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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
More Intel on Vista ammo takeover of Remington ammo. It is easy to make rimfire ammo. It’s not easy to make a yearly profit on it. The Speer bro’s, Ray and Dick, tore their hair out before little CCI got into the black. It’s still volitive, but now they know what to do. I think their next coup will be lead free priming. I will keep my ears open, but keep looking for a #325 small pistol primer to come out. They attach a phenol molecule to their priming mix which kicks things up a notch. They require a larger flash hole to keep primers from backing out. Rim fires still require rolled lead wire to make heel crimped bullets, so true lead free rim fires are a ways out?? This impending change may be the reason for the primer shortages??
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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"Speer/CCI" is part of Vista. Even earlier when they were part of ATK, they were relegated to being Federal's..... Because selling factory ammo was more profitable, and chasing Federal contacts more juicy than the reloading market.

Leaf free primers already exist, and they have a short shelf life.
So if you're one of the folks who would take most of a lifetime to use 5,000 primers; by the time you got around to them, they'd be long dead.

Cheers
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Those #325 small pistol primers are used in the 45 G A P. I don’t know if they are lead free, but CCI won’t sell them retail. But Remington made their name with Kleanbore priming. I got a box of off brand 45 acp ammo with small pistol primers under TMJ bullets. No adds about lead free priming, but they came from a Lewiston Indoor shooting range. They were supposed to be shot there?? I ‘ll keep asking the local lights whenever possible about how they plan on introducing phenol based priming with their larger flash holes. I donated my spare brick of large pistol primers to my son in law, so I have to replace it, tomorrow?? If the weekly Sportsman’s Warehouse truck finally has some on it.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Albeit a bit dated, this speaks to the ignition issues I spoke of(from a WSTIAC (DoD) primer study)


 
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Lead free primers already exist, and they have a short shelf life.
So if you're one of the folks who would take most of a lifetime to use 5,000 primers; by the time you got around to them, they'd be long dead.
Cheers
"short shelf life." is a little scary, can you quantify 'short'? If you're loading (or buying factory ammo) for home defense or CCW, I could see one's 'inventory' becoming quite old before being depleted, given it's [hopefully] limited use. With that purpose in mind, the last thing you want to hear when you pull the trigger is...'CLICK'!
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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"short shelf life." is a little scary, can you quantify 'short'?
Like everything, the honest answer is: "It depends". But look for failure rate to advance significantly, around the decade mark.
The "issue" is the DDNP itself, and while I'm not sure; I suspect that's why the output variation in the testing. DDNP has a very high propensity to absorb moisture, much higher potential than lead styphanate. As DDNP is a purely synthesized thing, and not a metallic salt; moisture gain and loss is more detrimental to it.

So if you lived somewhere very dry, like here or phoenix and run your AC all the time; The shelf life is going to be much longer. If you live somewhere humid, and especially if you don't store your components in a climate controlled environment; things are going to begin failing much quicker.

Again it comes down to details and practicality. Take a real hard honest look at the bulk of the posts by the vocal long-term members here. Most don't actually shoot much at all anymore. Don't misunderstand that to be a negative judgement, simply an observation of fact. Those folks are quite likely to run into more frequent failures, than those of us who shoot larger amounts with regularity. Does that mean 80% failure rates, magically when the calendar jumps to a mystically ordained month? Of course not. What it means is the failure rate will begin to climb at an elevated rate compared to, what they are used to with classic compounds.

Cheers
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Simple answer is..................shoot lots and pays your money to replace components (lots of money!)

In my dry climate, primers should last several hundred years or more.;) Yes, as age advances, the range time is less and less.
 

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In all honesty I've shot more in the last 5 years than in the 10 before. . Because I'm retired yippee. . More time to play .. but I have been a little stingy with my ammo in the last year ... and if primers are going to become undepindable .. I'll stash away the good stuff and shoot up the new ones
 
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