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Discussion Starter #1
Several weeks ago I purchased a Henry Long Ranger in 308 Win. That is the lever action with the detachable box magazine. Beautiful rifle complete with open sights and Skinner scope mounts. Fit and finish excellent. I mounted my Leupold 3 x 9 x 40 and headed for the range. The rifle balanced well with the scope. First thing I noticed was that the length of pull at 14" is much too long for my short stocky frame. I had a hard time getting any kind of accuracy with factory loads of several brands and bullet weights. I had the stock cut to fit and tried again a few days afterwards. Figured with proper stock fit I would do better. Best I could get was 3" to 4" groups at 100 yards. Reading on the Henry web page I discovered that the barrel is supposed to be free floated. This one was very tight against the forearm. Also, ejection and extraction was iffy.

Henry sent me a prepaid UPS label and I returned the rifle. I heard nothing from them after three weeks and called to check on it. All they would say was they were working on it. A week later and still no news so I called again. Same story, so I sent Customer Service an email requesting news regarding my rife. I got an immediate reply explaining that they were working on the accuracy problems and I would receive the gun within a week. Within a week I got the gun. Only they had replaced it. They also returned the stock that I had cut to fit. I doubt many other places would have done that.

The new rifle is really nicer than the original. It is also smoother out of the box. On Wednesday I hit the camp shooting range with several brands and weights of bullets. It was grouping 1 1/4 tp 1 1/2 MOA with most everything I shoot, including a couple of my reloads. I am going to stick with the 150 grain Barnes TTSX I am reloading for now. I had no issues with ejection and extraction.

I suspect accuracy will improve with rounds down range. I am going in to West Monroe this afternoon to the shop where I bought the gun. I am sure the gunsmith that services the shop has the tool to replace my stock. It requires a socket on an extension and I have none that will fit down the channel to reach the nut that attaches the stock to the frame.

Overall I am pleased with the gun. I do not expect that lever action to equal the tack driving accuracy of my bolt actions. This one may come close, however.


I have the worst luck when it comes to lemons. I have seldom bought a new firearm or scope that did not have to be immediately returned for some significant functional issue. Henry came through on their guarantee. Sending my original stock back was a nice touch I did not expect. I suppose I could have requested that when I sent in the gun, but did not think of it.
 

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It's unfortunate the pursuit of profit outweighs the production of quality products. Not just this industry but all. I am so tired of being force fed shiny junk so share holders can get their dividends.

It's nice that they eventually made you happy with the gun. It seems the acceptable number of failures in production has risen to the level of my foregoing new products for seeking out used in good shape.

Sorry about the rant but sometimes..............
 

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It sounds like in the end, Henry did the right thing and took care of things. Many companies would have returned the gun as out of warranty due to the cutting of the stock.

Henry has a great warranty...I sure hope they offer that warranty because the product is superior and they don't expect to get many back. We can all probably point to companies that increased their warranty while lowering their internal quality control, thereby shifting QC to the customer....which is a pain for the customer that gets the Friday at 3 pm gun.

Anyway, I plan to add a Henry to my safe this year...I just need to pick one. I sure hope I get one that lives up to the quality reputation that Henry promotes in it's advertisements. I'm going into this confident that Henry will deliver.
 

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If you think about the process for a moment you could come to the conclusion that it's rather amazing that we don't hear a lot more about "accuracy" issues. All the work that goes into making these items from making the parts then putting them together, a quick function check and "out the door" they go. No manufacturer has the time to "test" the accuracy of each rifle in depth that they make. Just ain't possible (unless they're a custom maker) so to get the quality that we do get kinda amazes me really. IMO most are doing a pretty darn good job and as long as the company stands behind their product and will "make things right" and other than the inconvenience for us individually that's about all we can ask. Most do. The only gun I ever sent back for a problem was one of the new (at the time) 4 inch Ruger Redhawk 45 colts. It simply would not shoot with any accuracy at all. Short story, sent it back to Ruger and they fixed it. They sent a note back with it saying the cylinder didn't line up with the frame correctly. I think they replaced everything but the grips.....:) Has been shooting fine since. So, it happens.
 

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The current atmosphere makes firearms makers particularly sensitive to warranty and manufacturing faux pas. It's much less expensive to eat repair replacement than head for court. So many nowadays are quick to litigate so a quick and cheap resolution is paramount to survival in today's market. Seems to me getting it right before it ships would make more sense but I'm nobody..............with unlimited access to an attorney. Unfortunate isn't it how no matter the approach you still lose.
 

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It would be pretty difficult to sue a rifle manufacturer for making an "inaccurate" rifle (to who's standards) as long as it met "specs". And as long as they're willing to fix any issue the consumer has (within reason) I think that's about as good as you can ask for. I read far to many posts about folks that are shooting 1/2 MOA (?) and better with their factory rifles to believe in the (make the consumer the QC) theories when not to many years ago ANY factory rifle that would shoot an inch at 100 was an excellent shooter. Nowadays that rifle would go to the back of the safe if all is to be believed. Which I don't. :rolleyes:
 

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As long as the clunkers are the exception rather than the rule( Remlin) and they stand behind and make things right, then you cannot complain.
Remlin did turn out some rifles with bad wood to metal fit, rough actions, and sights canted, right after the take over by The Freedom Group/Cerebrus.
I looked at a couple different Guide guns during that time period, and the wood to metal fit was poor and the actions rough.

I wouldn't buy any Marlin made between the 2008 take over, and 2011 or so.
After that they got their act together and the two I have, one .45/70 and one .45 Colt, are without any issues, and very accurate to boot.
Some guys will repeat till the end of their days that ALL Remlins are junk, but that is not the case.
They are good to go now, so you can quit saying that clunkers are the rule with Marlin.
 

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I have the worst luck when it comes to lemons. I have seldom bought a new firearm or scope that did not have to be immediately returned for some significant functional issue.
Man that would stink. It would really make the warranty a significant factor in deciding on a purchase though.
 

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Glad to hear Henry stood up and took care of business with you.

I had a great experience with S&W a few years back. They tightened up endshake on a revolver I purchased used and didn't charge me a dime, not even for shipping at either end. I sent an email to their customer service department thanking them for extending that service to me even though they were under no obligation to do so. Might I encourage you to do the same with Henry?? As someone who once worked in the service industry, I can tell you that a kind word from a satisfied customer for a job well done is always well received. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
t has been my intention to contact Customer Service and thank them especially for sending my modified stock back. I did not expect that. I am pleased with the replacement rifle, but I did want to run some more rounds down range before I got back to them.

I have a significant conglomeration of rods, screws and wire holding my lower back together. I recently added a spinal stimulator to the mix to help with the chronic pain. It did help. That is, until I began throwing bags of corn around with the younger guys. For the past several weeks I have been laying low, pondering my stupidity and being barely able to walk, much less shoot anything. Good news is, by the end of this weekend I should be good to go. Fully one year older after tomorrow and, I hope, at least that much wiser.
 
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A note for people to keep in mind: The industry standard turnaround time for firearm warranty work is a month and a half.


[points at this thread] This is why good customer service is always worth the cost, in this industry, and any company that believes otherwise are fools. In the 1960s, how many people would have heard the original poster talk about his inaccurate Henry if he hadn't sent it in for work? Dozens? Today, he can quite easily tell this story to hundreds of thousands of people with the same amount of effort.
As people have already demonstrated, it's also hard to get people to change their opinions back after they get it in their head that "[insert brand] has been junk since [insert event]."


So, even if they ended up losing money replacing the original poster's rifle, in the short run, they save money in the long run by making sure that people don't think of them in a negative light.
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
My second rifle went back to Henry with a request for a refund of my purchase price. Henry complied with no questions asked. I have to give them credit for excellent customer service.

Initially I had thought this rifle would be a shooter after my first session with it. During subsequent sessions, however, I began having problems. I tried 6 brands of ammo and three different bullet weights. I was able to get an occasional inch and a half group, but nothing consistent. I checked bases and rings and everything was tight. Most groups were in the 3" to 4" range. Two different factory loads would not chamber in the rifle, one of them being a Winchester match load. I forget the other one. Some of the factory loads were extremely difficult to extract. At times it took an extraordinary effort on the lever to accomplish extraction. It also had ejection problems. I could get fired brass to eject sometime by tilting the rifle toward the side of the ejection port so that the brass would fall out. Sometime this would work. Otherwise the fired brass would often not fall out of the ejection port, even with very vigorous working of the lever. At other times a vigorous working of the lever would flip the extracted brass around in the action and there it would lay facing the direction opposite of the way it should. What times the fired brass extracted and ejected, ejection was limited to the brass simply falling out of the rifle. I put some light oil on the ejector but could notice no improvement.

After having the problems I had with factory loads I attempted to shoot some of my reloads that I shoot out of my Ruger Scout Rifle. These would not chamber and getting them back out took a herculean pull on the lever. I never got to pull the trigger on one. I am beginning to believe there is a design flaw working here, with both chamber and ejection issues. Funny, the internet videos of reviews of the Long Ranger tell of exceptional accuracy. In a couple you can see the shooter manually ejecting fired brass with his fingers, or tilting the rifle so that the brass would fall out, although this was never mentioned in any of them.

After expending considerable range time and also money for various brands and bullet weights of ammo on two rifles, I lost all desire for the Henry Long Ranger. Even had accuracy been acceptable there was no way to live with the other issues. Again, hats off to Henry for refunding my money. It was the ethical thing to do, but I believe few would have done so with no questions asked. It was almost too easy. Makes me think maybe a lot of rifles have been sent back with those issues.
 

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To bad that you had that experience. I too had to send a Golden Boy back that I had cut the stock to 12" LOP. They replaced the barrel and sent the rifle back with my shortened stock on it.

My Henry rifles are long gone now. I prefer to stick with the New and Old Marlins that I have along with a new Winchester and old Winchester.

Not knocking Henry but the Marlins have been great. I like them a lot better.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The issues I had with the Henry are ones which I thought had been perfected by the industry a long time ago. And Henry has been making guns for a long time. Frankly, I am perplexed that I would get any gun with those issues, much less two. I mean, regardless of how accurate a gun is, faultless chambering and extraction/ejection is crucial.
 

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Henry & a couple other makers put out what they call all weather rifles. The Henry lever all weather is chrome molly steel with a corrosion resistant coating. There is no all weather protection for the bore. I realize Henry makes a decent rifle but leaving the bore unprotected is not an all weather rifle to me. If they used stainless or a chrome plated bore this would be different. There are those especially newer shooters that believe the all weather characterization. To me this is false advertising.
 

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Henry is experiencing a lot of growing pains right now and depending on what you read you will see a wide variety of opinions on the make in general - from an almost ‘Worship’ - like love for them to downright hate for the brand.
Like any relatively new product there will be issues and I see with my own Henry areas that could be improved upon.
Personally I think Henry is spreading themselves too thin and producing way too many models and variations and quite honestly I have read about more increasing returns to the factory in the last couple years than I ever have but in all fairness some of the issues they are being returned for are not reall problems per se’ and could be considered an owner maintenance issue.
Henry seems to have garnered a large part of their market from ‘neyophyte’ gun owners who have little or no gun experience at all and simply do not have any experience with the ‘idiosyncrasies’ that can come with new guns.
Those of us who ARE experienced understand none are perfect and quite often simply deal with the small issues as ‘par for the course’ with new gun ownership.
For example let’s say we buy a new 1911 and the trigger is a little rough. The experienced 1911 owner will most likely tear it down for a good cleaning and inspection and if necessary maybe clean & polish up the parts a bit but never think of sending it back for something like this.
On the other hand I have read of Henry owners sending their rifles back for similar issues - and often lessor things.
I have read where some fellt their rifle should go back because it was too dirty upon receipt or a sight was not centered. Also I am reading about a lot of Henry owners discovering some possible major issues after taking it home when a more thorough inspection at the LGS would have revealed it then and it could have been refused.
All in all I think Henry is a better than average rifle but like anything may be less than perfect and needs to be inspected carefully before receiving it and understand guns are a very ‘owned centered’ item and require maintenance and it helps to gain a working knowledge of them so minor modifications and repairs can be accomplished by the owner.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
I am a little leary of doing much to a brand new rifle that is not functioning properly for fear of voiding the warranty. Accuracy issues can be illusive to track down and very expensive when it comes to ammunition. Especially when shooting reloads voids the warranty on most of them if you admit to doing it. I start off with factory ammo because if the gun will not shoot and cycle factory ammo, I don't want it. I am capable of doing most simple fixes. I certainly do not want to void a warranty working on something that should have been right when it left the factory. Nor am I going to pay a gunsmith to fix something that should have been right as it came from the factory. I will add that when the first rifle I bought had problems I took it back to the gun shop and had the gun smith look at it. He could not see anything he could do with it without shooting it and taking it apart. He is a decent gun guy and had built some good shooting rifles.

I am not saying a gun has to be perfect from the factory. It should, however, shoot reasonably accurately and chamber and eject rounds of decent quality factory ammo. If it has accuracy issues or other issues that I cannot solve by using different ammo, tighten up loose sights or screws, etc. or if it fails to chamber and/or extract factory ammo, I am sending it back. I do think had the fix on the first gun I got been simple, Henry would have fixed it instead of replacing it.
 
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