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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I have been reading on here and all over the internet on varmint rifles and the reviews they have received but thought it would be best to ask those who shoot. I am looking at buying a 22-250 but there are so many to choose from. 2 companies that keep coming up are remington and savage. Then there are so many different styles. the SPS varmint, varmint SF, VTR, and the 12 Savage line VLP, LRPV, FVSS. Any one have any suggestions as to a great gun to buy? Any opinions on other brands are welcome as well.
I do not plan on doing any customizing to the rifle, just looking for a great shooter as is.

Thank you in advance
 

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I have a Savage model 112 22-250.Laminate stock(heavy)-gun weighs about 12 lbs with 4x14.5 scope.A tack driver on paper-have not had a chance to shoot prairie dogs as yet.I would buy again,in fact have a model 112 in 300 win mag-shot same hole when setting scope at 25 yards.Good guns.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Don't really have a set price, but I'm not looking to get too carried away. Just looking at guns online I'm thinking I am going to spend close to 1000 bucks for a decent rifle regardless. I look at it this way, spend the money once on a good quality item and if well taken care of, it should last a life time or 2.
 

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im ruger biased but when you come to varmiting,you should have a look at sako.on the other end of the scale is marlin, which i have been told are very accurate at a budget price.my advice is buy the best you can afford,and save up for a good scope. good luck and hope you enjoy your 250.
 

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I have a Rem 700 SPS, plain-jane composite stock, 24" barrel, in 243 Win. It's my go-to varmint rifle for its accuracy and utility, not worrying about scratching the stock. I put a Burris 4-12x Laserscope on it, and that combo works great. It works great for ground squirrels to coyotes, with rockchucks the preferred varmint. Prior to this, I used a Win Mod 70 in 25-06, and a Rem 700 in 17 Rem. Both still get used, but not as much as the 243. The SPS is a great value.

I prefer a sporter-weight barrel to heavy varmint barrels as I hike around quite a bit with it, but this depends on what type of shooting you want to do. If shooting prairie dog towns sitting in one spot, a heavy varmint barrel may work better. The 22-250 will work for everything including coyotes.
 

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What distances are you talking about shooting? I reckon a 223 would be hard to beat for economy and its got to be up there are a varminter. Easy on barrels, easy on the pocket, easy on the shoulder and a lot of fun to boot

I'd go with GunHo as far as Sako goes. I've got a Sako 75 Varmint in 308 and it's fantastic. If you can get one in 223 you'd be very happy with it I'm sure. I wouldn't go near a 85 model, but if you can get one in the 75 model, I would seriously look at getting one.
 

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well, if I had to do it all over again......

It would be Ruger all the way....they work, they are relatively affordable, and they have many diff calibers and configurations.... one thing I particularly like is the available laminated stocks, I detest plastic stocks....as far as caliber goes, first would be a Hornet, then a .223 .... have had all the rest, and those two will do anything you need to do with less recoil, less whoom and blast, and less COST, except at extremely long ranges .... JMO
 

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Both Remington & Savage make a good product. I had the model 12 FLV in the 204 scary accurate but I needed a wagon to transport it. My nephew bought the same rifle in the 223 and again great shooter. I sold my Savage and purchase a CZ 527 American. It is a lot lighter and is just as good a shooter but almost twice the money.
If you are not going to be walking lots I would say Savage is the best bang for your dollar:)
 

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I tend to think of varmint hunting in 3 catagories.

#1. Whole lot of targets. traditional p-dog, ground squirrel, type hunting where there ae a whole lot of targets being offered all at once. You tend to shoot a whole bunch fast. Here I like the small cased .224's, like the .223 (but if you've a good 222 or .222mag. around the house, use it).

#2. Fewer-rather targets. the little bit of ground hog and crow hunting done, never needed a whole lot of shots all at once. Crows just don't hang around, and ground hogs don't together live in large populations. I'm less worried about burning out the barrel, and the shots can be long. Like the 22-250/220swift in .224's (and if you've an accurate enough 6mm, wouldn't be a bad choice).

#3. Big critters. I've never seen or heard of anyone having so many Coyote shots in an hour that there barrel got over heated. Can pretty well use whatever caliber you have that shoots well enough. Sporter weight guns work just about as well as varmint weight. One of the few good uses (besides targets and playing sniper) for a .308 varmint weight.
 

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varmiting

I tend to think of varmint hunting in 3 catagories.

#1. Whole lot of targets. traditional p-dog, ground squirrel, type hunting where there ae a whole lot of targets being offered all at once. You tend to shoot a whole bunch fast. Here I like the small cased .224's, like the .223 (but if you've a good 222 or .222mag. around the house, use it).

#2. Fewer-rather targets. the little bit of ground hog and crow hunting done, never needed a whole lot of shots all at once. Crows just don't hang around, and ground hogs don't together live in large populations. I'm less worried about burning out the barrel, and the shots can be long. Like the 22-250/220swift in .224's (and if you've an accurate enough 6mm, wouldn't be a bad choice).

#3. Big critters. I've never seen or heard of anyone having so many Coyote shots in an hour that there barrel got over heated. Can pretty well use whatever caliber you have that shoots well enough. Sporter weight guns work just about as well as varmint weight. One of the few good uses (besides targets and playing sniper) for a .308 varmint weight.
i think ribbonstones pretty much on the money with that combo
 

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If I already didn't have several varmint guns and was just starting out, I would consider the one in an add by Dick's Sporting Goods. Remington in Mossy Oak stock, 700 Varmint, includes 4-12x40 scope, $449.
 

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I bought my savage 12fv (with a scope) at Dick's on sale a few years ago. It was 432 dollars (after taxes.) 1/2-3/4 groups are no big deal and it has made one holers.
 

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Another vote for Ribbonstones opinion in post #11


I'd look at a Savage. Many rifles shoot good, but Savages seem to have the edge for consistanly doing well out of the box.
 

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Since you said you want a "forever" rifle, and are willing to spend a grand: how about another 300 bucks and get a Cooper. I picked one up last winter, a Model 21 Varminter (.204 Ruger) with the plain wood stock and 26" barrel for $1100 on sale. Showed one-hole test target with handloaded 32 gr. Hornadys; so far with factory 39-40gr. ammo while still breaking it in am getting no worse than 1/2 moa @ 100 yds. Only drawback for some might be that it's single-shot. Great personalized factory service, too. Would keep this rifle over my .22-250 and beloved shorter-range .221 Fireball if could have only one.
Also, FWIW: Cabela's this month, for another week or so, is selling their special stainless SPS Varmints for $540. These are a bargain; I have one and it's a keeper, maybe a tad heavy but still lighter than most hvy. barrel Savages if that's an issue. One can always add a better stock and trigger later if desired.
Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Are you planning to use a bi-pod on a regular basis, or shoot off-hand most often?

Most of the shooting will be done off-hand but the wolf population is really growing so I am going to start hunting wolves and will be using a bi-pod for that.

The single shot would be a drawback, and I am Canadian so the great deals that Cabelas offers on firearms are unfortunately not available for me. Us Canucks are no longer allowed to buy rifles across the border. Without a doubt our loss....
 
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