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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have had a houseful of company for the last few days and being an early riser, I thought I would spend my time up WAY earlier than everyone else this morning to get a little loading done. I had sized, cleaned, and primed some RP 204 Ruger Brass last week and decided to load up the 40 I had prepped with a new powder.

Everything went according to plan...charged up 20 cases with my new Vihta Vouri N130 powder and went to seat some 32 gr. Nosler Varmageddon bullets. I thought I had left the seating dies close to where I had in the past, but being safe I backed off the seating plug. All good and well, BUT I had screwed the lock ring back up to assist with fitting the die in the box (Hornady Custom Grade Dies). This is my only set of Hornady dies and I have penned my frustration with them in previous posts, but found another reason to dislike them. If I had re-set them correctly, I would not have had this happen and being a fairly unfamiliar die set, I should have been more careful.

Just one case...but still. You can bet I'm going to recover that primer though. :D

204 boo boo.jpg
 

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Seriously? Why would you alter the die setting just to fit it in the die box? Once a die gets set where you want it, never change it. I've never had any trouble fitting them in the box either, though not always the way most do. Of course, I've never been one to let a die set outsmart me either.
 
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I feel your pain. Done this occasionally myself. I am currently loading a .256 Maximum and use .256 magnum dies to do this. When sizing, I use a small spacer made from 1/4 inch sheet steel. If I forget to insert the spacer, I get crushed shoulders like that. Also in doing a lot of .44 Magnum shooting, I would sometimes want a little heavier crimp with certain bullet/loads. Can't say how many times I've crushed cases with too heavy a crimp. Since then, I have acquired several different .44 dies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Seriously? Why would you alter the die setting just to fit it in the die box? Once a die gets set where you want it, never change it. I've never had any trouble fitting them in the box either, though not always the way most do. Of course, I've never been one to let a die set outsmart me either.
Because I have about 10 different bullets for that caliber. Glad you never made a mistake though. Must be hard patting yourself on the back since you never made an error that had no real consequences. My point was to share an error I made that "might" help a fellow forum member especially dealling with the Hornady Custom Die set.

Good luck and all the best.
 

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That makes for an interesting conversation piece. If you fill it with some lead shot you could make a small candle holder from it (birthday size). Good thing it was only a one time mistake and hope you've got plenty of brass.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Oddly enough, that exact brass destruction happens in my 204 as well. I'm sure I've probably had it happen from one reason or another(usual a die catches), but can only recall it happening with the 204.

Frustrating indeed

cheers
 
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Because I have about 10 different bullets for that caliber. Glad you never made a mistake though. Must be hard patting yourself on the back since you never made an error that had no real consequences.…
Anyone can avoid this error by making dummy cartridges with each bullet they load. Use these dummy cartridges to set up you seating die for each particular bullet, I’ve done this for decades. Easy to do, not sure why some folks refuse to take this fool-proof route. Self-righteously chastizing someone who questions your method sounds kinda like a liberal who attacks you for not thinking like they do…



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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Anyone can avoid this error by making dummy cartridges with each bullet they load. Use these dummy cartridges to set up you seating die for each particular bullet, I’ve done this for decades. Easy to do, not sure why some folks refuse to take this fool-proof route. Self-righteously chastizing someone who questions your method sounds kinda like a liberal who attacks you for not thinking like they do…



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Pot...Meet Kettle.
 

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why i never!!!!! nope, not me. it ain't gonna happen to me. no sir. nope.

if you believe that, then i gots a bridge you can buy.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Settle down, fellas......
 

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Seems a good place to mention this.





Not all shell holders are the same.

Having a bunch of old stuff (pacific, Lee, Lyman, RCBs, etc.) it didn’t occur to me at first.


Tale:

Finishing loading a bunch of .45 acp, just changed (put away adjusted) .243 dies to full length resize (was feeding a Rem 742).


Shell holder should work...didn’t change that.


Shell holder ran into the bottom of the die BEFOR a full press stroke (could have happened the other way around and the sized cases weren't really full length sized).

Got to measuring the actual depth the shell holders….they were’t all the same between brands (call it a “DUH” moment).

Could be carefully used to an advantage (if you really think about it first)...but normally will keep THAT shell holder with THOSE dies.
 

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Well I don't use the same die's on more than one rifle! Every set I have is set up for one rifle and the lock rings locked in and left. Have two 243 rifles and both have their own set of dies and both set's Partial size the case for a particular rifles chamber. One set will size case's that fit in both rifles but the case's from the other set work only in the rifle they were set for. I just can't find a reason to reset the dies for a rifle everytime I sit down to load up some ammo. What rifle the dies are adjusted for is written on the box.
 

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It's those pesky Bench Fairies ... they come out at night and play dirty tricks on you .
Resetting stuff and hiding things ... How many times you know good and well you have something ... but you look all over and can't find it ...Bench Fairies ... they move and hide your stuff .
It could also be the work of a Gnome ...make sure your loading area is secure if the Gnomes can get inside they will also do mischief ...the Gnomes usually live in the Garden ...
I have a Garden Gnome that must be kept out of my reloading building ...He takes things from inside , especially tools , and hides them outside .
I know because not one of my children ever takes a tool and leaves it in the grass for me to find with the lawn mower ... They claim it's all the Garden Gnome's work !
But the Bench Fairies are the ones who mess with set dies and hide things inside ...
watch for them ... they are very elusive !
Gary
 

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Use the dummy cartridges as well. Write specs on side of shell in sharpie, Model 700 for example. I've made this mistake as well.
 

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Turret presses have some disadvantages, but leaving dies set in the turret is a huge advantage. Then all that need be done is adjust the seater depth using a dummy or other method. Easy-peasy.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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I guess I'm the oddball in the group, in terms of dies.
I feed 2 different 308's and 3 different Creedmoors, only have one set of dies for each cartridge.

I guess I don't see adjusting a die for what I want, when I want; as any sort of hardship or drawn out production. 🤷


The real question, did you save the primer??

Cheers
 

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THAT new wildcat is going to suffer hard extraction!

I've never used the set screw on the locking ring. I keep them loose on the die and re-set each time.
 
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