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Should you use thread lock for base and ring screws when mounting a scope on a .270? I'm mounting my first scope so is there anything else a person needs to know other than putting it where you want it and tighten it down? Refering back to an older post, I went with the Vortex 2-7. I just ordered it today and i havn't even seen one. Didn't hear anything negative about it so i figured i'd give one a try.

Thanks for all your help,
Jim
 

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Nope, you won't need threadlocking material.

Make sure the screws actually tighten the base down, not bottom out in the hole first

If using two piece bases, make sure the bases are aligned properly. Check with a strait edge while tightening the screws. Also check the bases are perfectly level across the tops. You may have to do some shimming

Make sure the reticle is truly verticle

When setting the scope in place I like to wear my hunting clothes and adjust the scope in the rings until the image is just right.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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I always use low-strength threadlocker (blue or green). May not be "needed" but doesn't seem to hurt.
 

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I'm with Mike, I always use Loc-tite (not RED!) on the screws for the bases. I figure I may change the scope at some point, but the bases are likely to be there a while.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Blue or green locktite for me on the bases. NEVER on the ring screws! :eek:
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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I just bought an inch-pound torque wrench today. May have to review my procedures .....

I have had base screws come loose that weren't loctited (is that a word?). Once bitten, twice shy..... I don't know that ring screws need loctite, but I do put a dab of "liquid electrical tape" compound between the scope and rings to keep scopes from slipping. It may have a more useful effect of keeping me from over-torquing them, though.
 

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I've done it both ways, with locktite and without. Never had a problem with either one but some blue locktite on the base screws can't really hurt. Just barely snug the rings down and then get the eye relief set correctly and the vertical crosshair truly vertical. Then tighten everything down and you should be ready to bore sight and zero.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Didn't say what rifle/scope kit you're using, but a word of advice.

Although a big Ruger fan, I've found the supplied rings will have a sharp edge that must be broken to avoid ring marks on a scope, no matter how gently you tighten the rings down. I use emry cloth to do this. Being gunshy on rings anymore, all of them, not matter the brand, get this treatment.

Mike you're suggestion of the liquid electrial tape makes sense to me. My ring alignment and lapping kit helps in squaring things up and making it so the scopes don't move around in the rings, too.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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I just tried out the torque wrench last night. Nice toy to have and I will be using it from now on. If it helps avoid stripping one screw it will be well worth the cost!
 

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I always use blue loctite, not only does it prevent the screws from becoming loose but it also seals the threads to prevent rust & corosion should the gun ever be used in a wet/damp environment. I also always lap the rings, just about every set benifits greatly from lapping and you get a much better grip with far less torque on the screws.
 

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I always degreased and blue LocTited the base screws. I also tapped the top of the screwdriver to help set the threads. As MikeG has already mentioned, Scotchkote will absolutely prevent the scope from slipping in the rings. Lapping the rings won't hurt. Acraglass between the base and the receiver can help a poorly supported base without having to machine the base or the receiver true. Heavy use or recoiling rifles may call for redrilling and tapping the mount holes from 6-48 to 8-40. Burris Signature rings with the self centering inserts work very well.
 

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I have been using a ring cutting tool on all my scopes as of this year. It is like lapping but more aggressive. It is amazing how much error I have seen in overall alignment. Take my Kimber 8400 300 WSM; I used a Leupold once piece base and Leupold medium rings. The ring cutter is a giant side mill bit. You align the rings for windage and identify front and rear ring tops by marking the muzzle edge of each with 1 dot or 2. This will allow removal and reinstallation in the same position and direction. You then start to snug the rings down on the cutter with the ring screws. Making sure there is sufficient cutting oil on the cutter, you spin the cutter with a wrench while continuing to tighten the rings. The idea is that the cutter will shave the rings on a perfect plane to each other. After about 10 turns remove the rings and examine. On the Kimber, the rear ring was being cut evenly, so it was true. The front ring was being cut on the leading edge at 6 o'clock. I continued the process focusing on the front ring only until the cut face covered 75% of the ring. You have to mind the amount of space between the upper and lower ring portions though. You can easily cut yourself out of compression range doing this (meaning the ring can't be tightened down on the scope before the upper and lower are contacting each other). In theory this removes torque on the scope, the potential of ring damage on the scope and provides the maximum hold for the minimum torque by maximizing surface contact between the ring and scope.
 

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I have done the lapping thing on numerous occasions, and I am a believer in its virtues, but now I simply use Burris Signature rings. Viola! No more alignment issues, or scope damage and ring marks, and easy to add some up for long range.

Truly the best thing since sliced bread
 

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jus don t think you can get away with using jb weld to mount a red dot on a shotgun.. i gotta scar right between my eyes to remind me of the limitations of j b weld..:D pretty good stuff though... live an learn ..slim :)
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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My Goodness! Thank the Lord it wasn't in one of your eyes, Slim!

Have often wondered about the strength of glues and epoxys for firearm work other than bedding. A fellow range officer tried using Gorilla Glue to replace the front sight blade on a black powder revolver. Made less than a cylinder of shots before the sight fell off again. Its now at the range gunsmith's shop to be soldered on.
 

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If you have ever tried to remove bases that have been secured with Loc-Tite, you will never use it again. If you REALLY need to secure the screws, use plain old rubber cement. It holds well, stays pliable and can easily be removed without buggering the screw heads.
 
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