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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There is quite a supply of spare parts available to fix many of the mechanical problems in the old H&R revolvers, like replacing the plastic yoked mainspring rod, cylinder lever spring, sear, trigger spring, etc., but unfortunately the parts you are looking for will be difficult to find & if you do they may not be as good as what you have. Like others have said, you would probably be better off selling yours as a parts gun & using that money to buy one in good condition. 999's in excellent to good condition are for sale by the hundreds on line. I have a dozen H&R's from the 40's, 50's, & 60's and other than the plastic yoke main spring issue in the 60's all have performed flawlessly. They made a decent "workingman's" gun that was affordable. The 999 was their top of the line, so if it has been shot to the point it has the wear problems you describe, it's time to retire it.
Just joined, so I am not sure how to do this.
I recently bought a H & R Sportsman in very good condition made in 1947.. Appears to have not been fired, or fired very little. Upon receipt, I fired 9 rounds with no problems. A few weeks later I fired 2 or 3 rounds and it locked up..Really out of time!. Cannot cock hammer, or pull trigger. The cylinder lock is not going into the notches on the cylinder. I cleaned and oiled but problem remains. Any suggestions will be welcomed. Don
 

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The weak link in all H&R revolvers is the DA sear and the hand spring. They take slave pins to reassemble and generally not worth a gunsmiths' time to mess with them unless he really wants to. (50 years ago, no shop in my hometown would work on them. One guy 90 miles away worked on nothing but old H&R, I&J, S&W revolvers and had ALL the parts. He got ALL the business...thankfully.)
Parts were the hold-up many years ago but maybe that's changed.
 

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The local gunshop has a couple of triple 9's hanging on their barnwood wall inside with other relics, makes a nice display, just say'in.
 

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My wife of long ago did a shadow box display of a Monopoly set and an old owl head revolver with an empty packet of KoolAide mix and a candy cigarette.
Somebody paid her outrageous money for it.
I thought it was too dumb to try to sell all the way until it sold. Gulp. :eek:
Even a rusty old gun that wasn't any good when new, is worth more now as decoration.
 

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Just joined, so I am not sure how to do this.
I recently bought a H & R Sportsman in very good condition made in 1947.. Appears to have not been fired, or fired very little. Upon receipt, I fired 9 rounds with no problems. A few weeks later I fired 2 or 3 rounds and it locked up..Really out of time!. Cannot cock hammer, or pull trigger. The cylinder lock is not going into the notches on the cylinder. I cleaned and oiled but problem remains. Any suggestions will be welcomed. Don
You will need to take it apart to identify your problem, which sounds like the plastic tip on your mainspring assembly has broken. These plastic tipped assemblies were made in the late 60's to early 70's & failed due the the plastic deteriorating from age. Jack First Gun Parts in Rapid City, S.D. has metal tipped replacements. Take the grips off and look to see if that is the issue. If that's what it is, it's an easy fix. If you have something amiss in the internals in the frame, they can be tricky to get back together if you can find the parts. Like others have said, you will need about three slave pins to hold the guts together while installing. I've done it so many times it's second nature to me, but for the rookie without knowledge or the right tools it can be nearly impossible. All the working parts are held in the frame by 3 pins. Hope this helps. Good luck!
 

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You will need to take it apart to identify your problem, which sounds like the plastic tip on your mainspring assembly has broken. These plastic tipped assemblies were made in the late 60's to early 70's & failed due the the plastic deteriorating from age. Jack First Gun Parts in Rapid City, S.D. has metal tipped replacements. Take the grips off and look to see if that is the issue. If that's what it is, it's an easy fix. If you have something amiss in the internals in the frame, they can be tricky to get back together if you can find the parts. Like others have said, you will need about three slave pins to hold the guts together while installing. I've done it so many times it's second nature to me, but for the rookie without knowledge or the right tools it can be nearly impossible. All the working parts are held in the frame by 3 pins. Hope this helps. Good luck!
I repaired one a year ago but the replacement i bought was also a plastic tipped one. I made up a simple tool out of a 4 in. length of copper tubing and filed a V notch in it to compress the spring while inserting the pin. I tossed it in the scrap box because it was so easy to make and the chance of ever needing it again??
It wasn't my gun, but I thought making a metal one would have been the way to go if it was mine.
Gregor
CGVS
 

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Been some years, but I self-learned on cheap/not working H&R’s. The basic lock work got used on a lot of them, including the cheap pull pins (even cheaper if they were broken) on up to their top-of-the line 999’s.





What’s simpler than a pull-pin H&R...or cheaper to buy if broken?





Solid frame, no side plate, mostly held in with pins. No complaints about the steel construction. The lock work pretty much dates back to the 1890’s. Larger on the 999, but it’s a whole lot like the old H&R Permier.

Bob is right about lock work...it’s usually the hand spring. How bad it screws up depends on where the broken off spring part ends up. One test, were it’s not jamming up while cocking the hammer, was to simply point it down. Usually the springless hand will still rotate the cylinder. Pointed up, the hand won’t rotate the cylinder.

But if the broken spring happens to move away from the hand to jam the lock work, are no easy tests.

Got good at getting the crimped in little broken hand spring “stub” out, making new spring, and putting it back into the hand.

Didn’t notice the sear wear...lBob’s likely right about that too, but they aren’t the type of revolver to get a whole lot of DA use, so I never really noticed. SA sear seemed to last as long as you didn’t stone away the surface hardness.

They did go to a plastic tip (or stirrup) to connect the mainspring strut to the hammer. Plastic tends to break with age/use. When I couldn’t buy a metal one, had to make one. I’d just make a metal stirrup, then silver solder that to the old main spring strut

BUT..the few true gunsmiths left (rather than part’s changers) will NOT want to work on it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Been some years, but I self-learned on cheap/not working H&R’s. The basic lock work got used on a lot of them, including the cheap pull pins (even cheaper if they were broken) on up to their top-of-the line 999’s.





What’s simpler than a pull-pin H&R...or cheaper to buy if broken?





Solid frame, no side plate, mostly held in with pins. No complaints about the steel construction. The lock work pretty much dates back to the 1890’s. Larger on the 999, but it’s a whole lot like the old H&R Permier.

Bob is right about lock work...it’s usually the hand spring. How bad it screws up depends on where the broken off spring part ends up. One test, were it’s not jamming up while cocking the hammer, was to simply point it down. Usually the springless hand will still rotate the cylinder. Pointed up, the hand won’t rotate the cylinder.

But if the broken spring happens to move away from the hand to jam the lock work, are no easy tests.

Got good at getting the crimped in little broken hand spring “stub” out, making new spring, and putting it back into the hand.

Didn’t notice the sear wear...lBob’s likely right about that too, but they aren’t the type of revolver to get a whole lot of DA use, so I never really noticed. SA sear seemed to last as long as you didn’t stone away the surface hardness.

They did go to a plastic tip (or stirrup) to connect the mainspring strut to the hammer. Plastic tends to break with age/use. When I couldn’t buy a metal one, had to make one. I’d just make a metal stirrup, then silver solder that to the old main spring strut

BUT..the few true gunsmiths left (rather than part’s changers) will NOT want to work on it.

Well I guess I was lucky. No broken parts and no plastic. Guns made in 1947, pre-999, do not have plastics, at least this one does not. Replaced most of springs and that seems to have fixed the problem ( gun had some old dried up cosmoline in hard to get to places,) Thanks to everyone who offered suggestions .drbj210
 
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