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Beartooth Regular
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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
     I've posted a couple of comments about this gun and I've been working with it trying to learn it's peculiarities. The last time I took the gun out I used handloads with Speer 158gr JSP's and AA#5 and I got good accuracy finally, with one group reaching the magic 1" at 25 yds! So the gun will shoot. BUT, I really want to use cast bullets and so far my results with cast have been pretty mediocre using three different bullets ranging from soft cowboy type to Lyman #2 alloy to very hard Laser Cast bullets. Slugging the bore only showed me that the bore is SLIGHTLY smaller than the chamber throats - the slug will just push through each chamber. All the cast bullets I've tried are sized nominal .358 and they won't push through the throats with finger pressure.
     I'm wondering if it's worthwhile to lap this gun with the throats as tight as they are. And I'm reluctant to hone the throats. If you've been reading about DOK's misadventures let me put it this way -  sometimes I make DOK look like the Norm Abrams of gunsmithing! (Hope you all watch New Yankee Workshop&#33<!--emo&;)--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=';)'><!--endemo-->.
     I've lapped several guns and I'm not intimidated by that project, I just don't know if it'd be the optimum thing to do with the throats and bore so closely matched. Any thoughts?
     Also, this gun has a very heavy trigger pull, especially in DA. I didn't realize how heavy it was til I was foolish enough to shoot a 40 yr old Colt Detective Special the other day at the range - never ever EVER shoot a gun that is better than your own! But anyway, is there a way to lighten that pull without reducing reliability? I've already had a few misfires with this gun.

As always, thanks gentlemen!!            IDShooter
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Throats definitely sound too tight to me.

You might be able to send just the cylinder off to a gunsmith (save all the hassle and BS of shipping a complete handgun) to get the throats opened up a little.

Personally I'd use the split rod w/sandpaper in the drill press method on the throats, but that's a choice you'll have to make.

Then I'd fire-lap the snot out of it, and see if that helps.
 

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I am pretty sure you can get springs for the ruger gp stuff.  I play on thefiringline.com and they have a revolver section.  A search for gp100 and maybe the smaller 101 might help.

I know what you mean about shooting other stuff.  I decided to just stay with ruger and have a 100 and 101 in stainless with around 3 inch barrels.  Staying with ruger into the 44 mag series as well.

Some of the springs can lead to less pressure when the hammer falls on the transfer bar, so research will help.  I have decided to leave things stock for now.  I do not shoot custom stuff or even sweet older stuff as I know I will want to improve the rugers.  And they are not always the easiest to improve while keeping reliability.  They do improve with age though.  And I also get used to em.  <!--emo&:)--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/smile.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=':)'><!--endemo-->
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Oh yeah, I forgot, on a double-action revolver (except Redhawks), you can generally lighten the trigger return spring (not mainspring) quite a bit without reducing reliability.  That can change the DA pull a LOT.  I've also just cut a few coils off the trigger return spring... but I know how you feel about doing home gunsmithing for yourself!

Get a spring kit from Brownell's.  It will have both, but you can put in just the trigger return or try various combinations to see what feels best without becoming unreliable.

Oops, one more thing.  Polish the hammer strut (part that the mainspring pushes into the back of the hammer) with some 400 grit sandpaper.  The little knob that fits into the back of the hammer can have burrs and that will make your DA pull very rough.  When you get done polishing put just a dab of grease up in the dimple.  Sometimes this does amazing things for a DA trigger pull.



<!--EDIT|MikeG|May 13 2002,21:24-->
 

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Beartooth Regular
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys. I saw the spring kit in Brownell's, I was wondering how much effect the trigger spring alone would have. It sounds like that's certainly worth a try. And I'll try polishing the hammer strut too.
    I tried lapping this rascal (see post in general discussion) but the throats are just too tight for it to be very effective. I did see some polishing of the bore, but the slug I pushed through the bore still won't drop through the cylinders without a hearty push. I think it's time for that split rod and emory cloth. I just need to find the rod somewhere.

Thanks again,  IDShooter
 

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Beartooth Regular
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Discussion Starter #6
Hi,
   I took the GP out again today to lap it a little after opening up the throats for cast bullets. I got some improvement with the cast bullets, so we're headed in the right direction there.
    But I had another new "weird thing" happen. Every few shots the hammer would hang up about 1/3 of the way down! It then took a much heavier pull on the trigger to get it to drop the rest of the way. Very disconcerting!
     I took it by the gunshop; he said that he has seen that before with the GP's. Usually a bit of lubrication and wear will clear it up I was told. It has been lubricated now, and we'll see what happens. It seems the spot where it hangs up is just about where the hammer would fall if you are shooting DA. Makes me wonder if this isn't related to the apparent bind-up and the misfires I had before. I hope this things breaks in soon. I find I shoot it much better offhand than my SBH and I would sure like it to be as reliable.
    I'll keep you posted (whether you want me to or not! I think my wife is tired of hearing about it....  ).        See ya,    IDShooter
 

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ID,
  As far as the hammer sticking partially on return when shooting, disassemble your gun again, down to removing the hammer. Now take some of your 320 grit emory paper and wrap it around a popsicle stick or tongue depressor(we know everyone keeps these around the house <!--emo&:D--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/biggrin.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=':D'><!--endemo-->). Now polish the inner channel of the frame that the hammer travels thru. There are probably some small burrs there. Then make sure all grit is removed, to prevent further binding. This should slick up your hammer travel problem.(Look on the sides of the hammer now and see if there are signs of rubbing against the frame. If there are, the inside polishing trick should correct it).

                          Jeff
 

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All my ruger revolvers, 4 so far, have the scratches on the hammer from interference.  I have heard the popsicle stick trick, and on the firing line I think someone shimmed their hammer over.  All mine mark on the left side of the hammer if you are holding the gun like you would to shoot a target that is not you.  All mine have some play and I will eventually do the sanding thing.  But mine are reliable and the scratches are not getting worse, makes me figure you got a pretty bad one.

Welcome to non custom stuff I guess.  I like ruger's simple design and I do not mind taking em all the way apart, just don't need to.  For yours though, I would as a non-dependable gun sucks.
 

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Beartooth Regular
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Discussion Starter #9
Well, I went to the range this morning and I had another misfire (lightly dented primer) and mediocre groups with cast again.
     I decided I've put all the time and money into this gun that I'm going to. It's going out the door. I'm just not sure whether to trade or sell it. I'll have to think about that because I have a lot of different ideas I'd like to pursue. But right now I'm feeling a little sour on the whole thing so I'm just going to ponder awhile.
     I just got the dies and I've got about 800-1000 assorted bullets for the thing and 250 pieces of brass so I've got to consider what to do with all that stuff too. You never get your money back out of it.
     My very last Ruger. Absolutely, no if's and or buts.                            IDShooter
 

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ID,
Thats really a shame. Out of all the Rugers i own,(over 12) the only one that i traded in was a .357 Blackhawk. I could never learn to like it's over-all weight and mushy trigger. Mostly it was the weight issue that kept me from having the trigger pull lightened and tightened up. Considering the shabby repair job that was done on your revolver, Ruger doesn't deserve you as a customer! There simply is no excuse for dings, scratches and what-not, not to mention not even fixing the problem.

Scott
 

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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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IDShooter,

I just want you to know that I'm doing my part by staying as far away as possible. I even hesitated to make this post for fear that the DOK virus would travel via the connecting ethers!

Dan
 

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Beartooth Regular
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ID,
I agree with Scott, it is a shame and Ruger should have made this right for you.  Ruger does offer some fine products, but they should 'fess up when the bad apple slips by.  I cannot blame you, I went through a similar thing with Remington about 15 years ago and immediately purged my collection of anything with the Remington name.  I haven't bought one since and won't in the future.  It wasn't that Remington's fix(es) weren't up to snuff, it was their rude customer service from their custom shop that built my brick wall.  I can forgive a lot of things, shoot I can forgive stupidity (albeit grudgingly) but cannot and will not tolerate rudeness, and should not have to.  I'm very disappointed that Ruger did not treat this situation more tactfully and responsibly.  Don't they realize they are losing a potential buyer of not just one firearm but several?  To save the cost of one fix, they lost the potential for a half dozen or more sales.  That's not good economics.

I do enjoy the Rugers I have and all shoot wonderfully, it is a shame...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
You know Alyeska, I can't really say that they were RUDE to me. And they did put a new barrel on which was smoother than the old one, with no reamer marks. But now the hammer hangs up and it doesn't go off every time. And it doesn't shoot cast bullets very well. This gun and I just have bad Kharma I think!
    As for swearing off Rugers, it's just that every Ruger that I've gotten in the last ten years has had something wrong with it, with the exception of my SBH. We're talking about six guns here if my memory is correct. I'm glad that yours shoot well, and I know a lot of people are happy with their products. But I'm not one of them. Heck, I've got an iron sighted Marlin 30-30 that cost me $200 that will outshoot the last .243 Ruger I had. What more can I say?              IDShooter
 

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No need to say anything else.  I would do the same.  If I buy something to eat of a particular and the food is always bad, I wouldn't buy that brand anymore.  Sad thing about Remington is their product is good, but the service I received was so lousy I couldn't stand to go back.  There isn't any excuse with today's technology and education that any manufacturer can't turn out a satisfactory product.  I can understand the heavy triggers, I can understand a bolt that needs some breaking in before it slides like greased ball bearings.  I can't understand why any production rifle won't shoot a 2" group or better (if shot properly).  Yes, alot of things have to come together to make a rifle shoot just right and I don't expect 1/4 minute groups, with with today's CNC machining, metallurgy and casting or forging procedures, things should be pretty good.  Now if I did get a Ruger that shot 2 or 2.5 inches at 100 yards, I'd be disappointed but would try to cure it's ills myself.  If that didn't work it would go back to the factory, if it wouldn't do any better after I got it back, I'd get rid of it.  I might buy one more of that particular brand or model, and if that had the ills, that brand wouldn't receive any more of my money.  I work too hard to earn my paycheck and there just isn't enough of it to throw good money after bad.  I can't blame you, no sir.  I just hate to hear it was Ruger, why couldn't it have been Remington?  <!--emo&;)--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=';)'><!--endemo-->
 
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