60, and it improved the accuracy of the piece immensly. It also handles full power loads with much less pressure signs now. The main thing is to practice frequently. You'll likely find that after a 100 rounds of off hand shooting that you will begin to have a difficult time shooting the gun well as a result of fatigue in the front shoulder muscles. You could be a big muscle man for all I know, but this is the problem I have encountered after not shooting frequently with large revolvers. Get a trigger job, it makes all the difference and is not terribly expensive. I highly reccomend the "ruger and t/c only" loads in the Hornady #5 manual. My personal favorites are the maximum loads with H110 or WW296.

Good luck.
 

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This is an interesting thread, one I hope will continue. In my own case I've found that I can shoot a DA revolver significantly more accurate in most instances than a like-cartridge SA. This is especially true when there is any kind of time constraint at all. The only time I use single action is when I'm firing from a sandbagged rest and can take all the time I need to shoot the smallest group possible. I can't remember the last time I shot single action offhand. For me the double action is less prone to pulled shots from my flinching.

As for impoving the revolver's action, do a bunch of dry-firing before you send it off to be "tuned." I've seen a number of perfectly good sixguns get turned into expensive projects once some "gunsmith" started to fool with it. Dry firing doesn't cost you anything in dollars, will smooth out many rough spots in the action, and will improve your own trigger control and sight alignment abilities.
 
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