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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought one of the Teslong bore scopes off Amazon. I got the model that just plugs into your computer or phone, it only cost ... around $70ish.

BUT, now I have scared myself. I looked inside 2 barrels, so I could use some advice. There have been several posts on here commenting about just how crude the inside of a barrel looks to the newbie. Yup, it shore do!!!!

So give me some advice on just how bad this is. This is a new, never fired, .30 cal 1:10 twist barrel I just bought. A few days ago I thought I should run a few patches though it w/ JB Bore paste in preparation for it's first firing. I felt a few places where I thought it might be a bit rough, so when I got my bore scope today of couse I had to use it. What do you think?
 

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I hope it shoots good because it looks bad.
It's hard to tell relief sometimes. Is that a cut rifled barrel with wide lands? You'll have to shoot it to see how it does. Expect some fouling.
 

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Like JBelk says just shoot it .. I have a rifle I bought new and have been shooting for years and it came with what looks like a rust spot on one side of the barrel that now looks like a hole .. but shoots just as good as any rifle I've got. .
 

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Looks like you bought a barrel from Savage...🤣🤣

Just shoot it before you do anything else. Many times some ugly stuff will shoot fine enough.

Cheers
 

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Those pictures are MUCH better than I get from my Lyman scope. I'm impressed.

Here's a Lothar-Walther Fireball barrel with almost 6k rounds through it. Comparing pictures more than barrels, yours is much better.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yesterday I recieved my new Teslong borescope. Ordered it from Amazon Sunday night. Think I paid just $70ish for just the scope & mirrors. It uses either my phone or a computer USB port as the recording device, no seperate monitor required. All good.

Used it it last night to look at a new .30 cal. barrel, never fired, stroked maybe 50 times with JB Bore cleaning compound last week. Using the JB I felt some unexpected spots of resistance & tore holes in the first patch thru.

Is this bore actually horrible or am I falling into the beginning bore scopers trap of (paraphrasing from other previous post) "OMG it looks like it was made with chisels" thing?

If it is "bad", can it be fixed by lapping it by hand? It is a barrel with a gas port if that affects the answer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
More pix. This is the first time I uploaded pix, not at all sure the first 4 pix are the .30, I also scoped a .22 used barrel & am not sure I used the correct files since I couldn't really see the pix till I posted above. This set I selected using a different path/method.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Moderators. I made a mistake. I didn't think this post made it to the board because I couldn't find it after I posted it last night.

So. I started a new thread today. Sorry, didn't mean to double post.

Can you please combine these two threads?

Again, I'm sorry for my inexperience with posting & my mistake & the extra work I caused you!
 

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The target will tell you what you need to know about the overall performance of the barrel. I've got a Teslong as well, and used it on a brand new Savage barrel before any shots except what the factory did for QC. Looked like a railroad track, chatter marks, tool marks, etc. looked like it would not shoot at all. Shoots .5" groups with handloads if I do my part at 100y. I've got a X caliber barrel in 20P, it has a small depression/low spot straight from the factory, (before any shots firec by me) on one of the lands. still shoots better than I'm capable of.

The scope is a good tool, but don't over react when you see what the bore looks like. Let the target tell you what to do. GL
 

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That looks like the normal collection of powder and minor copper fouling until you got to the one rifled by barbedwire. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Nope. Can't be. Unless the manufacturer shot it. But it was bought as a part, not assembled. So I figure probably not ever fired.

These are a portion of the other post from last night. I made a mistake thinking the first post somehow got lost, but the didn't, must be some delay & I just went straight to posting this morning before I looked for last night's. My bad!

Still think I should shoot it. Or just take it back?
 

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If all those pictures are of the same barrel, I'd return it. The first several pics are of a button rifled barrel. The ditches and gouges seen at the last is of a galled button imitating a dull cutter.
Notice you can see the direction of the tool by the swarf left hanging. If that tool direction is opposite the bullet direction, it is nothing but a tomato stake.

Here's a pic to illustrate--
Between the big ovals is a 'ditch' or a 'land', its hard to tell without being there, but in any case, the small 'hatch marks' seen in all there ovals are reamer artifacts. Why are they seen in all three places with grooves cut deeper? Button rifled barrel do show reamer artifacts in lands and grooves because they're 'ironed in' by the process. This picture shows the 'iron' had a goober on it (or broke) and cut ditches in what's supposed to be smooth.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Moderators. I made a mistake. I didn't think this post made it to the board because I couldn't find it after I posted it last night.

So. I started a new thread today. Sorry, didn't mean to double post.

Can you please combine these two threads?
No worries, we got you. 👍
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Darkker, Thank you!

Belk, in the pic you marked up, the slightly lighter area to the right (out of focus) of the round image is the mirror holder. The bore scope was inserted from the muzzle end. That means the left side is toward the chamber, the right side toward the muzzle.

The smoother areas with the reamer marks under your larger ovals are the lands. The really ugly part under the small oval in the middle is a groove. All the pictures are this way, L-R is chamber to muzzle. Looking at the artifacts left from the button, and reading your posts, I am (slightly educated) guessing the button was beaking down on the proud corners of the groove forming fins. Is that reamer marks on the thin strip down the center of the groove? A few of the pictures show "triangle" tears at the corners that are ... hard to figure out the right words.... larger on the left, smaller on the right. Really hard for me to make a judgement from the swirly patterns! That makes me think the botton moved right to left. Muzzle to chamber. Like you said.

Junk. Darn it!!!! :mad::devilish:

Oh, by the way, the Teslong focuses by threading the mirror closer or farther from the camera (axial to the bore). I have never seen another borescope so I don't know how they focus. The camera rod is .2" diameter, so focus is a bit dependent on how you hold the mirror wrt the bore, radially. Bigger the bore, the more slop/clearance, the more critical the side load you put on the rod.

I have several books (& lots of experience) about how to diagnose rolling bearing failures. I think it would be GREAT if someone would put together at least a "white paper" on how to diagnose borescope pictures with lots of pictures. Eh Belk?.
 

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My
Teslong Industrial Endoscope
arrived a few minutes ago.
It does a great job of looking at chambers, but my bore images are not as good as the above.
I could not see much in a Bartlein 260 or PacNor 270, but the .357 bore was a better view.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
You can loosen the lil lock ring that holds the mirror in place, & thread the mirror in & out to get better focus at a given bore size. I found it hit or miss, sorta Kentucky Windage like. Like I said I've never seen another borescope (endoscope) but this one has a fixed focal length, so adjusting the mirror is the only way to improve focus.

I would bet the really expensive ones allow you to change focus from the operator end.

On reflection I guess this isn't the first endoscope I've seen. There was this Urologist once...... another story.
 

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The really expensive ones go in the bore or part and 'look around' like a preying mantis by way of a joystick. It's downright amazing. The 3mm probe can turn 120 degrees in any direction with focus and light controls and recording full motion video or stills. The ones I've seen used are made by Canon.
 

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Back in the 70s I used my company's optical borescope to inspect various barrels. Most rifled bores look rather rough when compared to a hydraulic cylinder bore but shoot well.

The worst I found was a 1903 Springfield barrel. Forward of the throat the rifling was simply gone and the bore looked like dried mud. Chronograph velocities were a couple hundred feet per second less than published values. Accuracy was OK by military standards; I could hit a pizza box at 100 yards. I came to the less than amazing conclusion that the barrel was worn out and bought a military surplus replacement.

I ran the new barrel through the vapor degreaser then inspected the bore. There were still lots of tooling chatter but the new barrel had rifling where the old barrel had none. Velocities increased to published values and accuracy was on the order of 4 to 6 inch groups with military ammo. Handloads brought this down to 1.5 to 2 inch groups. I thought this was pretty good for a World War 1 era military rifle.
 

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I've been using a Teslong (either a fellow students or mine) for about 6 months. The price and fragility of the rigid versions discouraged me from getting too practiced with it. The Teslong is a real eye opener. Carbon, copper fouling, corrosion can't hide. It's handy enough to take along when contemplating a new purchase. It's too valuable and too inexpensive to not have one.
 
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