Shooters Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi

where do i start...

i am getting ready to purchase a new rem 750 i was going to go with my tryed and true 30-06 (my fav cal) but while i was looking at it i saw the same rem 750 in a .35 whelen for about 200.00 less so i have been doing alot of research on the whelen and have found its really just a modified 30-06 bullet with alot more weight (correct me if i am wrong) so my questions are

in your guys opion which is better 30-06 or the 35 whelen

i am a white tail hunter and thats pretty much all this gun will be used for

from what i have read most .35 whelen shooters swear by them i just cant figure out why the whelen would be so much less than the 06 is there something i am missing about them ?

i would like to hand load my rounds but i honestly doubt i ever do so if i go with the .35 whelen what would be a great factory game load for deer? (most deer i shoot are 150 yards or less)

and does anybody in here own one of these and can tell me a bit about it

and my last question it totally of the subject but i have wondered about it for a long time i own a 243 with a fixed 4x32 scope and i own a savage 30-06 with a vari 3-9x40 scope i like how the 3-9 and zoom a bit but i when i go hunting with it i leave it on 4 power b/c i dont know if it will mess with where the bullet goes i sighted the rifle with the scope on 4 power so i assume i need to leave it there ????? i shot a deer at 250 yards with it on 4 power and and the deer kinda looked like a dot in the scope after i shot it i turn the scope to 9 power and WOW there was a difference i could have pick a spot on it anywhere and shot it but again i was nervous to mess with the vari powers so i guess what the questions is will turning the scope to 9 power mess with where i want my bullet to go ???

the reason i ask is when i by my new rem 750 i want to know if i should buy a fixed 4x40-4x50 or should i go ahead and buy a 3-9x40--3-9x50

Thank You guys in advanced Thanks Tyler
 

·
The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
Joined
·
23,914 Posts
If you don't handload, you don't want the Whelen. No factory ammo available. Also, the Whelen is noted for more recoil than the 30-06.

On the scope question - if you hunt at ranges less than 300 yds, the fixed power scopes will serve your purpose for less costs than the variables, plus be stronger in construction due to less parts. Most folks buy variables, use the highest power for sighting in and then turn them down to about mid-power for hunting and leave them there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
330 Posts
I do own two 35 whelens, and one 30-06 among others. I also handload but can tell you here in Wisconsin most retailers that sell firearms carry 35 whelen factory loads, along with most gun shops that deal in firearms. 35 factory ammo is easy to get, but you will not find it in multiple bullet weights like the 30-06. Typically 200 or 250 is what you will find. Almost all of the factory ammo on the shelf is load with 200 grain remington bullets and are very effective on whitetails beyond 150yards. I can also tell you that the felt recoil between the 35 whelen factory loads and the 30-06 factory loads is relatively the same. This is from practical application. the 06 I have is in Ruger MKII with a boat paddle synthetic stock and actually kicks like a mule compared to the 35's one in a wood stock the other in a Bell and Carlson.

Most guys that have whelens love them and handloaded can send a 225 - 250 grain bullets into a moose or bear without concern.

In my opinion you are looking at the ultimate whitetail firearm for big north woods bucks. It sounds like a deal if you are comfortable with the firearm.

As far as the scope. Changing you power setting on any modern scope should not affect your point of aim. I have tested many have never seen change from any well made variable. As stated keep it on low power and only turn it up if you have need to and have time then return to low power.


GF
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,246 Posts
If you don't handload, you don't want the Whelen. No factory ammo available. Also, the Whelen is noted for more recoil than the 30-06.

On the scope question - if you hunt at ranges less than 300 yds, the fixed power scopes will serve your purpose for less costs than the variables, plus be stronger in construction due to less parts. Most folks buy variables, use the highest power for sighting in and then turn them down to about mid-power for hunting and leave them there.
I will have to respectfully disagree with both of your responses.

To the OP:

35 Whelen ammunition IS, IN FACT, available from several different companies, including Double Tap, Nosler and Federal. It is quite expensive when compared to 30-'06 ammo, but you should never have any trouble finding it in good quantity, just don't wait until 1 week before season to go looking for it.

Variable scopes are by far the most popular because they allow excellent field of view at low power and a much more precise point of aim, at longer distances. You should have more than 4x on your .243, to take best advantage of its long range capabilities, particularly if you ever use it for varmint hunting. A good practice is to mount a variable scope, site in at the highest power, then shoot a 3-shot group at the lowest power and another at a middle sitting. If there is a significant change in your point of impact, there is a flaw in your scope and it should be worked on or replaced.

Most people who hunt with variable power scopes set them at the lowest power and leave them there, until they are presented with a longer range shot. When a deer is in close there is little time to adjust the power down, but when you see one at distance, there is often plenty of time to dial up the power.

I hope you find this information helpful.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
131 Posts
The only time a scopes POI will change due to magnification issues will be because of parallax, that is when the scope is not properly focused and the recticle will change it's POA when you move your head around the scope. Most 3-9s don't have that issue because of the low magnification and they have a built in parallax adjustment. Parallax ony becomes apparent when you look at scopes with a high magnifaction range usually starting with the 4-14s and going up to the 12-42s. These will all have parallax adjustment knobs though.
 

·
The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
Joined
·
23,914 Posts
Stand corrected on the factory ammo availability - resourced my Hornady catalog and they don't list it.

As to scope magnification, the primary reason the 3x9 is so popular is the average hunter feels it gives more latitude in all hunting conditions. There shouldn't be any argument they are more fragile than a fixed power. Again, when discussing scopes with shooters at the local range, most state the higher power is used for sighting in and when in the field, they are turned down to about mid-power. Saying this, almost all of my scopes is a variable of some sort. My hunting isn't limited to 80 yds and under as the Midwest and Eastern hunters normally find.


A good variable is going to be more expensive than a good mid-power fixed scope.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank You guys i think i am going to go with the .35 whelen and see how i like it i love my 30-06 but my savage just doesent fit me right and it kicks like a mule my fathers 30-06 is a rem 700 bdl and it doesent kick much at all and his rem 7400 30-06 really has no kick but my savage after about 5 ronds starts to bruse my shoulder i think b/c it just doesent sit on my shoulder just right it seems almost to small ohhh my 243 i got when i was 14 it was my frist deer gun and my 1st year finally getting to deer hunt dont use it for varmit hunting just killin deer got me 2 last year so i dont think i need any bigger of a scope on it thanks again and thats for the scope help Tyler
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
i live in kansas its kinda a mix there are alot of timber and ther are alot of wide open feilds i dont want to say i might not try to shoot on out to 4 or 500 yards but the last 10 years i have been hunting the longest shot i have had to take was about 250 yards but most of my shots have been less than 150 yards and after reading all these replys i think im going to go with a nikon pro staff 3-9x40 i think it should work very well with the .35 whelen Thanks Tyler
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,847 Posts
Tyler, I've owned three .35 Whelens over that last decade or so, including a 7400 in .35W. Nice accurate rifle. Ammo is not at all tough to find and the Rem factory 200gr load is an absolute hammer on deer-sized game. In my experience with it, it smacks a deer much harder than even a 180gr '06 load while giving nearly the same MPBR as a typical 30/06 180gr.; 263 yds for the '06 and 254 yds for the factory 200gr .35 Whelen load.

I've shot several deer with a .35W and most have been DIT and none has ever run out of sight. Recoil of the factory 200gr load (especially in the 7400) is about the same to my shoulder as a 180gr '06. There are loads available that even outpace the factory 200gr by about 200 FPS too. I took two nice bucks last year with a Stars and Stripes 200gr TSX last year and one was a DIT at 225 yds (scope was a Nikon Prostaff 2-7x32). The Whelen is an excellent caliber, unappreciated by those who simply see velocity figures and end up missing out on a round that performs very well.
Good Luck!



****** Added; There is a load from Hornady called LM for the .35 Whelen. It's a 200gr spire point interlok bullet at 2810 FPS. I'd be happy to point anyone interested in the right direction for some of them at $35/box.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,248 Posts
I'd totally take the .35 Whelen over the .30-06, in a Rem 750 it won't kick much at all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
242 Posts
I have a 750 carbine in 35 Whelen (also a 7400 and 700CDL in 35 Whelen). It has an 18.5" barrel. I was out target shooting with it today, what a great rifle and caliber. No complaints about it whatsoever.

The rifle is short and pointable, hits hard out to moderate ranges and penetrates well. Reliable and reasonably accurate, it's one of my favourite hunting rifles. It has a Leupold 2.5x scope in keeping with the compact size of this rifle. All that's needed for hunting out to moderate ranges.

Here's a 4 shot group at 100 yards using a rest, and a picture of my rifle. The load used is a 4.0cc Lee dipper and H4895 (54gr) and a Hornady 250 gr RN bullet. Muzzle speed is ~2375 fps. :)



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
599 Posts
I bought a Remington 700 CDL in 35 Whelen this year to tune up for a rifle for Elk next year. I reload so ammo isn't a problem and in fact the gun is really a reloaders dream. That's because the factory ammo is really loaded anemic because of all the older rifles chambered for the round and converted old military rifles chambered for it. I reload mine to published max loads from some older reloading books and I can attain near magnum velocities out of the round. The recoil is stouter then a 30-06 but less then a 338 Win mag. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,790 Posts
If you already own an -06, then the Whelan is a logical addition. It is a fine cartridge, capable of taking bigger game than the -06.

As for scopes changing POI with zoom changes, you better test to be sure. Skylar's explanation is not completely accurate. One of the things that separates bad scopes from good scopes is that good ones can be zoomed without changing POI, but many cheaper scopes will print to different spots if you zoom from one end of the magnification range to the other. It is not just a parallax problem.

The only way to be sure of what your scope does is to test it. It is a simple test, and will solve all the insecurities you have, or else it will confirm you really have a fixed power scope that needs to be used at the power used when it was sighted in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,246 Posts
If you ever do decide to load your own ammo (it's not that hard and a very enjoyable hobby, especially since it encourages you to "shoot more, and shoot more often") you should check out this exhaustive study of 35 caliber bullets, as fired from a 35 Remington. The Whelen is going to give 200-400fps more than the Remington, generally, but this is still some very good information on what bullets you have to choose from and what you might expect from the, in terminal performance.

http://www.marlinowners.com/forums/index.php/topic,7180.0.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,847 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
The only time a scopes POI will change due to magnification issues will be because of parallax, that is when the scope is not properly focused and the recticle will change it's POA when you move your head around the scope. Most 3-9s don't have that issue because of the low magnification and they have a built in parallax adjustment. Parallax ony becomes apparent when you look at scopes with a high magnifaction range usually starting with the 4-14s and going up to the 12-42s. These will all have parallax adjustment knobs though.
sorry,but your statement that poi will only change due to parrallax is not correct.--eg -i can use a $3000 0r so kahles scope,and a $100 dollar chinese piece of junk and set the parralax on both,the kahles will hold zero,but the chinese scope will shift all over the target,due primarily to VERY poor workmanship in holding machinning tolerances to iso stds or anything close to it.-dismantle a chinese copy of a 6.5-20 leupold and you will see why they shift poi and wont return to zero.--some of these chinese scopes,should not be allowed to be sold outside china.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,749 Posts
I have a 35 Whelen in a model 700 Classic and would recommend the big 35 to anyone wanting a gun capable of killing ANYTHING in N.A. and most of Africa.

I load the 200 grain Hornady RN for deer at 2700FPS and get less meat damage than most '06 loads while killing deer stone dead.

I also can load 250 grain Speer SP bullets to 2525 fps. That load is capable of killing elk and moose out to 400 yds, so don't ever think the Whelen is just a medium range cartridge.

I keep looking a a nice 750 carbine in 35Whelen at local shop, but $700 isn't in the budget right now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,847 Posts
I have a 35 Whelen in a model 700 Classic and would recommend the big 35 to anyone wanting a gun capable of killing ANYTHING in N.A. and most of Africa.

I load the 200 grain Hornady RN for deer at 2700FPS and get less meat damage than most '06 loads while killing deer stone dead.

I also can load 250 grain Speer SP bullets to 2525 fps. That load is capable of killing elk and moose out to 400 yds, so don't ever think the Whelen is just a medium range cartridge.

I keep looking a a nice 750 carbine in 35Whelen at local shop, but $700 isn't in the budget right now.
My experience mirrors yours as well. How's this for a good price on a 750 carbine in .35W ??

http://www.gunsamerica.com/94533345...mington_750_Woodsmaster_Carbine_35_Whelen.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,749 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
131 Posts
Oops my bad. I was talking about scopes of good to excellent quality. Scopes from the basic Nikon to the top of the line Schmidt and Bender. Not tascos by any means. Crap forgot something else. A big thing is whether it's Front Focal Plane or Second Focal Plane. A SFP will change, unless parallax is adjusted for, with magnification. That's not always true and sometimes the change is very small. A FFP is designed around the basis of having the same ranging ability (mil formulas) at all magnifcation levels and won't change with magnification.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top