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Discussion Starter #1
Have been reloading for a while but now want to cast 9 and 40 bullets, need a list of
things to start with, i looked and was thinking about
Lee Pro 4 20 Lb Furnace 110 Volt
Frankford Arsenal CleanCast Lead Fluxing Compound 1 lb
Lyman 4-Cavity Ingot Mold with Handle
Lee 2-Cavity Bullet Mold
a stainless spoon
i have plenty of wheel weights
I know the list can go on forever but any corrections on the list i have and add ons would
be nice
I have a rcbs press will lee sizer die fit it?
 

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You don't need the fluxing compound, i use stick bullet lube or wax for flux as do most folks i know. The lee sizer will fit your rcbs press.
 

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Piney Woods Moderator
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Welcome to the forum. You are missing a couple of important items, leather gloves and safety glasses. Casting is a lot of fun but can be hazardous if you make a mistake. Keep all water and fluids away from your melting pots. (don't drink and cast) One drop of water in a pot will cause an erruption you would not believe.
The Lee sizer will fit any standard reloading press and is what I use. Good luck with getting started.
 

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Welcome to the forum.

In case you didn't get the hint, you probably need a means of sizing bullets (they can come out of the mold too large, but if they don't, you can shoot them as-molded), and also need a means of lubricating them. If you want to fill the grease grooves, you need a tool called a sizer and lubricator, or lubri-sizer, for short. It is a special press with interchangeable dies that swages the cast bullets into the die to adjust their diameter, then fills the grooves with pressurized lube. It's the old way. Lee's introduction of tumble lube bullet designs brought their Liquid Alox lube along with it, which you simply drizzle over the bullets, then roll them around until they are coated and you are done. It turns out that at pistol velocities that works fine for about all bullets, whether they are the Lee Micro Band design or have normal lube grooves.

The drawbacks to Lee Liquid Alox? They only make 4 oz bottles and those cost $4.50 at most online dealers. For $10.50 you can get a whole quart at White Label lube, under their Xlox brand name. Just remember it's only for lubricating bullets, despite the name's similarity to a certain over-the-counter laxative. And, only for lubing bullets also because the Liquid Alox lubes leave a varnish behind that carbonizes when they burn, so you can't use them for bullet melt flux or for lubing the moving parts on your bullet mold, as you can a stick lube for conventional lubri-sizers.

Lee's sizers are inexpensive, costing less than the dies for a standard lubri-sizer do. You need a separate one for each diameter you want to size to. As described, they fit in a standard single stage loading press. They have a ram that replaces the standard snap-in shell holder and that pushes bullets up through the die and captures them on the other side by using their plastic packaging box as a container.

On the furnace, the Lee is least expensive, but it also has the least precise temperature control. On the one I have, I substituted my own design thermocouple controller long ago. I also bought an RCBS furnace before coming up with the controller, so I have two, and, frankly, the RCBS does pretty well with its built-in thermostat. The Lee used to swing 50 degrees off the setting for me. I like the RCBS better, but it does cost more.

Incidentally, I don't know how you chose your bullets, but the Lee Tumble Lube designs have proven very accurate for me, and have not needed to be sized at all. They have fit my guns as-cast. The .358 Wadcutter version cut my K-frame Smith's groups in half over commercial match loads.

You may want to buy some lead-free plumbing solder? Wheel weights work OK, but I find adding about 2% by weight of tin helps mold fill and appearance. Lead free plumbing solder is about 95% tin, so I use that rather than pure tin. I wait for it to come on sale and stock up. The only caveat is that there have been lead-free solders made with zinc in them. Zinc can spoil mold filling. I've never seen zinc in plumbing solder. Just electrical solder. But before you buy a certain brand, check the MSDS on line for zinc. Plumbing solder has to wick into a tight space well, which, like good mold fill, cannot be done if surface tension is too high. So I don't expect to find zinc in it, but thought I should put the warning out there.
 

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Welcome to the forum from New Jersey. Uncle Nick layed it
out for you. Ain't much I could do better. I would just suggest
you might go to the lyman website. They are pioneers in the
cast bullet business. Take a look at their some of their goodies.

Zeke
 
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