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When I first got my NEI mould for my .45/70 I tried crimping Lyman gas checks on by sizing the bullet to .460. They would fall right off. I am now trying out a new gas check available for .45 cal. Bullet Swaging Supply down in Louisiana is now making a check suitable for sizing to .460 (or larger). The check mikes .468 prior to sizing, and holds on quite well on the 300 or so bullets I put them on a week or so ago. Have started some load development with the 460 gr slugs, and accuracy thus far has been good. Recoil with these loads will definitely get your attention. More serious development work will await the arrival of a Glove lever from Dave Clay.
If anyone is interested, price on these things runs about $22 a thou. BSS doesn't have a website, but can be reached during the evening at (318)387-3266.
Good shooting
Mark
 

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For those looking for gas checks from .512 on down, call:
Bullet Swaging Supply, Inc.
(318) 387-7257 (w)
(318) 387-3266 (h)
 

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For those who have a large suppy of the .45 Hornady gas checks, and don't want to waste them, but are having trouble keeping them on when sizing to .460, here's a little tip I got from Marshall. Simply open up the gas check shank .002", and those Hornady's will stick on like they were welded on. Marshall used a lathe to open his up. My technique was a little cruder, but just a effective.

All you need is a dial caliper, 1/8" piece of dowel rod about 4-6" long, and some 320 grit emory paper. Carefully measure the inside width of the gas check shank of your mold several times with your dial calipers. Try to use as consistent amount of pressure as possible to insure accurate measurements. Once you're sure of the measurement, write it down, so you don't forget. Now wrap some 320 grit emory paper around your dowel rod very tightly, all the way down to the bottom of the rod. With mold blocks tightly squeezed in handles, or vise, insert the emory laden dowel inside the gas check shank portion of the mold, and make a small, circular motion on the outside rim of the check shank. It took me 3 strips of emory paper to do a custome brass mold this way. I measured each time the emory paper lost its grit. It only took about 10 minutes to do both cavities of the mold. Remember, this was a custome mold that took about a year of impatient waiting on my part, to receive. I didn't want to screw it up! I took my time, and made many meticulous measurements in the process. I even counted the number of revolutions it took to open the shank the proper diameter as a guage for the other cavity. All turned out well, and in a very short time. It is doable, and very simple. Just take your time. It's alot easier to remove metal than replace.

By the way, I called Hornady and expressed my displeasure with them by making the existing gas checks thinner, to save a few pennies. I'm sure my complaint was immediately filed in the circular file, but it did make me feel better. Not as good as the simple solution of enlargening the gas check shank, but better.

                       Jeff

note: iron molds will take a little more work, while aluminum a little less, due to their varying hardness.
 
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